Chasing storms in Australia by Dale Sharpe

As a landscape photographer I’ve travelled to most countries in the world, and I’ve photographed everything from Ice Caves and the Aurora in the north, the autumn colours in Patagonia in the south, and even the sandy deserts of the Middle East.

But when it comes to real challenges, storm chasing stands alone as a true test of my ability to capture nature’s fury in a fast paced and ever-changing environment.

— – —

Chasing storms in Australia by Dale Sharpe
more at Australian Photography

Advertisements

Landscapes and Cityscapes

Photography by Marek Biegalski

Sunbeam
— – —

Brooklyn park view
— – —

//no title
— – —

Manhattan sunset
— – —

Rockabill Lighthouse
— – —

Marek Biegalski
Landscape and Travel photographer
Photography tours and trips

more at 35photo

Shades of Color | Martin Zalba

The night landscapes master is now exploring a new way with infrared without losing an inch of style.
“From the first moment I started in earnest with photography, night photography caught my attention powerfully. It was a very expressive technique. At night there is little light, the night is quite unknown to us … Nature looks different, there is a magic light, it is a different way of seeing things.”

— – —

Martin Zalba Photography
more in Shades of Color Magazine

The Ultimate Guide to Night Photography

Night photography immediately solves a huge problem that you confront constantly in photography. That problem is being faced with ordinary scenes that just aren’t very interesting. If you take a picture of a building or a standard street scene during the day, it can be sort of dull. We are all used to seeing shots taken in the middle of the day. That same scene – shot at night – can be a really interesting photograph though.

The actual taking of pictures at night might seem a little bit like magic if you are just getting started. Even those who have been shooting a while may wonder how to get a proper exposure and focus in the dark. Although photographing in the dark certainly has its challenges, in some ways, it is actually easier than photography during the day.

So let’s take a quick look at the essentials of night photography. In particular, we’ll cover the gear you need, how to expose your photos, how to focus at night, great subject matter, and some post-processing tips. Hopefully, this will help open up the world of night photography to you.

Hopefully, this guide will help you get started with night photography. As you get ready for your next outing, just remember a few things:
– The only additional items that are necessary for night photography are a tripod and remote shutter release. Some other helpful items are a flashlight, a lens hood, and an extra battery.
– For exposure, start with moderate ISO (around 400) and aperture (around f/5.6-8) and see where that puts your shutter speed. Adjust from there with an eye toward getting the shutter speed (exposure time) you want.
– Pick a subject that lends itself to night photography. Remember that things look very different at night, so take some test shots.
– Focus your camera by finding or creating areas of contrast and setting the autofocus on those areas. When necessary, switch to manual focus.
– When you get home, edit your images as you wish, but you might try decreasing the Highlights, increasing the Shadows, and pulling down the Blacks slightly.

The Ultimate Guide to Night Photography
A Post By: Jim Hamel
In this, the next installment of our dPS ultimate guides, learn what you need to know to get started doing night photography.

get the guide at Digital Photography School

The Thrill of the Chase

There’s nothing on Earth like being confronted by the fury of wild weather. With more than 20 years’ experience storm chasing across Australia, Dale Sharpe shares his tips for amazing images in the eye of the storm.

How to Capture Lightning
1. Use a tripod and set your camera to Manual (M).
2. Set your camera’s ISO to its lowest value (100 or 200).
3. An aperture between f/5.6 and f/9 will give you a good depth of field.
4. The ideal shutter speed depends on the intensity of the lightning and how far away it is, but I recommend shooting 20-30 seconds for distant lightning strikes and 5 -10 seconds for closer strikes.
5. Set your lens to manual and focus to infinity. Fire a test shot to ensure the image is sharp.
6. If your lens or camera has image stabilisation turn it off! If the camera is on a tripod it will do more harm than good.
7. If you have a remote, lock the shutter release, so the camera captures one image after another.
8. Capturing the perfect bolt is often a matter of luck so the more time your shutter release is open the better your chances.
— – —

The Thrill of the Chase
by Dale Sharpe
via Australian Photography Magazine

Creative eye | Howard Kingsnorth

Photography has never been in a better place than it is right now. As the primary medium for ‘instant’ communicaton, it is now accessible to all. The alchemy that we used to enjoy: with the mysteries of film and exposure, the darkened rooms and chemicals, have all but been transcended by a small device that fits in your pocket and can send images anywhere in an instant. The digital revolution has enabled photographers and clients to push visual boundaries and enhance concepts, simply due to the power of instant review.
I love new tech. I’m always looking at it, buying it and playing with it.
Advances in digital manipulaton and capture are bound to make a difference to what we see today. More access for less able photographers and unskilled operators has been the trend lately, and that will only continue. A general dumbing down and consensus ‘look’ is what I see, especially in the fashion and celebrity world. But like any trend, there is a point when it will feel worn out and unable to go any further.

— – —

Creative eye | Howard Kingsnorth
more in f11 Magazine