World in Focus | The Ultimate Travel Photography Competition

Take a trip around the world with this year’s World in Focus winners! Congratulations to professional grand-prize winner Blaine Harrington III, and amateur grand-prize winner Jacob Wallwork.

“Zojila Pass, Kashmir: one of the most dangerous roads in the world.”
GRAND PRIZE
Blaine Harrington III
Littleton, CO, United States
Sheep and goats are herded over the Zojila Pass as a traffic jam idles trucks because of a landslide in Kashmir, India.
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“UNTITLED”
GRAND PRIZE
Jacob Wallwork
Perth, WA, Australia
The photographer captured this photo from his hotel window in Colombo, Sri Lanka. “I will never forget how casually men, [who were] in business suits and holding briefcases, were hanging out of the open doors and onto the side of the packed trains as they sped towards Colombo main station in the early morning rush hour,” he says.
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Professional : Outdoor Scenes
“White Water”
FIRST PLACE
Karim Iliya
Haiku, HI, United States
A bird’s-eye view of a surfer paddling back out through a churned-up impact zone to catch another wave.
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Amateur : Outdoor Scenes
“Swan Lake”
FIRST PLACE
Kellie Netherwood
London, London, United Kingdom
Whooper swans swim across a small section of water in Hokkaido, Japan.
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Amateur : Sense of Place
“Iceland”
FIRST PLACE
Anil Sud
Winnipeg, MB, Canada
A couple looking over the thermal vents in Iceland.
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Professional : Outdoor Scenes
“Mauna Kea ”
Stuart Chape
Apia, n/a, Samoa
An aerial photo taken from a helicopter featuring the winding access road leading to the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii.
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Amateur : Outdoor Scenes
“Lone Traveler”
Evan B. Siegel
Newport Coast, CA, United States
The Kodak Passage in the Antarctic Peninsula.
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World in Focus | The Ultimate Travel Photography Competition
more at World in Focus Contest

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Mono World

Mono World | The online leading photography magazine. Worldwide photography inspirations.

Mountain Road by Igor Debevec
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Seoul Design Plaza by Pedro Bonay
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In Paris by Osvaldo Ghirardi
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Download by Hugues Hardy
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Lindisfarne View by Steve Cheetham
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Glencoe Lochan by John Starkey
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Black and White 04 – Mono World – Camerapixo photography magazine
Nature, Architecture, Portrait, Travel, Documentary …

more at issuu

Baloo and Henry

This Cat And Dog Love Travelling Together, And Their Pictures Are Absolutely Epic.
Avid hikers Cynthia Bennett and her boyfriend adopted their dog Henry back in 2014. At first Bennett was going to pick a golden retriever mix, but then she came across Henry at an adoption event. He was only 14 weeks old, but already five times bigger than the other puppies of the same age. When she entered Henry’s pen he just curled up into her lap, went belly up and flipped his head over her arm. That was when she knew he was the one. …

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Baloo and Henry
continue at Bored Panda

Mirrors. Mountains

Mirrors. Mountains
by Mikolaj Gospodarek, Photographer, Studio Incognito

About Me
My adventure with landscape photography began many years ago during the mountain climbing and hiking in Poland. I decided to show the beauty of the world around me by photographs, which after a few years turned into my profession and way of life. For 8 years I have worked in the St. Paul Edition as a photographer and photo editor. I have had many trips abroad performing materials in a variety of conditions – on the Alpine summits and wild shores of the Mediterranean islands. Each photographic expedition is a wonderful adventure and full of amazing experiences struggle – the struggle for the image of the painting quiet light of the world, which does not really exist, because after a while it is only a memory, but thanks to the subtleties of photos I can share it with audiences around the world.

more at Behance

Top 10 Compact Cameras for Travelers

Upgrade your travel photos with these lightweight cameras that pack a punch.

