Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

With a little more than a month to go, the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest is in full swing. Photographers have until November 17, 2017 to enter their best photographs valuing the beauty of the natural world.

Photo by Jay Ruan
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Photo by Marc Hornig
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Photo by Alexis Darden
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Photo by Phillip Chang
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Photo by Shane Kalyn
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Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
more by Jessica Stewart at My Modern Met

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Elegant Street Photography | Interview with Ando Fuchs

“Venice is one of my favorite places, the city offers me everything I need.” —Ando Fuchs

My interest in photography began in my youth, I photographed in color and without any particular ideas in mind, for some reason I stopped photographing but I never lost interest.
In 2009, I happened to get to know an amateur photographer who encouraged me to take up photography again; I credit him and another photographer whom I met later on as the reason I am photographing today. I am entirely self-taught and never leave home without my camera.

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Elegant Street Photography
by Ando Fuchs

more in Adore Noir Magazine

A Sea of Sands | The Namibian Sossusvlei

A landscape photographer’s dream land with its red and orange towering dunes and the ever-changing play of light and shadow upon them.
Photos by Andrea & Antonella Ferrari

Namibia’s Sossusvlei embodies some of the planet’s most spectacular landscapes, and its desert environment is a photographer’s paradise where dramatic colors, patterns and light reign supreme. It has seen to be believed – the chromatic shades of the gigantic dunes can change completely from one second to the next, in a dizzying and endless carousel of shifting colors and light-and-shadow patterns. In its strictest sense, Sossusvlei (sometimes written Sossus Vlei) is a salt and clay pan surrounded by high red dunes, located in the southern part of the Namib Desert, in the Namib-Naukluft National Park.

The name “Sossusvlei” is however often used in an extended meaning to refer to the surrounding area (including other neighbouring vleis such as Deadvlei and other high dunes), which is one of the major visitor attractions of Namibia. The name itself is of mixed origin and roughly means “dead-end marsh”. Vlei is the Afrikaans word for “marsh”, while sossus is Nama for “no return” or “dead end”. Sossusvlei owes this name to the fact that it is an endorheic drainage basin (i.e., a drainage basin without outflows) for the ephemeral Tsauchab River. The Sossusvlei area belongs to a wider region of southern Namib with homogeneous features (about 32.000 km²) extending between rivers Koichab and Kuiseb. This area is characterized by high sand dunes of vivid pink-to-orange color, an indication of a high concentration of iron in the sand and consequent oxidation processes.

The oldest dunes are those of a more intense reddish color. These dunes are among the highest in the world; many of them are above 200 metres, the highest being the one nicknamed Big Daddy, about 325 metres high; however, the highest dune in the Namib Desert area, Dune 7, is about 388 metres high. The highest and more stable dunes are partially covered with a relatively rich vegetation, which is mainly watered by a number of underground and ephemeral rivers that seasonally flood the pans, creating marshes that are locally known as vlei; when dry, these pans look almost white in color, due to the high concentration of salt. Another relevant source of water for Sossusvlei is the humidity brought by the daily morning fogs that enter the desert from the Atlantic Ocean.

Fauna in the Sossusvlei area is relatively rich, comprising several small animals that can survive with little water, including a number of arthropods, small reptiles and small mammalians such as rodents or jackals; bigger animals include antelopes (mainly oryxes and springboks) and ostriches. During the flood season, several migrant bird species appear along the marshes and rivers. Much of the Sossusvlei and Namib fauna is endemic and highly adapted to the specific features of the Namib. Most notably, fog beetles such as the Namib Desert Beetle have developed a technique for collecting water from early morning fogs through the bumps in their back.
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A Sea of Sands | The Namibian Sossusvlei
by Andrea & Antonella Ferrari

more at AnimaMundiMag

Through the lens of Australia’s best offroad photographers

Chasing light tends to become a way of life. It is part of the search, part of the yearning that burns with flickering and roaring flames within us all. When you look into someone’s eyes, and you almost catch a glimmer, that’s the yearning you’re seeing. Like all other artforms, it is infinite in its demands. Each day beckons, never to be repeated. And even if the days went on in perfect symmetry forevermore, it would be no less of a challenge to capture the beauty of the natural world, to transmute what we see into the gold on the page. In that way, every man, woman and child holding a camera is a kind of alchemist, seeking to transform their souls into something purer. And if there’s one thing I know for sure, everything in the world is already gold, including our souls. You just have to find the right perspective.

Some days the fire burns brighter, some days we only have embers: Moreton Island, Qld. – Carlisle Rogers
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There’s treasure everywhere, and gold covers the earth: Kimberley, WA. – Sean Scott
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Perspective is everthing. What is hidden is visible, and what is visible is hidden. -Sean Scott
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Roaming the chewed edge of the continent in technicolour: Cape Leveque, WA. – Sean Scott
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Give ‘em hell, survive. That’s the spirit of the desert breathing. – Carlisle Rogers
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Through the lens of Australia’s best offroad photographers
more in 4WD Touring Australia – Photo Annual

Full Force | Daisy Ridley Shoots for the Stars

While Daisy Ridley’s anonymity earned her the role of a lifetime, she has now emerged as a force beyond Star Wars. At 25, the London-born actress is unafraid to be vulnerable and unwilling to let the magnitude of the franchise define her budding career. Our November cover star let us in on the profound influence of her family, why she insisted on “growing up” out of social media’s glare, and how she coped with the stunning fame of Star Wars. Here, we bring that strength and versatility into focus with a series of gritty, action movie–inspired shots. See her cruise through the air in cascading Gypsy Sport and glide across metal grates in Valentino haute couture in this month’s cover slideshow.

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Daisy Ridley by Mario Testino
more at Vogue