How Billie Eilish Is Reinventing Pop Stardom

The Coachella Music Festival, not necessarily known for its adorable moments, offered up the pop equivalent of two baby pandas playing when, under the pink arena lights and to the accompaniment of the cheering and frantic uploading of a thousand teenage witnesses, Billie Eilish met her idol, Justin Bieber, for the first time last April.

The scene, touching as it was, begged consideration of its broader culture significance. Here were two pop prodigies, ages 17 and 25, at rather different points in their career arcs. The walls of Eilish’s childhood bedroom were once papered with images of Bieber, and when he enfolded her oversize denim bootleg Louis Vuitton–logoed self in a long embrace, a chasm seemed to yawn underneath their adjacent but distinct generations. Eilish, whose full-length album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, debuted at number one a week before the festival began, is not the first young singer to make hit records out of dark sonic tableaux. But the totality of her effect on the pop landscape—from her whispered anti-anthems to her bloblike anti-fashion to the sense of it’s-really-me relatability she provides to her fans—has made her immediate predecessors seem almost passé.

“This whole time I’ve been getting this one sentence,” Eilish says, “like, I’m a rule-breaker. Or I’m anti-pop, or whatever. I’m flattered that people think that, but it’s like, where, though? What rule did I break? The rule about making classic pop music and dressing like a girly girl? I never said I’m not going to do that. I just didn’t do it.”

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How Billie Eilish Is Reinventing Pop Stardom
By Rob Haskell

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New Teddy Girl

Models Qun Ye and Xie Chaoyu front ‘New Teddy Girl’ a boarding school style rebellion styled by Austin Wang. Photographer Liu Song is behind the lens in Vogue China’s Vogue Me fashion story for the February 2020 issue

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New Teddy Girl
Qun Ye and Xie Chaoyu by Liu Song

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The age of influence, it’s said, is upon us.

The age of influence, it’s said, is upon us. Whether on the front row or on the front benches – or simply leaning over our smartphones – we have more eyes on each other than at any time in history. As is also often said these days, it’s a lot.

Of course, in the fashion industry and across social media, the concept of an “influencer” has evolved in a few short years into one that we all fully understand. Many influencers are now stars in their own right, while millions more around the globe, armed with a new handbag and a winning filter, continue to strive for clicks and likes. It’s an important sea change, but I do sometimes wonder how many are doing anything truly useful with this modern superpower.

Emma Watson is one woman getting it right. Since she was cast as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter franchise 20 years ago (aged just nine), she has been one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. Famous in practically every corner of the world, she accumulated influence the old-fashioned way; coming of age in the digital era means she now finds herself with a cross-platform following of over 100 million engaged and devoted fans. …
Photographer Alasdair McLellan
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The age of influence, it’s said, is upon us.
more in: “Emma Watson Covers The December Issue Of British Vogue”
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See Emily Play

Emily DiDonato by Kat Irlin for Vogue Greece October 2019

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See Emily Play
Vogue Greece – October 2019

Photographer Kat Irlin, Fashion Editor Anna Katsanis, Make-Up Artist Joseph Carrillo, Hair Stylist Brittan White, Settings Editor Stewart Gerard, Manicurist Geraldine Holford, Featured Model Emily DiDonato

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“I’m so grateful to be in a position of power and to have more creative control,” she says. “That is embraced and encouraged now”

Taking Control
Margot Robbie is many things—a chameleonic actor, an up-and-coming producer, a bridge between old Hollywood and new. Just don’t call her a bombshell. By Irina Aleksander. Photographed by Inez & Vinoodh.

In the years since she faced down Leonardo DiCaprio’s Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street, Margot Robbie has persuasively staked her claim as far more than a so-called “bombshell,” a characterization that the actress strongly resents. “I’m not someone who walks in a room and the record stops and people turn like, ‘Look at that woman’,” she tells Irina Aleksander in our July cover story. A better word, at least by fellow Aussie Nicole Kidman’s estimation, would be “powerhouse,” and it fits: Next month, she is starring in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (fulfilling a career goal of working with filmmaker Quentin Tarantino) and Robbie’s now five-year-old production company, LuckyChap, has an extraordinary slate of female-fronted films currently in development. Here, in her cover slideshow, see the boundary-breaking star assume a few more roles in evocative looks by Marc Jacobs, Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Michael Kors, Chanel, Versace, Celine, and Burberry. Photographed by Inez and Vinoodh.

more at Vogue

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Put It In Print

Summer’s sun-kissed swimwear mixes bold patterns and graphics with Hockney-like colors for a poolside wardrobe that’s a tall drink of water.
Photographed by Oliver Hadlee Pearch.

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It Takes Two
Models Vittoria Ceretti and Kendall Jenner photographed by Oliver Hadlee Pearch.
more in Vogue Magazine

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