Kuwait: A Desert on Fire | Sebastião Salgado

Kuwait: A Desert on Fire
by Sebastião Salgado

Nicholas Metivier Gallery is pleased to present its third solo exhibition with internationally renowned documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado. The exhibition coincides with the release of Salgado’s new book, Sebastião Salgado – Kuwait: A Desert on Fire, published TASCHEN. The exhibition will open on May 4th and run until May 27th with and opening reception on Thursday, May 4th. Kuwait: A Desert on Fire is a featured exhibition for the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

In April 1991, following the end of the First Gulf War, Sebastião Salgado travelled to Kuwait on assignment for the New York Times Magazine. Over 600 oil wells had been set ablaze by Iraqi forces after their occupation of Kuwait was thwarted by a US-led coalition. The region was in the midst of one of the worst man-made environmental catastrophes in recent history. Firefighters from around the globe, including the Safety Boss Team from Calgary, Alberta, had been sent to Kuwait to cap the wells and put out the massive fires.

Arriving in the Ahmadi Oil Fields, 20 miles south west of Kuwait City, Salgado came across a desert engulfed in flames, covered in oil and smothered in a thick black smoke. For one month, Salgado documented this apocalyptic landscape and the firefighters that worked relentlessly, despite the horrendous conditions. At the end of each day, the firefighters would bathe themselves in a man-made lake with gasoline and detergent to cleanse their oil-soaked bodies. Salgado carried a water bottle filled with gasoline to remove the oil from his hands and camera lens, prior to taking his photographs.

During his time in Kuwait, Salgado engaged with the firefighters, gaining their trust and respect. This is evidenced by the remarkable candidness shown by the men in his black and white photographs. Salgado was inspired by the firefighters’ professionalism and spirit. To him, they were the true heroes of the First Gulf War.  Salgado’s images are surreal reminders of the devastation suffered in Kuwait as a result of war and pay homage to the men who worked to contain the disaster.

A selection of photographs from Kuwait were published in a feature for The New York Times Magazine in 1991 and were part of Salgado’s photographic essay, Workers (1993). The majority of the photographs were archived and never released.  In 2016, the complete project was revisited to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the First Gulf War.

Born in Brazil in 1944, Salgado has been the recipient of numerous photographic prizes in recognition of his accomplishments, including the Gold Medal Award for Photography from the National Arts Club in New York. Several books have been published on Salgado’s work including Workers, Migrations and Genesis. Salgado was part of the well-known cooperative agency, Magnum Photos, for 15 years before founding his own agency, Amazonas images, in Paris with his wife Léila Wanick Salgado. Since 2013, Genesis has been touring to leading museums around the world including the British Museum, London, UK; International Centre of Photography, New York; Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris; Ara Pacis Museum, Rome and the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. A 2015 documentary film on the life and work of Salgado, The Salt of The Earth, debuted at the Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award. Most recently, Salgado was appointed to the prestigious Académie des Beaux-Arts of the Institut de France.

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Kuwait: A Desert on Fire
by Sebastião Salgado

more at Metivier Gallery

Monochrome Photography

Monochrome Photography Awards conducts an annual competition for professional and amateur photographers. Our mission is to celebrate monochrome visions and discover the most amazing photographers from around the world.
The winners of the Professional and Amateur categories will receive the titles: Monochrome Photographer of the Year and Monochrome Discovery of the Year along with cash prizes. We are open to all points of view, all levels of expertise, and all ideas of black and white photography.

Monochrome Awards Winners’ Gallery

Torre di Pisa by Ronny Behnert (Germany)
1st Place Winner – Architecture Photographer of the Year 2016
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The magic of the night by Isabella Tabacchi (Italy)
Landscapes – 2nd Place Winner
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Cleaning the Buddha by Gunarto Gunawan (Indonesia)
Conceptual – 3rd Place Winner
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Vertical Horizon by Michel Kirch (France)
Fine Art – 1st Place Winner
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Humanity by john gubertini (Italy)
Nature – 2nd Place Winner
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Entre Noir Et Blanc by Patrick Ems (Switzerland)
Abstract – 1st Place Winner
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In anticipation of a wonderful evening at the Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1931 in New York by Fierz Madeleine-Josephine (Switzerland)
Fashion / Beauty – 1st Place Winner
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The shepherd by azzam alshuaibi (Kuwait)
People – 2nd Place Winner
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Artemis by Andris Apsenieks (Latvia)
Nude – 1st Place Winner
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Monochrome Awards Winners’ Gallery
more at monoawards

