Framing Humanity | Sebastião Salgado

Superlatives are hard to avoid when describing the work of Sebastião Salgado. Recently, one magazine hailed him as the ‘world’s greatest living photographer’ and while such statements are often thoughtlessly attributed to many lesser mortals, it is difficult to argue against such a claim for the Paris-based artist. Now 73, Salgado is renowned for the epic scale of his photographic projects, involving years of planning, travelling and editing, all with a painstaking devotion to create books as heavy as coffee tables and exhibitions that fill the world’s grandest museums.

“I like to photograph large…there is a lot of information inside my pictures. To have information I must give space and to give space I must give depth of field too.”
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Framing Humanity
by Sebastião Salgado

more in Professional Photography – July/August 2017

Wallpapers from the Travel Photographer of the Year Contest 2017

Wallpapers from the Travel Photographer of the Year Contest 2017

Singing in the Rain (or just after)
Photo by Mat Rick
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Flamingos
Photo by Aya O.
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The Fog and Mist in Hong Kong
Photo by Edward Tin
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Monastery Of Light
Photo by Kok Tien Sang
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Yosemite Valley
Photo by Cheyne Walls
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Marble Caves
Photo by clane gessel
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The power of nature
Photo by Sergio Tapiro Velasco
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Wallpapers from the Travel Photographer of the Year Contest 2017
more at National Geographic

Travelling the light fantastic

Lucie Debelkova: living for the dream destination
Top travel photographer and Canon Explorer Lucie Debelkova lives for the thrill of new horizons. She reveals to CPN Editor David Corfield her motivations and vision and how social media, Canon’s EOS 5DS and three EF zoom lenses help her discover and record what she sees…

Canon Explorer Lucie Debelkova discovers new horizons with the EOS 5DS.
more at Canon

Expeditions

Discover the National Geographic Difference
The National Geographic Society was founded upon a passion for discovery and a desire to understand our world on a deeper level. We’ve spent more than a century sending scientists, journalists, and explorers all over the globe to investigate and share the spectacular diversity of our planet. Our expeditions carry on that same spirit—they bring you up close to incredible places with the people who know them best.

Expeditions
more in the National Geographic Travel Catalog 2018

Where the world began: Ngorongoro, Tanzania

Spectacular new safari camps in the Crater Highlands of Tanzania are changing the way we experience this prehistoric phenomenon.
Photos by Tom Parker

Dawn at Entamanu and the world seemed newborn. Mists unfurled from the depths of Ngorongoro Crater. Three giraffes materialised like ghosts from behind acacias. Two golden jackals trotted past, and somewhere a hyena barked as the day, and the world, shed their darkness.

more by Stanley Stewart at Condé Nast Traveller

The Fine Art Of Travel Photography

How does a photographer transcend the “I was here” imagery that’s often associated with travel photography and create fine-art images of places near and far? From the dozens of workshops I’ve taught on the subject, as well as talking with—and carefully studying the work of—many of the great globetrotting lensmen and lenswomen in the field, I’ve developed a methodology that, when applied, should yield impressive and, at times, spectacular results.
Text & Photography By Mark Edward Harris
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NIGHT EXPOSURES: The Matterhorn from Zermatt, Switzerland. Many cities thrive at night and bring a different dimension to the travel experience. For cityscapes and architecture, use a low ISO, lock down the camera on a sturdy tripod, lock up the mirror of an SLR and use a cable release.
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DEPTH OF FIELD: Bonito, Brazil. Shooting at a maximum depth of field can create unique perspectives, especially for stunning architectural shots and landscapes.
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SHOOTING CONTRE-JOUR: Yazd, Iran. Shooting with the sun behind the subject eliminates harsh shadows. In-camera meters can get thrown off by contre-jour situations and underexpose the scene, so it’s important to know how to utilize the camera’s exposure lock and exposure compensation controls.
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SILHOUETTES: Mandalay, Myanmar. Dramatic silhouettes can be shot at any time of the day, but there must be a strong contrast between your background and your subject.
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The Fine Art Of Travel Photography
more at Digital Photo

The Power Of Portable Light

I have traveled 4,625 miles to get this image. I’m stumbling through the volcanic landscape in the murky predawn darkness trying to find the Moai statues. The salty breeze and crashing surf remind me of early-morning shoots in Hawaii. But this isn’t Hawaii. I’m on Easter Island, one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world. And if I don’t get this iconic shot of the Moai statues at sunrise, I’ll never forgive myself. I need this shot for my photo essay of the island.
Text & Photography By Tom Bol
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Moai Statue At Sunset. Nikon D3, 24-70mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot at 1/50 sec. at ƒ/8, Nikon SB-800 used off-camera to light the statue.
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Egypt. Nikon D2X and 17-35mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot with a Nikon SB-800 to add catchlights to the subjects’ eyes in the bright overhead sun.
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TOP: Scotland. Nikon Df and 24-70mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot at 1/100 sec. at ƒ/7.1. In this before shot, the telephone booth appears lifeless without flash. ABOVE: The same gear and settings were used, but by using a single speedlight, the telephone booth comes to life. A Nikon SB-910 was placed in the booth and fired off-camera using a Nikon SU-800 transmitter.
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The Power Of Portable Light
more at Digital Photo Pro