Wonderful Creative Use of a Frame in the Composition

The use of a frame, in a photographic composition, is powerful and generally easy to spot. A well placed frame can direct your viewers eyes right to the subject of your image.

“Beauty of the Cathedral Cove at Coromandel NZ” by Anupam Hatui
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“Israel, the Roman Upper Aqueduct In Caesarea” by Hanan Isachar
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“Lisboa” by Alex Rocio
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“La Giralda, Sevilla” by Hans Zúñiga Rojas
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“The Cat” by Diogo Narciso
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more from: “32 Photos that Demonstrate the Wonderful Creative Use of a Frame in the Composition”
at gurushots

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The Art Of Seeing

In this three-part article series, we take a deep dive into the fundamentals of composing landscape photographs
Text & Photography By Marc Muench

There’s a magical moment in landscape photography when you find the right position, the subject is at the correct angle, bathed in perfect light, and, with your camera in hand, you capture “The Shot”—the perfect composition for the scene. These are the moments we all want to repeat, but for whatever reason, they are difficult to find. The more you learn about how much goes into creating such moments, the more you realize just how complex and involved they are to repeat.

This is the “Art of Seeing.”

I break the process of seeing down into three elements that I call the “creative trinity.” Subject, light and composition make up the trinity, and the fuel that fires it is timing.

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The Art Of Seeing
more at Outdoor Photographer

part 1part 2part 3

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Exquisitely Composed Photos That Each Tell A Unique Story

Have you spent much time thinking about the nature of composition in a photograph? Consider this… when you begin the process of creating a photograph something has caught your attention. That “something” seems worthy of capture and to pass onto others (your viewers). The problem is the “others” aren’t there with you when take the photograph. They didn’t see and feel the scene as you did. Composition is the tool that helps you convey that silent message to a viewer who is perhaps thousands and thousands of miles away.

“are you Talking to Me ? ” by ilias Orfanos
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“Jinx Cosplay” by Amanda Café
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“Half light in the forest” by Luís Rodrigues
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“Dark Clouds” by Christian Giger Photography
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“Fishermen hanging their fishing tools ” by Nguyen Quoc Thang
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Exquisitely Composed Photos That Each Tell A Unique Story
more at gurushots

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Natural Framing In Landscape Photography

Use framing to direct the viewer’s attention to a specific location within the composition.

Natural framing is a popular technique in landscape photography where the photographer deliberately places the primary subject in a position where accompanying elements surround it, highlight it or call attention to it. A connection between the objects framing the subject and the subject itself should exist. The goal of the frame is to direct the viewer’s attention to a specific location within the composition. It unifies the primary focal point with natural or man-made objects that surround it. These objects add a sense of depth and also help identify the environment in which the image was created.

Text & Photography by Russ Burden
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Natural Framing In Landscape Photography
more at Outdoor Photographer

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Point of View

Not all photographs need to be taken from our eye level – nor should they.
Changing your viewpoint is not only a great way to enhance composition, but it might also make your photograph stand out from all of the other eye-level views made of a similar subject.
Use your freedom to your aesthetic advantage and make images from creative viewpoints.

by Asle Haukland
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by Nathalia Nigro
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by Elena Karetina
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by Andy Fowlie
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by Kishor Patel
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Point of View Challenge
more at GuruShots

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Portraits with Depth

For this people photo contest we invited you to share your best portraits that have a clear composition using depth of field

Congratulations Grand Jury Winner “The elephant sean bone in the little girl hands ” by amaliazilio
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Congratulations Runner Up “Pathfinder ” by Ethos
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Congratulations Runner Up “23115088724_71290e2743_k ” by stephenpapageorge
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Congratulations Runner Up “Lighting the Way ” by benjaminfoote
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Congratulations People’s Choice “Vika ” by ilyayakover
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Portraits With Depth Photo Contest Winners
more at viewbug

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8 Tips to Improve your Winter Compositions

“I have a love-hate relationship with winter. I won’t get into why I hate winter (too cold, short days, high heating bills, driving sucks… okay, so I got into it a bit). For photography however, I love winter. Once the autumn leaves hit the ground and everything looks dull and grey, I find myself dreaming of winter. There’s nothing like a fresh blanket of snow to brighten up a landscape scene. And that same landscape can look quite different from day to day considering how variable the weather and lighting can be during the winter.

Is winter photography really any different from that of other seasons? Yes, and no. The basics of landscape photograph apply regardless of the season, but my approach and preparedness can be different in the winter. Here are some tips that might help you improve your winter compositions…”
By Peter Baumgarten, Olympus Visionary

Focus on winter’s unique features
Play in the snow
Look for color contrasts
Shoot at the bookends of the day
Control the blues
Photograph people
Make your own point of interest
Focus in on the details
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8 Tips to Improve your Winter Compositions
By Peter Baumgarten
more at Olympus