It’s not luck, it’s science: the technical feats behind Audun Rikardsen’s amazing Artic photographs

During the polar nights when the sun never rises, it is just 4°C in the tumultuous, frigid Norwegian Sea. The city of Tromsø is further north than many people ever venture – 350km above the Arctic Circle. These are facts that don’t deter Canon Ambassador Audun Rikardsen. In pursuit of photographs of Nordic wildlife as it has never been seen before, he uses his Canon bodies and trusted L-series lenses in punishing conditions: left for days, weeks and months in snow, sleet, hail and wind.

Some of his photographic success can be attributed to his advanced understanding of animal behaviour and scientist’s access, while some is down to sheer grit; Audun thrives on making the impossible possible. “It’s not luck,” he says of his more remarkable work. Rather, his thirst for great photography is driven by constant dissatisfaction. Leaving his camera in mountain hides for months at a time to capture eagles at their resting places, submerging it in icy waters to photograph whales frolicking and placing it nose-to-lens with polar bears, he achieves captivating shots that educate the masses.

“Have you ever wondered what it feels like to be a fish, looking up at a predator?” Audun asks. It’s lines of inquiry such as this that have led to his more notable images. He often finds that the sights and perspectives he can’t see with his own eyes, he can capture through a skilfully positioned lens.

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It’s not luck, it’s science: the technical feats behind Audun Rikardsen’s amazing Artic photographs

more at canon

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Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

More than 48,000 amateur and professional photographers from 100 countries shared their best shots and a jury of nine experts selected the winners.
The nineteen winners were selected across categories including animal behavior of mammals, birds, and invertebrates, along with animal portraits, plants and fungi, earth’s environment, and special categories for youth and emerging photographers.

Snow-plateau nomads by Shangzhen Fan China. Winner 2019, Animals in Their Environment
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Land of the eagle by Audun Rikardsen, Norway. Winner 2019, Behaviour: Birds.
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Tapestry of life by Zorica Kovacevic, Serbia/USA. Winner 2019, Plants and Fungi
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The huddle by Stefan Christmann, Germany. Winner 2019, Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio Award
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Early riser by Riccardo Marchgiani, Italy. Winner 2019, 15-17 years old
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Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

via this is colossal

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Earth’s Finest Creatures

We culled this amazing selection of photographs from the “Majestic Mammals” challenge. If you’re an aspiring wildlife photographer- you’ll notice some common traits among these images. They are shot tight. People want to see the details of the animal. They have good light. Animal fur needs good light to show off the texture. They are often captured at peak action. Even a sleeping lion can have a moment of peak action!

The Mara Six
by Andy Howe
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photo by Vladimir Cech
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photo by Gal Meiri
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Spring Break
by Bragi Ingibergsson
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photo by Tomáš Svoboda
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more in “39 of Earth’s Finest Creatures”
at gurushots

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Wildlife Photography by Brooke Bartleson

Brooke is a wildlife photographer based out of Silverthorne, Colorado. She has always been a lover of animals, and when she first began shooting she was naturally hooked on photographing wildlife right from the start. Her ultimate goal is to photograph all the core species of megafauna found in North America. When Brooke is not actively photographing, tracking, or scouting for wildlife, you can find her snowboarding at the Colorado ski resort where she works.

“I got started in photography shortly after I graduated from college when I moved up to the mountains. The mountains seem to be a haven for people with big dreams and wild passions. The adventurousness of big dreaming mountain folks was contagious, and I finally picked up my camera which had been collecting dust for about a year. It felt good to have something motivating me to go outside and push myself, and once I discovered my knack for photographing wildlife I realized there was nothing else on earth I’d rather be doing.
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Wildlife Photography by Brooke Bartleson
more at Olympus

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The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

We are delighted to announce the 40 fantastic finalists from the 2019 competition, which has been an absolute treat for the judges with possibly the best entries we have ever had.
The Overall Winner and Category Winners will be announced on …. 13th November 2019.

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The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards, ingeniously titled to avoid any confusion, was the result of two factors: Firstly, a need for a photography competition that was light hearted, upbeat, possibly unpretentious and mainly about wildlife doing funny things. 4years on and these objectives seem to have been met. Secondly, and way more importantly, this competition is about conservation.

more at comedy wildlife photo

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Affection

We know. Many photographers sigh at the amount of image manipulation that occurs these days. Today, we take a break. These shots of pets, along with their owners, reveal the true, unbiased , and unmanipulated level of affection that can occur between a human and beast. You’re gonna love it!

photo by IrisA
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photo by Elisha Henkin
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photo by Anett Toth
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photo by Elena Luria
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photo by Pasji horizont
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from “43 Real Photos of Affection”
more at gurushots

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