Colourful Architecture

I would like to see your best photos of colourful architecture. Images could show the whole building or a closer view of just part of the building. People and other elements may also be present but the colourful architecture should be the main focus. The architecture may be new or old and may be one colour or several. As usual in my contests creativity will be rewarded as well as innovation. Obviously only colour images are allowed.

Red door
by Vladimir Polivanov
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Doors
by Gloria Matyszyk
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Untitled
by farshidashkar
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Raincoats
by mtfeher
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2606 Chinese Laundry
by Paule Hjertaas
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Colourful Architecture
more at photocrowd

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Light blue colors

Winning images from the “Light blue colors” competition.

Urmia Lake
by ramin
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В ледяном плену
by Шабанов Сергей
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by Савин Андрей
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by Krier Guy
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by dilyana dimova
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Light blue colors
more at 35 awards

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Autumn Changes

The magical season of Autumn serves up some of the richest and most comforting scenes in the entire natural world. As trees shed their leaves and the luscious greens of summer morph into warm reds and browns, we’re taking a look through the archives to find a selection of spectacular Fall images.

‘Autumn Deer’ by Robert Booth
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‘Misty Waters’ by Peter, SONY ILCE-7RM2, 70-200mm F2.7, 1/6, f/8, ISO 160
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‘Olivia’ by Laura Dawe, NIKON D610, 35.0 mm f/1.4, 1/250, f/2.2, ISO 500
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‘The Autumn Walk’ by Stuart Lilley Photography, NIKON D7100, 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, 1/40, f/5.6, ISO 100
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‘Looking at the fall foliage’ by Patosan, NIKON D850, 70.0-200.0 mm f/2.8, 1/100, f/11, ISO 360
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more in: “Autumn Changes – 15 Spectacular Images Of The Fall”
at photocrowd

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Infrared | Helen Bradshaw

Helen Bradshaw Photography

Artists’ Statement
The ability to freeze a moment of time and preserve its essence so that others can cherish the emotions which it invokes within oneself is why I am fascinated with photography. I aim to do more than simply capture pieces of time; I aspire to shape these images in such a way that they will enrapture the mind and soul of any who lay eyes upon them.

Everyday of our lives, we awaken to a realm teeming with surreal scenery, yet, most people’s lives are too busy to fully appreciate the artistry that surrounds them. Therefore, I strive to capture that beauty in my work with stunning color combinations and clear, simple composition. Personally, I feel that my photographs are most successful, when, not only do they exhibit visual beauty, but also inspire an emotional connection with anyone who sees them. I endeavor to have my photographs draw people in and allow them to experience a mystical world that is not often seen.

Nature contains a rich variety of scenery just waiting to be made into something magical. For all the work involved in finding the perfect image, a truly mesmerizing photograph is one to treasure. Without the outlook of artist, it would be nigh impossible to achieve such marvelous representations of Mother Nature’s radiant beauty.

When I work, I prefer to keep all aspects of my composition in the most straightforward and natural form as is attainable. Long before I click the shutter of the camera, I have envisioned how the image will be received.
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Infrared | Helen Bradshaw
via kolarivision

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This dreamy Arctic scene won National Geographic’s Travel Photo Contest

Meet the photographer behind the grand prize—winning photo and learn how it was taken.

On a stormy spring day, crisp winds blew across the snowy peaks outside Upernavik, Greenland. Locals considered the balmy -30°C temperature a warm March evening, so they scampered to run errands under the setting sun. Photographer Weimin Chu had settled on a slope near the airport with views of colorful homes below.

Hoping to photograph a person strolling or children playing in the landscape, he was excited to see a small family making their way under the streetlights instead. Working with precision in the low light, he captured the image he had envisioned—and the grand prize of the 2019 National Geographic Travel Photo Contest.
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Photographer Weimin Chu describes the “wow moment” that led to his stunning image.
more by Sarah Polger at National Geographic

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