First look: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 55

Explore this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images.

Lucky break by Jason Bantle
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Sleeping like a Weddell by Ralf Schneider
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Big cat and dog spat by Peter Haygarth
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If penguins could fly by Eduardo Del Álamo
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Cool drink by Diana Rebman
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The fifty-fifth Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition will immerse you in the breathtaking diversity of the natural world.
Encounter the beauty and fragility of wildlife, see fascinating animal behaviour and get to know extraordinary species, exhibited on 100 stunning lightbox displays.
Go deeper and discover the surprising – and often challenging – stories behind the images during a time of environmental crisis.
A panel of international experts selected the awarded images from almost 50,000 entries by the world’s best photographers.
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This year’s exhibition opens on 18 October and runs until summer 2020.

more at Natural History Museum

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Beyond Visible Light

For a different look at color photography, try these shooting and processing tips using infrared digital capture
Text & Photography by Russell Hart

Cranes Feeding At Sunset, Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
The light was pretty warm already when I photographed these cranes eating the corn that’s fed to them in winter at New Mexico’s Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Infrared turned the sky yellowish-orange, and that color is reflected in the marshy pools of the Rio Grande Valley. I took the photograph handheld, braced on the top of my car, with a Nikon 70-200mm ƒ/4 and 1.4x teleconverter. The lens was zoomed all the way in, giving me an effective focal length of 280mm that helped create the picture’s flat, “compressed” appearance. I kept the shutter speed high enough (1/250 sec.) to reasonably freeze the redwinged blackbirds flying in front of the mountains and stopped down to ƒ/13 to make sure everything was sharp from front to back.

The trees on the mountains, and, to a lesser extent, the brush surrounding the water, have the typical blue-green (cyan) color that digital infrared capture renders foliage. It was a little too blue for my taste, so I altered it in Photoshop to make it greener and therefore natural, though I didn’t take it all the way. Instead of using saturation sliders to do this, I went into the Selective Color control, increasing the yellow in the image’s blues and reducing magenta in the image’s greens, among a few other adjustments. Selective Color isn’t a control typically used much by photographers but is one I’ve found useful for subtle tweaking of color with infrared.
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Beyond Visible Light
by Russell Hart

more in: Outdoor Photographer Magazine
Vol. 35 No. 8 | September 2019

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2019 Audubon Photography Awards Marks 10th Year of Exquisite Bird Photography

Birds make fascinating subjects, as the winners and honorable mentions of this year’s contest, our 10th, make clear. They’re at once beautiful and resilient, complex and comical. Thank you to the 2,253 entrants from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and 10 Canadian provinces and territories for your dedication to appreciating, celebrating, and sharing the wonder of birds and the landscapes they inhabit.

Presented in association with Nature’s Best Photography, winning photos and honorable mentions will be featured at the biennial Audubon Convention in July 2019, in future issues of Audubon magazine and Nature’s Best Photography magazine, and in a special traveling Audubon Photography Awards exhibit hosted by Audubon chapters and centers across the country.

Grand Prize Winner
Red-winged Blackbird. Photo: Kathrin Swoboda/Audubon Photography Awards
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Professional Winner
Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Elizabeth Boehm/Audubon Photography Awards
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Youth Winner
Horned Puffin (captive). Photo: Sebastian Velasquez/Audubon Photography Awards
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Plants for Birds Winner
Hooded Oriole on a California fan palm. Photo: Michael Schulte/Audubon Photography Awards
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Amateur Honorable Mention
Great Blue Herons. Photo: Melissa Rowell/Audubon Photography Awards
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About Audubon
The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow. Audubon works throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and on-the-ground conservation. State programs, nature centers, chapters, and partners give Audubon an unparalleled wingspan that reaches millions of people each year to inform, inspire, and unite diverse communities in conservation action. A nonprofit conservation organization since 1905, Audubon believes in a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Learn more at http://www.audubon.org and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @audubonsociety.

