The American Landscape Photo Contest Winners

Congratulations to the winners of The American Landscape 2019 photo contest

Grand Prize Matt Meisenheimer
Jurassic
The cliffs of the Nā Pali Coast rise over 4,000 feet from the shoreline below. It’s a magnificent thing to see. The mountains of Kauai are some of the most unique out there. They give you the feeling that you’re living in a prehistoric environment that existed millions of years ago. I ran into some phenomenal conditions while hiking around the Kalalau Valley during a recent trip. I scrambled to find a suitable composition and came across this scene. I liked how the lone tree was catching light and I felt the rainbows were spaced perfectly with the tree. It was very windy and wet so the challenge was freezing motion in the vegetation and keeping my lens dry. I shot at a higher ISO to get a faster shutter speed and used a towel to dry my lens. I’d shoot a few frames, dry and cover my lens, take a few frames and repeat. Thankfully, my effort paid off and my resulting images were clean and sharp. This image portrays one of the most incredible events that I have had the opportunity to photograph.
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Second Prize Jemma Lee
Pink Lady Nipple
As each labored step forward resulted in two slippery steps back on the rocky mountainside ascend on this humid August day, I had naively assumed that we had reached our destination on the difficult hour long trek from the Cinder Cone parking lot. I begrudgingly continued the climb for two more hours and was grateful to be rewarded with an extraordinary view on the other side. At the base of the mountain a small cluster of pink mountains appeared in the distance, only to be revealed through my telephoto lens. This breathtaking view reminded me of being upon my mother’s breast when I was a young child. The vivid pinks, reds, purples and blues portrayed in the photograph are from the minerals on the ground below that were created from volcanoes erupted in the past.
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Finalist Craig Bill
Moonquest
Night photography in the scared slot canyons of the Navajo, Upper Antelope Canyon
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Finalist Jason Frye
Eventuality
The trees that line certain sections of the South Carolina coast are haunting yet beautiful, witnessing countless sunrises, sunsets, storms and rainbows…but their time is limited. Enjoy the moment, get out, you never know when an opportunity to photography something is your last chance.
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Finalist MWPhotography2
Glacial Stream -Two Medicine Lake – Glacier National Park
Two medicine lake lies about an hour south of St. Mary, Montana, on the east side of Glacier National Park. This lake one of the prettiest in the park and is not as well traveled as most parts of the park. At certain times of year, when the glacial run off is high, swift streams flow down into the lake. I bushwhacked for a few miles through the pristine evergreen forest to find this magical spot. There was an ample presence of bear scat along the way, prompting me to engage in my usual discussion with the trees and nature around me in order alert wildlife of my presence. I returned a few years later only to find this once vibrant stream had been reduced to a trickle by climate change.
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The American Landscape Photo Contest Winners
more at Outdoor Photographer

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Vietnam from above

A bird’s-eye view highlights the diverse landscapes of this Southeast Asian country.
Vietnam stretches over a thousand miles from north to south and measures only 31 miles wide at the narrowest point. Long and skinny, this J-shaped Southeast Asian country holds three distinct climate zones to lure travelers. Tea plantations stripe the mountains of the northern provinces near the border with China, beaches edge the South China Sea to the east, and in the south, the Mekong Delta creates a maze of rivers, swamps, and islands, dotted by floating markets and rice paddies just waiting to be explored.

Green tea islands dot an irrigation lake near Vietnam’s border with Laos.
Photograph by Trung Pham
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In Hanoi, a woman dries incense for people to pay respect to their ancestors.
Photograph by Thạch Phạm Ngọc
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During holidays, flowers float across the Perfume River in the central Vietnamese city of Hue.
Photograph by Ngo Dung
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Three women share a moped through the streets of Ho Chi Minh City.
Photograph by khai nguyen tuan
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Buildings and roads resemble an electronic circuit board in Ho Chi Minh City, populated by nine million people.
Photograph by Trung Pham
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See Vietnam’s diverse landscapes and staggering natural beauty through aerial photos captured by our photography community.

more at National Geographic

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Transcendent Beauty

Alexander Vershinin is a professional photographer and a member of The North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), the International Association of Panoramic Photographers (IAPP), Creative Asia Photo Association, and the Professional Photographers of America (PPA). He is into adventure tourism and specialises in panoramic landscape photos.

