Beyond Visible Light

For a different look at color photography, try these shooting and processing tips using infrared digital capture
Text & Photography by Russell Hart

Cranes Feeding At Sunset, Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
The light was pretty warm already when I photographed these cranes eating the corn that’s fed to them in winter at New Mexico’s Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Infrared turned the sky yellowish-orange, and that color is reflected in the marshy pools of the Rio Grande Valley. I took the photograph handheld, braced on the top of my car, with a Nikon 70-200mm ƒ/4 and 1.4x teleconverter. The lens was zoomed all the way in, giving me an effective focal length of 280mm that helped create the picture’s flat, “compressed” appearance. I kept the shutter speed high enough (1/250 sec.) to reasonably freeze the redwinged blackbirds flying in front of the mountains and stopped down to ƒ/13 to make sure everything was sharp from front to back.

The trees on the mountains, and, to a lesser extent, the brush surrounding the water, have the typical blue-green (cyan) color that digital infrared capture renders foliage. It was a little too blue for my taste, so I altered it in Photoshop to make it greener and therefore natural, though I didn’t take it all the way. Instead of using saturation sliders to do this, I went into the Selective Color control, increasing the yellow in the image’s blues and reducing magenta in the image’s greens, among a few other adjustments. Selective Color isn’t a control typically used much by photographers but is one I’ve found useful for subtle tweaking of color with infrared.
— – —

— – —

Beyond Visible Light
by Russell Hart

more in: Outdoor Photographer Magazine
Vol. 35 No. 8 | September 2019

— – —

Weather Photographer of the Year 2019

The Royal Meteorological Society (RMetS) is looking for the best photographs from around the world that depict weather in its widest sense.

From weather phenomena to the impact of weather, we are looking for stunning images that showcase the sometimes dramatic, often fascinating impact and story of weather.

For the Royal Meteorological Society’s Weather Photographer of the Year we are looking for images that capture the beauty, power, occasional absurdity and fragility in the face of human activity.

— – —

Vote for your favourite from the 24 shortlisted entries and help choose the Weather Photographer of the Year 2019.

more at photocrowd

— – —

Photographer Captures the Disappearing Beauty of Greenland’s Icebergs

On a recent trip to Greenland, landscape photographer Albert Dros had the opportunity to sail through the waters around Disko Bay. Located on the west coast of the country, the area is filled with wildlife like walruses, seals, and whales. They frolic in the icy waters that are dotted with icebergs. While Dros was in the area, he had a chance to experience the changing dynamic of Greenland’s environment and shoot some incredible imagery.

— – —

Photographer Captures the Disappearing Beauty of Greenland’s Icebergs
Interview by Jessica Stewart

more at My Modern Met

— – —

Aviation As Seen By Photographers

The International Society for Aviation Photography brings together people who share a love of aviation and look to preserve its history through their images. Through this organization, members seek to enhance artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie.

— – —

Aviation As Seen By Photographers
more in: ISnAP September 2019 issue.

— – —

Fantastic Forest Fotos

“The clearest way into the Universe- is through a forest wilderness.” – John Muir And, here is another really good quote! “And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul.” – Anonymous. Enjoy these soulful forest and field images.

Photo by
Nikki Georgieva Vega
— – —

Photo by
urakistvan
— – —

Photo by
jo_pho_to
— – —

Morning sun
by Fernand Larochelle
— – —

Autums ending
by wimvandem
— – —

Fantastic Forest Fotos
more at GuruShots

— – —

Scuba Diving Magazine’s 2019 Underwater Photo Contest Winners

The photographers who submitted to Scuba Diving’s 2019 underwater photo contest blew our judges away, entering what we believe is among the best underwater photos of the year.

Even in the 15th year of our Through Your Lens Underwater Photo Contest, we are continually impressed by the talent and creativity of underwater photographers from around the globe. This year, we asked underwater photographers of all skill levels to submit their best work in the following categories: behavior, compact camera, macro and wide-angle. It was tough to narrow it down from the 2,560 images entered but you will see below that the winners are more than deserving. With so many beautiful images to choose from, we named an additional 11 honorable mention winners in 2019.

Grand Prize Winner
Jack Israel, Baja California, Mexico
— – —

Macro
First Place
Nicholas Samaras, Stratoni, Greece
— – —

Wide-Angle
Third Place
Pier Mane, Trou-Aux-Biches, Mauritius
— – —

Honorable Mention
Bruno Van Saen, Romblon, Philippines
— – —

Honorable Mention
Michael Gallagher, Palau
— – —

2019 Underwater Photo Contest Winners
more in Scuba Diving Magazine

— – —

The Visual Synthesis of Time & Space

David Ingraham’s photographs are juxtapositions that involve technique, visual effects and imagery. Photographing solely in black and white, there’s an even greater emphasis on lines and forms.

Conchita Fernandes immerses herself into David Ingraham’s subliminal world, and discovers how his foray in the photographic medium helped him break its rules.
— – —

The Visual Synthesis of Time & Space
more in Better Photography

The September 2019 issue is the first part of a two volume showcase that delves into the unusual magic of forms, colours and geometry, as seen by Naoya Takahashi, Natalie Christensen, David Ingraham, Joana P Cardozo, Jakub Pasierkiewicz, Nuno Perestrelo, Anil Risal Singh, José Luis Barcia Fernández and Ajay Salvi.
— – —