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Nature’s Color

The outdoors are saturated with vibrant colors.
Nature’s Colors photo contest winners and finalists

Grand Prize Alan Krakauer
Tundra Slumber
The Land of the Midnight Sun may be most famous for its big bears and immense landscapes, but sometimes it’s the small quiet moments that leave a lasting impression. One day in late August while hiking over the spongy Arctic terrain near Toolik Lake in northern Alaska, I found a sleeping red fox snoozing on a bed of vibrant late summer tundra. This is one of my all-time favorite photos in part because of the gorgeous fall-like colors, but even more because I’m not sure I’ve ever captured a picture of an animal that seems so at peace in its surroundings. I got my photos and continued on my way, and left the fox to its dreaming.
Canon 6D, Canon 70-300 f/4-5.6L, ISO 800, Aperture f/5.6, Shutter Speed 1/500sec, No flash or tripod.
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Second Prize William Stekelberg
Lake Martin Great Blue Heron
The photo was taken from a small boat on Lake Martin, Louisiana, near the town of Breaux Bridge. I was attracted to the way the late afternoon light was illuminating the heron while backlighting the foliage, which was in its “fall color” stage. The image has been cropped a little for compositional reasons.
Nikon D850, Tamron 150-600mm G2, handheld.
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Third Prize Perri Schelat
Moth Confetti
I created Moth Confetti last Fall, while walking along the Middle Fork of the Flathead River, a stretch that forms the southwest boundary of Glacier National Park. In the Fall the water gets low making it possible to get down in the river and explore amongst pools and rocks. I took a walk in the river, hand holding my camera, which allowed more artistic freedom not being attached to a tripod. I came across a small pool of water wedged in between two boulders full of dead months floating on top of fallen aspen leaves. It was an interesting intimate scene almost an abstract. The water was slightly moving, light was low and I was hand holding. I used an higher ISO to get a fast shutter speed, which was complicated by the need for a small aperture to get greater depth of field from corner to corner. It was a challenge to get just the right balance and the result I wanted. In the end the image really spoke to my current interest and exploration of smaller scenes, while taking time to be more thoughtful and introspective in the field.
Nikon D810, Nikon 24-70mm with VR on F16, 1/160, ISO 1600, 70mm focal length, Global RAW file adjustments made in Lightroom. Basic local adjustments made in Photoshop.
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Finalist
Oracle by Abe Blair
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Finalist
Red Legged Honeycreeper by Kevan Sunderland
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Nature’s Colors Photo Contest Winners and Finalists
more at Outdoor Photographer

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Celebrating bird photography from around the world

Promoting bird photography and the photographers behind the images is one of the primary aims of the Bird Photographer of the Year competition.

Here are some images from the “Bird Photographer of the Year 2019 Shortlist”

La Dama Blanca
White Stork – Ciconia ciconia. Stanislao Basileo, Italy.
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Shadows
Common Guillemot – Uria aalge. Audun Lie Dahl, Norway.
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E(ART)H
Rufous Hummingbird – Selasphorus rufus. Shane Kalyn, Canada.
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Staring
Whiskered Treeswift – Hemiprocne comata. Wang Bin, Singapore.
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Catwalk
Common Eider – Somateria mollissima. Thomas Hinsche, Germany.
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Celebrating bird photography from around the world
go to Bird Photographer of the Year website, home to the world-renowned photography competition and a growing community of wildlife photographers and conservationists. Marvel at some of the World’s best bird images, interact with innovative and established wildlife photographers, and help them support conservation.

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Bruce the Bald Eagle

Interview: Incredible Split-Second Photo of Bald Eagle with Symmetrical Reflection

Amateur wildlife photographer Steve Biro has been photographing birds for the past 10 years. Intrigued by their behavior and pushed by his love for the outdoors, Biro spends hours each week honing his craft. On a recent trip to the Canadian Raptor Conservancy in Ontario, an interaction with a feisty Bald Eagle resulted in a photo that’s been causing a sensation online.

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Bruce the Bald Eagle
Interview: Incredible Split-Second Photo of Bald Eagle with Symmetrical Reflection

more at My Modern Met

Cherry Blossom in Colour

“I would like to see your photos of cherry blossom. You could show anything from a macro of a bud or single bloom, to branches or entire cherry blossom trees. Other things such as people can be shown in the image, but the cherry blossom must be dominant. All images must be in colour.”

Cherry blossom 2
by Borut Pihlar
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Cherry blossom
by Pamela Liu
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Sakura and anime-girls
by Yaroslava Gromova
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Ring-necked Parakeet
by Emma Durnford
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Cherry blossom in Virginia
by Jhafrix
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Cherry Blossom in Colour
Created and judged by Robert Snary
more at Photocrowd

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