Nature Photographer of The Year

Nature Photographer of The Year is a Nature Photography contest that celebrates the beauty of nature photography.

Overall winner: Csaba Daróczi (Hungary) | Jump
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Bence Mate (HU) | Wings
Highly Commended (Nature Art)
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Brandon Yoshizawa (US) | Flower Power
Highly Commended (Landscapes)
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David Frutos Egea (ES) | The Fallen Idol III
Category winner (Plants and Fungi)
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Peter Cech (CZ) | Greeting the sun
Category Winner (Birds)
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more at: Nature Photographer of The Year

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Photo of the Day | The Archive

Photos of the Day from National Geographic Archive

Hello Starling
“Between October and the start of March, thousands of starlings make their home in Brighton and the surrounding areas,” says Your Shot photographer Kevin Meredith. “Just before sunset they form huge murmurations and flock about Brighton Pier before roosting under the Pier.”
Photograph by Kevin Meredith
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Growing Strong
A bonsai tree grows out of a dead tree in the middle of a river. “This little tree reminds me that you can grow and blossom under impossible circumstances with a little bit of determination,” says Your Shot photographer Sam Snaps.
Photograph by Sam Snaps
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Beautiful Bird
A red-tailed comet displays its stunning, iridescent feathers as it feeds. Its deeply-forked tail makes it one of the most distinctive and well-known hummingbird species. “Your perspective really captures his feathers in their full beauty” commented Your Shot associate photo editor Kristen McNicholas. “I love how symmetrical your frame is and how I can immediately focus on the beauty of this bird!”
Photograph by Damilice Mansur
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Penguins’ Paradise
A small colony of penguins lives near St. Kilda’s pier in Melbourne, Australia. “Every night sometime after sunset, the adults of the colony will come home to nest,” says Your Shot photographer Doug Gimesy.
“Occassionally a few can be found standing on the top of the rocks, calling for their mate, drying themselves, or simply watching the world from a different perspective – above the water.”
Photograph by Doug Gimesy
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Rise Above
Just the tops of San Francisco’s tallest buildings are visible above the fog, backlit by a dramatic sunrise. “What a magical morning this was!” remembers Your Shot photographer Aya Okawa.
Photograph by Aya Okawa
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Photo of the day | The archive
more at National Geographic

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Whatever The Weather

The vagaries of our climate can be frustrating, but at the same time they offer some fantastic opportunities for exciting and engaging photography. In this category, any subject goes, as long as it has weather as its dominating theme. This might mean the morning light streaming through autumn mist, someone running for the bus through the pouring rain, people snoozing on a sun-drenched beach, or a mountainscape in the snow. Be creative with how you portray the scene in front of you, perhaps using a long exposure to capture streaking raindrops or a neutral-density graduated filter to emphasise the moodiness of a stormy sky.

Porthcawl
by Jay Birmingham
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Fishing village at night
by Michael Epel
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Hintersee morning
by Kai Hornung
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Just a bit windy
by Tuule Müürsepp
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Hold on tight!
by foxbird
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Whatever The Weather
Part of Amateur Photographer of the Year 2019

more at photocrowd

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‘Seas’ the Day

Have you ever felt like chilling by the beach to enjoy picturesque views of the ocean while the wind blows through your hair?
We’re excited to announce the winner of our ‘Seas’ the Day photo contest!
In this contest, we invited our members to submit a photograph that captures their favourite ocean moments.

“Seagull” by David YK Hong
“There are no words that can describe the beauty of an ocean perfectly! With an eye for photography, David managed to capture this beautiful sunset behind the lens. I love the way he has framed the photo against the scenic setting of the sun which creates an illusion of a “sky of fire” and the water reflecting the last ray of the dawn. The image also stunningly captures the seagulls in action against the shadow of the burning sun. Congratulations, David YK Hong.” – June Yeo
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“Another image I would like to give credit to is “Stormy Beach” by Sock Mui Teo. The reflection of the clouds and the fishing boat waiting for the storm to get over against the calm water adds to the picture’s great composition.” – June Yeo
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Photo by: June Yeo
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Twilight by Joel Chua
Blue hour at raffles marina
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‘Seas’ the Day Photo Contest Winner
more at eosworld

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First look: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 55

Explore this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images.

Lucky break by Jason Bantle
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Sleeping like a Weddell by Ralf Schneider
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Big cat and dog spat by Peter Haygarth
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If penguins could fly by Eduardo Del Álamo
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Cool drink by Diana Rebman
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The fifty-fifth Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition will immerse you in the breathtaking diversity of the natural world.
Encounter the beauty and fragility of wildlife, see fascinating animal behaviour and get to know extraordinary species, exhibited on 100 stunning lightbox displays.
Go deeper and discover the surprising – and often challenging – stories behind the images during a time of environmental crisis.
A panel of international experts selected the awarded images from almost 50,000 entries by the world’s best photographers.
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This year’s exhibition opens on 18 October and runs until summer 2020.

more at Natural History Museum

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Beyond Visible Light

For a different look at color photography, try these shooting and processing tips using infrared digital capture
Text & Photography by Russell Hart

Cranes Feeding At Sunset, Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
The light was pretty warm already when I photographed these cranes eating the corn that’s fed to them in winter at New Mexico’s Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Infrared turned the sky yellowish-orange, and that color is reflected in the marshy pools of the Rio Grande Valley. I took the photograph handheld, braced on the top of my car, with a Nikon 70-200mm ƒ/4 and 1.4x teleconverter. The lens was zoomed all the way in, giving me an effective focal length of 280mm that helped create the picture’s flat, “compressed” appearance. I kept the shutter speed high enough (1/250 sec.) to reasonably freeze the redwinged blackbirds flying in front of the mountains and stopped down to ƒ/13 to make sure everything was sharp from front to back.

The trees on the mountains, and, to a lesser extent, the brush surrounding the water, have the typical blue-green (cyan) color that digital infrared capture renders foliage. It was a little too blue for my taste, so I altered it in Photoshop to make it greener and therefore natural, though I didn’t take it all the way. Instead of using saturation sliders to do this, I went into the Selective Color control, increasing the yellow in the image’s blues and reducing magenta in the image’s greens, among a few other adjustments. Selective Color isn’t a control typically used much by photographers but is one I’ve found useful for subtle tweaking of color with infrared.
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Beyond Visible Light
by Russell Hart

more in: Outdoor Photographer Magazine
Vol. 35 No. 8 | September 2019

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