Generation Wealth | Lauren Greenfield

Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present Lauren Greenfield’s incredible documentary project and newly released monograph, Generation Wealth (Phaidon 2017). Acclaimed documentary photographer and filmmaker Lauren Greenfield has been working for the past twenty-five years to chronicle a previously unprecedented global obsession with wealth and materialism. Remarkable in scope and depth, from Moscow high society to Atlanta strip club royalty, Greenfield’s photographs explore the desire for more and succeed in revealing gender dynamics, cult of celebrity, consumerism, power of sex and marketing, and their eventual consequences. Generation Wealth is an especially timely and pertinent body of work that serves as a visual timeline tracing the rise, and fall, and rise of the pursuit of wealth in America.

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Generation Wealth
by Lauren Greenfield

more at Fahey/Kline Gallery

Pictures Of Russia You’ll Never See On Postcards

Photographer Alexander Petrosyan has spent years and years discovering and documenting infinite layers of St. Petersburg. His wide collection – not only beautiful, but also grotesque – invites outsiders to step inside the raw and unpredictable streets and experience them without a filter, common for polished postcards or travel documentaries.

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from: “10+ Honest Pictures Of Russia You’ll Never See On Postcards By Street Photographer Alexander Petrosyan”

more at Bored Panda

Urbanistan

In today’s frenetic, urbanized world of consumption and speed, these photographs find and create spaces of contemplation and peace—moments that allow you to take a breather from the city—any city.
Photographs and text by Matjaz Krivic

As soon as you hear the word “Urbanistan,” your imagination is whisked off into the traffic mayhem of Calcutta; the tawdriness of the neon-sex nightlife in Bangkok; the unbelievablely structured—yet simultaneously frenzied—Tokyo; the suffocating and dusty streets of the (hardly) living body of decaying Cairo; the roundabout of the hedonistic and aggressive Rio, the unstoppable, narcissistic Manhattan. In short, the global supermarket of turbo consumerism.
However, Matjaž Krivic’s “Urbanistan” is a miraculous anti-thesis to all this. It is a story from the other side—a story of the quiet loudness on the margins of total existential, religious, economic and geopolitical chaos. A story that speaks of the indestructible spirit and the eternal search of inspiration that enables survival.
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Urbanistan by Matjaz Krivic
more at Lens Culture

Aztec Dancer

An Aztec Dancer, in full ceremonial costume, is absolutely awe-inspiring. Photographing one of these figures is an unforgettable experience.

The dance that could not be suppressed
The Spanish conquistadors attempted to destroy as much pre-hispanic culture as they could but, try as they might, they could not suppress the powerful Aztec Mitote dance. The dance, dubbed the Conchero dance by the Spanish, has strong ties with military conflict. Aztec princes and lords, dressed in their finery, would perform the dance to relate stories of great battles past. The stories continue to this day, passed down from generation to generation. This lineage system has protected the dance’s sacred heritage and cultural significance.

Based near Puerto Vallarta, a major outpost of the former Aztec Empire. We have established strong ties with the local Conchero community. It is these ties which enabled us to develop an unforgettable photographic and cultural experience. Our Aztec 1-on-1 Workshop.

Aztec Dancer Photography Workshop
more at JP Stones Photography

JP Stones Photography Workshops has as its primary goal to bring together, in a 1-on-1 tuition environment, photographers with the fascinating culture and folkloric figures of Mexico and South America.
We are based on Mexico’s Pacific Coast but owned by a British (JP Stones) and Australian (Brei Barron) couple with over 25 years of Photography and Event Management Experience.

Jean-Luc Grossmann | Burning Man

Burning Man is my first project under the name “PlanetVisible”, a side collaboration with two Zurich based photographer friends, Justin Hession and Pascal Richard. When deciding on a project we wanted something that was cultural, spiritual, unreal, uncommon as well as visual with a strong storytelling opportunity. We wanted something to discover and explore, but most importantly it needed to be something we were free to uncover as individuals. We wanted a project that gave the possibility of working on the same theme but interpreting it with our own self-expression, then seeing how these three viewpoints came together as one.

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Burning Man
Interview with Jean-Luc Grossmann

more in Adore Noir Magazine