Rainbow City by Cristobal Serrano

I flew my drone high above the huge flocks of lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at the muddy banks of Lake Bogoria (Kenya), where they find their favourite food, cyanobacteria of the spirulina genus, in the alkaline water of the lake. Because of the dry season, minerals and salts from the volcanic subsoil are highly concentrated, creating an explosion of rich colours that is visible from the air. The pink colour of the flamingos perfectly complemented the colour range of the great artist Mother Earth.
DJI Inspire 2 + Zenmuse X5s, Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 2.0/12mm(24mm), ISO 100

The Society of German Nature Photographers (GDT) presents the award-winning images of the competition ‘European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018’ – Cristobal Serrano from Spain is this year’s overall winner with an aerial photograph of lesser flamingos at Lake Bogoria.
more at gdtfoto.de

Seven Tips to Rule the Skies

Drone photography is an amazing niche that’s worth exploring, especially if you want to take your photography to new heights—literally and figuratively. From your first flight to shooting something original, pro droner Petra Leary shares her tips for sensational shots from the sky.

Camera Settings
Learn the basics of photography first. Before you even take to the air, set the camera to shoot manual and RAW. Sure, you can pull your drone right out the box and get a great image, but learning how shutter speeds work with aperture and ISO is key to developing your style and improving your photography.

Composition
Height isn’t everything. Although super high drone shots might have the ‘wow’ factor, sometimes you need to think about what you are trying to capture. Does your framing require everything you can see or do you get a more effective shot by framing just the necessary elements?

Lighting
Like in every type of photography, lighting is key. Learn about how the effects of the sun at different times of day effect your shot, as well as how shadows and objects change with light. My favorite times of day to shoot are during the first 2 -3 hours of sunlight and again during the last couple of hours before sunset.

Seven Tips to Rule the Skies
more in Australian Photography Magazine – November 2018

Terminus by Reuben Wu

I travelled to Peru in July 2018 with the intention of continuing my Lux Noctis project at Pastoruri, one of the few glaciers that still exist at the tropics in the Cordillera Blanca at an altitude of 17,000ft.
This glacier is receding at a shocking rate due to climate change and as a result there has been a huge drop in tourism and an impact on the local community.

Lux Noctis, my larger project, is about presenting familiar sights in a new and unfamiliar light, renewing your sense of seeing and the experience of discovery. However, with this series, I felt like this was an attempt to document and preserve the memory of a landscape in peril which may not exist in a decade.

At 17,000ft, it was a physical challenge to reach the glacier, compounded by the fact that I was shooting at night and under freezing conditions. For this expedition, I was accompanied by a production company (Courageous Studio) who were shooting a short film on my work for Great Big Story, sponsored by Coors Lite, and they assisted in all the research, scouting, and getting me out to the glacier safely.
Flying the drone at this altitude presented a number of problems. Firstly, the cold made me lose sensation in my fingers, so it was difficult to control the lighting at the same time as the camera. The cold also significantly shortened battery life, and limited my flight time. Being out in a remote wilderness meant that there was no way I could recharge my batteries, so there was only so much time I had to shoot.

I photographed the glacier with conflicting feelings. I wanted to show evidence of its alarming retreat, yet I was drawn to the epic scale of the ice which remained. In the end I leaned towards the latter, but each photograph represents a bleak reality, a fading memory of what once stood.
Reuben Wu
more at Behance

Shanghai From Above

These magnificent views of Shanghai from above were taken by drone by German design director Mark Siegemund, who presents the juxtaposition of tradition and modernity of this dynamic city in a series of breathtaking images. A river divides the old center from the new, and we are treated to views of the ancient winding streets, mid-level housing, temples and dizzying bridges of Puxi, as well as the soaring high-rise buildings and towers of the Pudong business district. Whether shot at night or bathed in morning light, Siegemund’s photography captures the energy and vibrancy of his adopted city.

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more from “Breathtaking Views of Shanghai From Above”
by Mark Siegemund

at Fubiz

Work every angle

Dutch-Ecuadorian photographer Cris Toala Olivares is one of the new breed of young photographers carving out an eclectic career. He is fascinated by natural phenomena and engineered natural wonders, which he documents from helicopters and with drones as well as from the ground. His comprehensive work on volcanic eruptions, the Wadden Sea and Amsterdam’s canal belt speak to the beauty of working every angle. But as Cris explains to CPN Web Editor Deniz Dirim, to reach new heights you need to be business-savvy first…

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Work every angle
Cris Toala Olivares

more at Canon

Earth From Above

Explore our awe-inspiring planet, continent by continent, through incredible images captured from the air by the likes of drones and satellites…

The pearls of Bahrain
Shaped like an ornate necklace, the Durrat Al-Bahrain islands are an artificial archipelago, whose name translates as ‘the most perfect pearl’. To create the 20km2 of new land off the south-east coast of Bahrain, 34 million cubic metres of material was dredged from the seafloor of the Persian Gulf. The islands are like mini towns with luxury homes, shopping malls and schools.
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The land of extremes
The rich red-orange sand dunes of the Namib Desert stretch inland towards the Naukluft Mountains. Most moisture from the Atlantic falls as rain near the coast, yet some rolls across the arid desert as fog, quenching wildlife and oxidising the iron in the sand dunes to create their red colour. Highland water flows down the Kuiseb River greening the land to the north. In the south, as the Tsondab River hits the desert, water evaporates, leaving behind white salt and mineral deposits.
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The great desert
This shot of part of t he Sahara in Western Libya was captured by EarthKAM – a NASA programme where students from all over the world can ask for images to be taken from the International Space Station of specific locations on Earth. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, with northeasterly winds that can reach hurricane levels, and as little as 2.5cm of rain on average each year.
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Island birth
The world’s youngest island, Nishinoshima, is made up of two sections which formed over 60 years apart. The lower section was created in 1973 when an underwater volcano erupted, while the upper part first broke through the ocean’s surface in November 2013, merging with its neighbour soon after. Every day, the island produces 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of lava.
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At the heart of green energy
Over 4,000 mirrors direct sunlight to a boiler in a central tower at the Khi Solar One power plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. At full capacity the boiler heats up to a toasty 530ºC. The plant began commercial operation in February 2016, and supplies energy to around 45,000 homes.
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more in:
Earth from Above
Our planet as you’ve never seen it before

Part of the BBC Focus Magazine Collection

The winners of the 4th annual International Drone Photography Contest

Thousands of entries were submitted from everywhere in the world by talented professional photographers and amateur drone photo enthusiasts.
The competition was judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts including National Geographic Deputy Director Patrick Witty and Photo editor Jeff Heimsath as well as Emanuela Ascoli, Photo editor of National Geographic France and Dronestagram.
We have decided to create this year a special category, named “Creativity” to reward the amazing creativity of our talented community.

Two Moo by LukeMaximoBell
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1st Prize Winner – Nature: Provence, summer trim by jcourtial
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1st Prize Winner – Category People: End of the line by Martin Sanchez
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1st Prize Winner – Category Urban: Concrete Jungle by bachirm
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2nd Prize Winner – Category Urban: Dawn on Mercury Tower by alexeygo
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2nd Prize Winner – Nature: Infinite Road to Transylvania by Calin Stan
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2nd Prize Winner – Category People: Waterlily by helios1412
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The winners of the 4th annual International Drone Photography Contest
via dronestagram