Capture drool-worthy photos of your favorite foods with these photography tips.

Take a moment to play around with basic photo framing: the rule of thirds, S curves, leading lines, diagonal lines, and symmetry versus asymmetry. Certain foods may look beautiful when arranged on a simple plate, while other foods take on a new form if you fill your frame with an extreme close-up. On the opposite side of the spectrum, you don’t have to fit everything in your photo every time. Let your viewer’s imagination run wild by choosing to share just a part of your seven-course spread.

Natural lighting is good, but natural lighting with a hazy filter is even better. Always aim to shoot outdoors during golden hour or use translucent curtains to filter intense light through windows. Also, don’t be afraid of shooting at a high ISO (400 – 1600) to get an artfully grainy shot. If neither of these options are available, use a camera with manual settings to adjust exposure or a lens with a fast aperture that captures more light when shooting delectable dishes in low light areas. Just leave the flash off.

A perfect image is all in the prep. This could mean work-in-progress shots of diced vegetables on a wooden board or fruit sitting in a harvest basket waiting to be baked. Use ingredients to add character and texture by creating imperfections like overflowing sauces, dollops of cream, herbs, crumbs, and grains of sea salt. Again, think about the depth of your photo and focus on various ingredients to see what yields the best shot.

I always say that composition is 51 percent of a photo, editing is 49 percent, and lighting is 100 percent. Lighting is everything. Think about what a camera is: it’s a box that lets in light. Beyond that, composition is the foundation of your photo. Because composition is based on universal visual principles, it’s the thing that’s going to make your photograph universally appealing. That being said, editing is the thing that’s going to make your photograph even more attractive. Basically, think of composition like bone structure and editing as your makeup.

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Capture drool-worthy photos of your favorite foods with these photography tips.
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Elevate Your Bird Photography Game

Elevate Your Bird Photography Game with our FREE 26-page guide featuring photography tips from world-renowned bird photographer and Olympus Visionary Scott Bourne, gear recommendations and more!

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The Olympus Guide to Shooting Pretty Darn Sweet Bird Photos
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Olympus Global Open Photo Contest

Throughout our near 100-year history, Olympus has been recognized as a pioneer and innovator focused on contributing to society by making people’s lives healthier, safer and more fulfilling. In line with these contributions, the Olympus Global Open Photo Contest 2017-18 featured the following six categories.

Over 150,000 entries were received from around the world. Thanks to all who entered. Here are the photos our judges selected as winners and runners-up. Congratulations to the photographers of these fascinating photos!

Grand Prize
Not leave Me by Myo Thet
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Connections to Cherish
Category First Prize by Alexandr
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Stories
Category First Prize – salt by giancarlolepore
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Power of Life
Category First Prize – Maternidad by Mick-Villa
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Art
Category First Prize – The winds of Aegean Sea by almoustris
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Olympus Global Open Photo Contest
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Olympus Visionary | Tracie Maglosky

Tracie Maglosky is an award-winning wedding and portrait photographer living in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio area. Her studio is located in the heart of downtown Cincinnati’s Brewery and Arts District in OTR. As a distinguished member of the Visionary Program for Olympus, she travels frequently to present her photography, lighting and posing techniques for weddings, maternity and newborn photography and proven business strategies.

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Olympus Visionary
Tracie Maglosky

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Making Fashion Photography Easy

Making Fashion Photography Easy by Olympus Photographer Joe Edelman
Fashion and beauty portraits are fun to shoot and allow you to explore your creative instincts with very few rules to cramp your style. While the end result can seem elaborate and expensive to create it doesn’t have to be. Here are my tips for creating with simple lighting and household props that won’t break the bank and will leave you with more money for some awesome Olympus gear!

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Making Fashion Photography Easy by Olympus Photographer Joe Edelman
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11 Tips for Capturing Spring

With spring officially upon us, it’s time to get the cameras out and explore the beauty of the changing season. Unlike the stark contrasts that winter landscapes present, burgeoning new life is more subtle and challenging to capture, particularly if you’re in a northern clime where spring comes slowly in fits and starts.

Whether you’re going for that perfect panorama of mountain dogwoods or a close-up of a single crocus struggling to bloom through the snow, a few tips can help you get the most from your spring photo shoots.

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11 Tips for Capturing Spring by Olympus Visionary Larry Price
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An Eye for Birds: A Photographic Journey

Join Olympus Visionary Scott Bourne and BirdWatching Magazine on a photographic journey – learn pro tips, techniques, styles and tools. Take your bird photography skills to the next level and download this multi-part series.

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An Eye for Birds: A Photographic Journey
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