Alexander is a 100 percent self-taught photographer who has studied the art only through books. He has travelled a lot and takes part in many mountain and desert expeditions. He has travelled through Australia, South and North America and Asia on his photographic journeys in search of creating amazing landscape photos.

According to Alexander, “landscape photography makes it possible to better see the world around us, to expand the framework of the available view of nature, to attract more depth and help find oneself in places free of tourists”.

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Transcendent Beauty
by Alexander Vershinin

more at Smart Photography

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The 2nd Charles Dodgson Black & White Award

This second edition of the annual Black & White Competition, The Charles Dodgson Award, named after the author of Alice in Wonderland, also known as Lewis Carroll, received 750 entries from 37 countries.

When selecting Haim Blumenblat, with Winter Conversation, from the Cityscapes and Street Photography category, as the overall winner, Juror Chris Walker said: ‘It’s simple, beautiful, but not exotic — opportunities such as this exist everywhere. Our world is a beautiful place — and photographers need to understand they don’t have to be on the other side of it to make interesting photographs!’

Haim Blumenblat, Israel, ‘Winter Conversation’. Winner of the 2nd Charles Dodgson Black & White Award
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Erika Masterson. Runner Up, ‘Parts of the Earth, Keeper’
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Sandy Adams. Runner Up, cityscapes and street photography category
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Don Rice. Finalist, fine art category
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Jack Curran. Runner Up, landscapes category
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The 2nd Charles Dodgson Black & White Award
more at The Gala Awards

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Yanan Li | From China to Sweden with a Hasselblad

Born in Louyang, China in 1973, Yanan Li fell in love with analog Hasselblad cameras while studying film at university in Beijing, inspiring dreams of moving to Sweden one day. Over 40 years later, Yanan finds himself working as the official photographer for Stiftelsen Silviahemmet – founded and chaired by Her Majesty Queen Silvia of Sweden – as well as for the Nobel Committee for The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the Stockholm County and several of the Swedish capital’s notable points of interest. We got the chance to sit down with Yanan and hear his unique story about how he got where he is today in Sweden, which all started with a Hasselblad.

“I take pictures night and day, in winter frost and summer heat, from the royal family’s celebrations to Nobel Prize meetings behind closed doors, from castles to street life. I am so happy with the development of Hasselblad cameras over the years which allows me photograph in all of these environments.”
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Yanan Li | From China to Sweden with a Hasselblad
more at Hasselblad

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Setting The Scene

If you like cityscapes or landscapes then this round is for you. The brief is purposefully loose, and we are happy to receive images featuring anything from contemporary architecture to grand, mountainous vistas. From the early morning sun throwing shadows onto a skyscraper, to the undulating form of hills receding into the distance, the possibilities are endless. Don’t be afraid to be abstract in your interpretation: architecture, for instance, is full of curves, lines and other interesting details. When it comes to shooting the landscape, light is everything – so pay attention to sunrise and sunset times, the weather forecast and tide timetables, where appropriate. Whether you go urban or rural, planning is a must.

The Future by Neil Burnell
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Calm before the storm by Dominic Beaven Photography
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In the middle of the forest… by Eurofoto
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Morning Moon by Julia Martin
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Untitled by Caron Steele
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Setting The Scene
more at photocrowd

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The Nature Conservancy

We’re excited to announce the winners of the 2019 Photo Contest. This year’s photo contest received a record number of submissions from more than 150 countries. We thank everyone who entered or voted, and we look forward to your participation again next year.

Second Place, Water
Hao Jiang – United States
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Judges’ favorite
Ring of Fire by Leah Horstman
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Honorable Mention, Landscape
Florian LeDoux – France
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Judges’ favorite
La mirada del Caburé by Pablo Hernández
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Grand Prize Winner
Tyler Schiffman – United States
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The Nature Conservancy is a global environmental nonprofit working to create a world where people and nature can thrive.
Founded at its grassroots in the United States in 1951, The Nature Conservancy has grown to become one of the most effective and wide-reaching environmental organizations in the world. Thanks to more than a million members and the dedicated efforts of our diverse staff and more than 400 scientists, we impact conservation in 72 countries across six continents.
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2019 Photo Contest Winners
more at The Nature Conservancy

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