Through the Photographer’s Eye

A photographer often sees the world in a different way to everyone else, making the invisible visible.

Wistmans wood, Dartmoor
by Richard Limb
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Regression
by Richard Lingo
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Underneath
by Paul C
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Jan Shooting At Marilyn Pond In Infrared
by Mike Cunningham
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The dark Hedges from the south west
by Paul Nash
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Through the Photographer’s Eye
more at photocrowd

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How to look at a photo and how to learn from looking at it

In The Photographers Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released. In the sequel, The Photographers Mind, he explained the way that professional photographers think a picture through before taking it. Both of these international best-sellers featured Michaels own photography: stunning landscapes, revealing portraits, and fascinating street photography.

Now, in The Photographers Vision, he examines the work of photographys greats, explaining how to look at a photo and how to learn from looking at it. The featured work includes some of the most distinguished names in photographys history: Nick Knight, Frederick Henry Evans, Frans Lanting, Tim Page, Wolfgang Tillmans, Nan Goldin, Paul Outerbridge, Walker Evans, Cindy Sherman, Elliott Erwitt, Trent Parke, Jeff Wall, Paul Strand, Romano Cagnoni, Horst Faas, James Casebere and many more, making this book visually stunning as well as intellectually authoritative.

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The Photographer’s Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography
by Michael Freeman

via good reads

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The Art Of Seeing

In this three-part article series, we take a deep dive into the fundamentals of composing landscape photographs
Text & Photography By Marc Muench

There’s a magical moment in landscape photography when you find the right position, the subject is at the correct angle, bathed in perfect light, and, with your camera in hand, you capture “The Shot”—the perfect composition for the scene. These are the moments we all want to repeat, but for whatever reason, they are difficult to find. The more you learn about how much goes into creating such moments, the more you realize just how complex and involved they are to repeat.

This is the “Art of Seeing.”

I break the process of seeing down into three elements that I call the “creative trinity.” Subject, light and composition make up the trinity, and the fuel that fires it is timing.

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The Art Of Seeing
more at Outdoor Photographer

part 1part 2part 3

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Exquisitely Composed Photos That Each Tell A Unique Story

Have you spent much time thinking about the nature of composition in a photograph? Consider this… when you begin the process of creating a photograph something has caught your attention. That “something” seems worthy of capture and to pass onto others (your viewers). The problem is the “others” aren’t there with you when take the photograph. They didn’t see and feel the scene as you did. Composition is the tool that helps you convey that silent message to a viewer who is perhaps thousands and thousands of miles away.

“are you Talking to Me ? ” by ilias Orfanos
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“Jinx Cosplay” by Amanda Café
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“Half light in the forest” by Luís Rodrigues
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“Dark Clouds” by Christian Giger Photography
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“Fishermen hanging their fishing tools ” by Nguyen Quoc Thang
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Exquisitely Composed Photos That Each Tell A Unique Story
more at gurushots

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Perspective: a small thing that makes a big difference

It sounds cliché to say, “it’s all a matter of perspective”, but in photography a slight change in your camera’s position can make a big difference to the overall look of your final image. Let me take you on a recent expedition to a local field to show you what I mean.
by Peter Baumgarten, Olympus Visionary

The Formula
Well, there really isn’t one, except perhaps – move and shoot (or is that, shoot and move). Each scene is different, but your viewer will be far more engaged if you offer an unusual view of your subject. Some suggestions include;
Shoot higher than eye level
Shoot lower than eye level
Shoot straight up or straight down
Move in close or back away
Frame your subject – use a door, window, arch, tree branch (this is a whole blog post on its own)
Switch lenses or focal lengths (again another blog post)
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Perspective: a small thing that makes a big difference
more by Peter Baumgarten
at Olympus

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Take Better Travel Photographs

How to make the most of your next trip and return home with a portfolio of memorable images.
Text & Photography by Ken Kaminesky

One of the challenge of making portfolio-worthy photographs when traveling in new places is fnding a balance between focusing on image making and simply being present and absorbing the experience …
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Take Better Travel Photographs
more in Outdoor Photographer – May 2019

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Portraits by Elena Mironova | Елена Миронова

Portraits
by Elena Mironova | Елена Миронова

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Portraits
by Elena Mironova | Елена Миронова
more at 35photo