Earth From Above

Explore our awe-inspiring planet, continent by continent, through incredible images captured from the air by the likes of drones and satellites…

The pearls of Bahrain
Shaped like an ornate necklace, the Durrat Al-Bahrain islands are an artificial archipelago, whose name translates as ‘the most perfect pearl’. To create the 20km2 of new land off the south-east coast of Bahrain, 34 million cubic metres of material was dredged from the seafloor of the Persian Gulf. The islands are like mini towns with luxury homes, shopping malls and schools.
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The land of extremes
The rich red-orange sand dunes of the Namib Desert stretch inland towards the Naukluft Mountains. Most moisture from the Atlantic falls as rain near the coast, yet some rolls across the arid desert as fog, quenching wildlife and oxidising the iron in the sand dunes to create their red colour. Highland water flows down the Kuiseb River greening the land to the north. In the south, as the Tsondab River hits the desert, water evaporates, leaving behind white salt and mineral deposits.
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The great desert
This shot of part of t he Sahara in Western Libya was captured by EarthKAM – a NASA programme where students from all over the world can ask for images to be taken from the International Space Station of specific locations on Earth. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, with northeasterly winds that can reach hurricane levels, and as little as 2.5cm of rain on average each year.
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Island birth
The world’s youngest island, Nishinoshima, is made up of two sections which formed over 60 years apart. The lower section was created in 1973 when an underwater volcano erupted, while the upper part first broke through the ocean’s surface in November 2013, merging with its neighbour soon after. Every day, the island produces 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of lava.
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At the heart of green energy
Over 4,000 mirrors direct sunlight to a boiler in a central tower at the Khi Solar One power plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. At full capacity the boiler heats up to a toasty 530ºC. The plant began commercial operation in February 2016, and supplies energy to around 45,000 homes.
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more in:
Earth from Above
Our planet as you’ve never seen it before

Part of the BBC Focus Magazine Collection

Landscapes by Jim Harmer

One thing photographers have in common is the desire to progress as artists. For some it might be technical skills, others the creative, more artistic side. And for many of us, it is both sides that we want to grow in. Fortunately some photographers that are further along that pathway are more then happy to share and teach others. Jim Harmer is one of those photographers. He’s got an amazing eye, brilliant technical skills and loves sharing his knowledge. You may have heard of Jim through his online site, Improve Photography or from his podcast or social media.

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We got together with Jim and asked how it all began…

continue in Photo Live [ For the Love of Photography ]

Reimagining Californian Landscapes Through Infrared

Kate Ballis transforms familiar scenes into Technicolor dreamscapes in her new Infra Realism series
At first glance, Kate Ballis’ candy-coloured landscapes are reminiscent of the hand-tinted photographs that were prevalent in the mid-19th century, but these gorgeous popsicle-palette images were created with the aid of a specially converted infrared camera as opposed to a paintbrush.

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Reimagining Californian Landscapes Through Infrared by Kate Ballis
more at AnOther Mag

A girl in a dress

A girl in a dress is probably one of the most beautiful phenomena in the world. A girl in a dress on the background of an incredible landscape can bring to the ecstasy of people who are sensitive to contemplation.
For me, there is nothing more beautiful than the tangled fabric of the dress from the wind created by the running girl. This is magic. Therefore, in my trips my friends, helpers and I, try to pick up dresses for the landscape, dress up models and create.
By​ Кристина Макеева | Kristina Makeeva

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I Travel The World To Photograph Girls In Dresses Against Backgrounds Of The Most Beautiful Places
By​ Кристина Макеева | Kristina Makeeva

via boredpanda

Big Picture

Big Picture Natural World Photography Competition | 2017 Winners and Finalists Announced
We’re thrilled to share this year’s spectacular winners and finalists, chosen from nearly 6,000 entries.

Grand Prize
Confiscated, Denver, CO
Britta Jaschinski, England, UK

German wildlife photographer Jaschinski has been devoted to documenting the fractured existence of wildlife in captivity for over a decade. Her passion to protect animals, takes her across the globe to reveal otherwise untold stories about animal suffering. Jaschinski has received many international awards and lectures across Europe on photography and animal conservation issues.
These stools are only an example of the many deeply disturbing items that people try to smuggle through borders and airports across the globe. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stores 1.3 million seized items at a warehouse in Colorado. Trolleys are used to move the confiscated items around the warehouse. I placed the body parts on this backdrop to give some dignity to the objects and pay respect to the animals that loose their lives in the name of status, greed and superstition.
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Landscapes, Waterscapes, and Flora
Kamokuna Lava Firehose 25, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii
Jon Cornforth, Kilauea, Hawaii
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Winged Life
Snow Globe, Bosque del Apache, New Mexico
Denise Ippolito, Brielle, New Jersey
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2017 Series: Aerial Photography
Supra, New South Wales, Australia
Ray Collins, Sydney, Australia
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Terrestrial Wildlife
Ecosystem, Ermas National Park, Brazil
Marcio Cabral, Brasilia, Brazil
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Big Picture Natural World Photography Competition
2017 Winners and Finalists Announced

more at Big Picture Competition

Prendre Conscience de la Fragilité de la Terre par Thomas Pesquet

Ce qui a le plus frappé le spationaute français pendant ses six mois dans la Station internationale, c’est la fragilité de la Terre: «l’atmosphère est vraiment une mince bande ridicule qui contient toute la vie. Autour, il n’y a rien, à des milliards d’années-lumière. J’ai vu la déforestation, les bandes rasées qui s’enfoncent dans les forêts en Amérique du Sud, les fleuves qui charrient des pollutions, des boues, le dégazage des bateaux, la pollution atmosphérique – je n’ai jamais pu prendre une photo de Pékin, par exemple. Voir tout cela, non plus seulement l’intellectualiser, ça change quelque chose… L’écologie, c’est bien, c’est important. Mais il est difficile de se représenter les problèmes, leur échelle nous dépasse. Là, j’ai vu, j’ai ressenti avec mes sens. Mince, c’est vrai, c’est là!

Risquer sa vie en allant dans l’espace fait réfléchir à ce qui est réellement important. J’aimerais que tous les décideurs de la planète voient le spectacle de la Terre depuis l’espace. Il n’y a pas de frontières. Il est extrêmement difficile de distinguer un pays d’un autre. La Terre n’est ni plus ni moins qu’un gros vaisseau spatial aux ressources limitées, avec un équipage de 7 milliards de personnes. La seule chose à faire, c’est de voyager en bonne intelligence et d’entretenir le vaisseau, comme nous le faisons avec l’ISS, pour que le voyage continue. Sinon, ça va s’arrêter très vite. Dans quelques centaines d’années, peut-être…»
lemonde.fr

Une Terre Si Fragile
Par Thomas Pesquet
© ESA / NASA

à voir dans Animan N201

In conversation with Peter Cox

Peter Cox left behind the heady world of IT infrastructure design in the United States to return to his native Ireland, where he is now a full-time professional landscaper. A gallery owner and workshop leader, he is also passionate about technological innovation and has become a leading light in drone photography…
Interview by Nick Smith

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In conversation with Peter Cox
more in Outdoor Photography – September 2017