Nat Geo Travel asked Tom O’Brien, photo engineer for National Geographic Magazine, to share his top picks for must-have compact cameras. These cameras are perfect for both traveling light and making incredible photos. Read about his favorites and start planning your next trip!
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Fujifilm X-T2
For the traveler who wants the best model overall
Pick for Travelers: Over a year old now but the X-T2 still maintains its prowess of imaging excellence. The camera has everything one would want in a professional DSLR in a APS-C mirrorless camera. The combination of quality manual dials to control settings, speed of image processing, the amazing line lenses and the build quality make this camera such a pleasure to use that many professionals now use this camera as their main system. You simply cannot go wrong with the X-T2 as a high end travel camera; it’s an all-star, all-around team player that just won’t quit or let you down, no matter where your travels take you.
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Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II
For the technologically-demanding traveler
Pick for Travelers: The E-M1 Mk II is in the writer’s opinion the most technologically impressive camera on this list. In a package that is considerably smaller than professional DSLR cameras Olympus has placed imaging technologies that allow for mind-bending capture rates (both mechanical and electronic shutter speeds are class leading). The E-M1 MKII is easily the most weather sealed interchangeable lens camera on the market; I took it canoeing in the Florida springs and a few times splashed water directly onto the camera, it didn’t skip a beat. Olympus has legendary autofocus, allowing for sharp, fast, and accurate focusing on targets of all types and speeds. This means whether you find yourself at an air show shooting soaring planes or photographing a local parade of dancers at dusk, this camera will lock tightly to subjects. This is a truly versatile travel camera.
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Sony a6500
For the app-loving traveler
Pick for Travelers: The a6000 series has become increasing popular with those looking to capitalize on Sony specific technologies while maintaining a very compact and relatively affordable camera; the a6500 is a the latest in this line. The a6500 is great for those that understands the shortcomings of the current generation of E-mount Sony cameras but wish to enter into the ever expanding Sony Alpha universe to reap the benefits of their sensor technologies. The a6500 is exceptionally compact and light for the sensor and technology is packs in. The shear popularity of this camera speaks to volumes about Sony imaging technology. In this iteration you will find a powerful 425-point phase detection autofocus system and an extended shooting buffer.
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Olympus TG-5
For the water-loving traveler
Pick for Travelers: The Olympus TG-5 continues its line’s legacy as a top choice for a tough camera and entry level underwater camera. This iteration of the TG line makes an interesting design change from its predecessor, it has downsized its pixel count from 16 MP to 12 MP. To most this seems like an odd decision but in fact it is a move to increase the low light performance of the sensor. By reducing the pixel count, the pixels can be larger and thus gather light more efficiently, giving better performance in dim conditions such as underwater or at dusk. Make no mistake though, the sensor size is still ample for posting to the web and smaller prints. As usual the TG line of cameras, the TG -5 is the leader of the pack in tough cameras.
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Top 10 Compact Cameras for Travelers
By Tom O’Brien
Photographs by Mark Thiessen

more at National Geographic

Black and White Photography – Rita Scarola

Rita Scarola was born in Grumo Appula in 1990, studied pedagogical subjects and graduated in Political Science at Bari in 2016. During self-taught university studies, she began to be interested in photography, definitively maturing that indissoluble bond with the camera that would accompany her during her many trips around the world. India, Kenya, Turkey, the Balkans, Belarus, are just some of the other worlds that she explored her soul in. Rita pursued the possible dialogue with distant cultures even if it would happen only through a gaze. Eyes, hands, faces, smiles, tears: the quest for detail, for a tale to be told of the real world and for a necessity to immortalize what a naked eye might lose after it moves on and how to see beyond what was visible: a particular moment whose essence the human soul has the duty to seize.

Black and White (B&W) Photography belongs to an altogether different era and the interesting part is that the art form has not only survived all this long, it is thriving with innovations taking place every next time. Seems as if man is finding it difficult to come out of its spell. B&W comes with a rich heritage in the form of works of Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Edward Weston etc, who created masterpieces out of the constraints of equipment, tools and above all – color. But absence of the latter evidently came to their advantage and helped them see what would not be visible in a colored world. Colors dominate frame, its aspects and elements; and so a B&W photographer will rather focus on the potentials of placement, shape, pattern, texture, tonal contrast and above all flow and quality of light.
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Black and White Photography – Rita Scarola
more in WePhoto B&W vol 4

Global Roaming | Chris McLennan

Chris McLennan is a New Zealand based travel photographer who works for tourism industry clients around the globe. He has photographed in over 50 different countries to date and has received a number of internatonal photography awards. He is an ambassador for camera brand Nikon and computng giant HP. He also holds endorsement relatonships with Lexar, Lowepro and AquaTech.

Actually to call him a travel photographer is something of a misnomer, as Chris works across travel related genres such as lifestyle, adventure, wildlife and natural history with equal aplomb. The fact that all of these necessitate travel – because his clients and shoot locatons are spread all over the globe – is perhaps the strongest link. In this feature, we’ve chosen to focus on his lifestyle and adventure imagery.

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Global Roaming by Chris McLennan
more in f11 Magazine – Issue 66