The Art of Night

Sydney-based street photographer David Sark has spent the last two years capturing city streets around the world in his own unique way. This is how to create art in the black of night.

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The Art of Night | David Sark, Street Photographer
more by Mike O’Connor in Australian Photography

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On Reflection

In fashion as in life, Kristen Steward has always challenged gender norms with her androgynous beauty — which makes her the perfect face of Chanel’s new fragrance, Gabrielle, inspired by the legendary founder of the couture house. But she is also very much her own woman, as independent-spirited when it comes to fame and feminism as she has been in facing down Donald Trump.
By Elizabeth Day
Photographs by Tom Craig
Styled by Leith Clark

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On Reflection
Kristen Steward by Tom Craig

More in Harper’s Bazaar

A Passion That Keeps Growing | Jon Blake

Jon Blake | Landscape Photography
Interview by Harris Lim

Pier Pressure
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My approach to landscape photography is a process.  I imbed myself into a landscape scene and wait for the light to perfect as time passes through.  My hope is to present images which transport you – as though you were there with me when captured.  I want my work to trigger all of your senses so that you not only see the scene, but are transformed into it; that you can hear the splash, smell the mud, feel the sting of cold on your face and taste the pollen on the back of your throat.  If I’ve brought you along with me into another place, I’ve successfully done my job.

Converging Elements
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My love for photography began when my best friend and I took a photography course in middle school. It catalyzed a passion that I maintain to this day. I love learning new techniques and methods to express my creativity in my images; and I’m thrilled to share them with you. I’m continually amazed at how well my photographs are received, and that positivity energizes my passion all over again.

For Whom The Bells Toll
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Every photo I share with you has a story of its origin. Although you weren’t there with me for the journey, my hope is that you’ll feel transported back to the moment when it was captured.

Goblet of Fire
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Thanks for considering my work, and for supporting the arts!
Jon

The Edge of Time
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A Passion That Keeps Growing
Jon Blake | Landscape Photography

more in Bokeh Magazine
The Art and Life of Photography

Landscapes In Black And White

Landscapes In Black And White Photo Contest Winners

bwlandscapes02aCongratulations Grand Jury Winner “The Perfect Splash” by garyhunter_6788
“I found that Perfect Splash by Gary Hunter succeeds in meeting all of the above criteria. It meets all of the benchmarks of both photography in general and B&W in particular. Congratulations, Gary. It’s a stellar image. The moment, mood, composition, and B&W treatment are all exceptional!” – Tim Copper
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bwlandscapes02bCongratulations Runner Up “Winter Sunrise in Bagan” by zayyarlynn
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bwlandscapes02cCongratulations Runner Up “Princes Pier” by MissionMan
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bwlandscapes02dCongratulations Runner Up “EROTIC LANDSCAPE – II” by nikosladic
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bwlandscapes02eCongratulations Runner Up “Dark Hedges” by rogerhampton
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bwlandscapes02fCongratulations Runner Up “The Pier” by CurtisReese
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bwlandscapes02gCongratulations Amateur Winner “xarárfoss s-h (1 of 1) V” by sverrirjnsson
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bwlandscapes02hCongratulations People’s Choice “Reflection Row” by jamierichey
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bwlandscapes02i“Mirror of the sky” by aidagri
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Landscapes In Black And White Photo Contest Winners
more at viewbug

Wildlife photographer waited 6 years to capture this perfect shot

Six years. That’s how long it took Scottish wildlife photographer Alan McFadyen to capture the perfect shot.

After spending nearly 4,200 hours, McFadyen ended up with an exact symmetrical image of a kingfisher diving speedily into its reflection. Patience was certainly key here as McFadyen had to scour 720,000 exposures to finally get it right.

AlanMcFadyen12aMcFadyen, in an interview with the Daily Mail said, “Kingfishers dive so fast they are like bullets, so taking a good photo requires a lot of luck — and a lot of patience.” Couple that with the fact that female kingfishers rarely dive, and you’ve got yourself the biggest timing problem ever.
by Umar Ansari
via designfaves

visit Alan McFadyen’s Scottish Photography Hides for more

Midnight Swirl

Midnight Swirl
by Yiming Hu

YimingHu11aMysterious auroras swirl the midnight sky of this extremely remote mountain ranges near the Arctic circle. Technique Notes: This is a very complicated shot consists of 16 exposures. Fourteen consecutive frames using ISO 6300/f2.8/30-sec were used for focus-stacking and multi-frame-average-noise-reduction to get a high-quality, sharp foreground image under such difficult dark conditions. The reflection was captured using ISO 12800/f2.8/8 seconds. The aurora itself was recorded by tilting the lens to include more sky, using ISO 12800/f2.8/1-sec. The reflections, foreground, and the sky were stitched together to get the final image. The aurora was moving so fast that a slower shutter speed would have blurred its magical shape. These techniques were necessary to overcome the limitations of the camera sensor so I could capture what I saw with my naked eyes. Photographed in the Yukon Territory of Canada.

via earthshots