The Fine Art Of Travel Photography


How does a photographer transcend the “I was here” imagery that’s often associated with travel photography and create fine-art images of places near and far? From the dozens of workshops I’ve taught on the subject, as well as talking with—and carefully studying the work of—many of the great globetrotting lensmen and lenswomen in the field, I’ve developed a methodology that, when applied, should yield impressive and, at times, spectacular results.
Text & Photography By Mark Edward Harris
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NIGHT EXPOSURES: The Matterhorn from Zermatt, Switzerland. Many cities thrive at night and bring a different dimension to the travel experience. For cityscapes and architecture, use a low ISO, lock down the camera on a sturdy tripod, lock up the mirror of an SLR and use a cable release.
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DEPTH OF FIELD: Bonito, Brazil. Shooting at a maximum depth of field can create unique perspectives, especially for stunning architectural shots and landscapes.
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SHOOTING CONTRE-JOUR: Yazd, Iran. Shooting with the sun behind the subject eliminates harsh shadows. In-camera meters can get thrown off by contre-jour situations and underexpose the scene, so it’s important to know how to utilize the camera’s exposure lock and exposure compensation controls.
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SILHOUETTES: Mandalay, Myanmar. Dramatic silhouettes can be shot at any time of the day, but there must be a strong contrast between your background and your subject.
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The Fine Art Of Travel Photography
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