Filter holders | Testbench Round-Up

If you’re serious about landscape photography, you’ll need some drop-in flters. James Abbott looks at some of the best flter holder options available.

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Filter holders | Testbench Round-Up
via Amateur Photographer Magazine

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Super-Telephoto Zooms: Canon vs Fujifilm vs Nikon vs Pentax vs Sigma vs Sony vs Tamron

Whether you’re shooting sports, wildlife or something else altogether, sometimes a standard telephoto zoom lens just can’t get you close enough to the action. A supertelephoto zoom lens will extend your reach signifcantly – and there are plenty to choose from.

A zoom range of around 100-400mm has long been a popular option to include in lens ranges (there are four included here), but some manufacturers have been pushing the envelope, super-sizing focal lengths to as much as 600mm.

Apart from the Fujiflm X-mount lens, all of the contenders in this group are fully compatible with both full-frame and cropsensor cameras. Naturally if you fit them to an APS-C format camera, you can extend your effective reach even further, with a 1.5x multiplication effect (1.6x for Canon cameras). Typical attractions include fast autofocus systems and optical image stabilisation, but there can be notable differences in features and performance. Let’s take a look at what’s on offer…

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Matthew Richards tests the leading lenses for bumping up your telephoto reach
The Contenders
1. Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM
2. Fujiflm 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR
3. Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR
4. Pentax 150-450mm f/4.5-5.6 ED DC AW HD
5. Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C
6. Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S
7. Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 OSS G Master
8. Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2

via Digital Camera World

Five steps to discovering Fujifilm’s unique X-Trans technology

One of the most overlooked aspects of a camera is its ability to render colour, so this month we take a look at Fujifilm’s X-Trans III sensor & Film Simulation modes.

If you’re like us, then you’ll know how important it is to be able to get your shot as close to perfect in-camera as you can. Often, people take that to mean a well exposed image, strong composition and a good white balance, but Fujifilm always aim to take it one step further than the competition.

Thanks to the X-Trans III sensor, found in the current line-up of X Series cameras, such as the X-Pro2, X-T20, X100F and the X-T2, you can be certain that your colours will look near-perfect as soon as you hit the shutter button. It’s all thanks to the amazing technology at play behind the X-Trans CMOS sensor, which is based on a traditional Bayer colour filter array, but with a few very important and noticeable tweaks made by Fujifilm’s R&D department, which we will be taking a look at here.

Fujifilm also has the wildly popular and exceptional Film Simulation modes, which dig deep into its heritage as one of the world’s leading film manufacturers (a heritage which has been going since the company’s creation in 1934, when they aimed to be the first Japanese film manufacturer, creating anything from motion picture to microfilm and everything in between). These simulations are comparable to those that you’d find on many cameras, usually referred to as Picture Controls of Scene Modes, except they boast a far more impressive punch and evoke some of the finest moments of Fujifilm’s filmic history. These simulations include such iconic film recipes as Provia, Velvia, Classic Chrome and the newest edition, the black & white powerhouse, ACROS. With such an impressive resume of colour credentials, we’re now taking a deeper look at Fujifilm’s X-Trans sensor and amazing Film Simulation modes, to find out how they have created this technology and used it to manufacture some of the best cameras on the market.

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Five steps to discovering Fujifilm’s unique X-Trans technology
via Practical Photography – October 2017

Super-Tele Zooms

Super-size your telephoto reach with a monster zoom lens. Matthew Richards searches out the best buys for your Canon camera.

Sometimes a standard telephoto lens can simply come up short. A typical 70-300mm zoom can lack sufficient telescopic reach when you’re shooting anything from birds in the garden to animals in the wild, or from sporting events to air shows. For greater reach, you’ll need a longer lens with more pulling power.

Over the next few pages, we’ll compare all of the latest super-telephoto zoom lenses currently manufactured to fit Canon DSLRs. Sizes go from large to enormous, and there’s an even broader spread of prices. However, all of them stretch to a focal length of at least 400mm, and some go extra-long to as much as 600mm. They’re also all fully compatible with both full-frame and APS-C format camera bodies. The latter gives a 1.6x crop factor, further boosting the effective telephoto reach.

A perennial problem, when shooting at such long focal lengths, is camera-shake. It’s therefore no surprise that every current super-telephoto zoom lens on the market for Canon cameras has optical image stabilization built in. They also feature fast and whisper-quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus systems. Even so, when it comes to additional features and build quality, there are major differences between some of the lenses on test. Let’s take a closer look…

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Super-Tele Zooms by Matthew Richards

Canon vs Sigma vs Tamron

via PhotoPlus – Issue 130 – Sept 2017

Nikon D7500 or D7200… or D500… or D750?

Nikon’s new enthusiast all-rounder attempts to combine features, performance, image quality and value.

The Nikon D7500 does not boast any dramatic new technologies but it does fill a significant gap in Nikon’s DSLR range. Before, enthusiasts had to choose between the powerful but relatively pedestrian D7200 and the much more advanced – and much more expensive – D500. Nikon’s latest addition to its DX line-up is designed to offer a balance between high-end performance and features, and price.

The D7200 is cheaper and has 24 megapixels. why don’t I just buy that?

Yes, the D7200’s strengths are its range of features, outright image quality, solid construction and great handling. But it’s not a sports or low-light specialist. Its continuous shooting speed isn’t bad at 6fps, but its 26-shot Raw buffer capacity falls way short of the D7500’s 50 shots, and its AF system lacks Group Area AF mode. The D7200’s older sensor delivers plenty of resolution, but more noise with it, so by the time you reach medium to high-ISO settings, the difference in image quality between these two cameras will become apparent. It doesn’t have the D7500’s tilting screen or touch-screen control, either. And for video, the 4K D7500 is a clear winner.

The bottom line:The D7200 is a terrific all-round camera, but just remember it’s not built for speed or low light.

Will I regret not going the extra mile and buying the D500?

You might, but you need to be clear what the extra cash is getting you – another 2fps continuous shooting speed, an even larger memory buffer and Nikon’s latest high-tech 153-point autofocus system. The D500 is also built like a tank and uses Nikon’s professional control layout, and is slightly more responsive. The D500 has twin memory cards slots (1 SD, 1 XQD) whereas the D7500 only has one, and although its LCD is the same size, it has more than twice the resolution. You’re paying a lot more money and you’re getting a lot more camera, but the D500’s advantages are all geared to the rough and tumble of a serious action photographer’s lifestyle.

The bottom line:The D500 is worth the extra only for sports fans and pros looking for a second, speedy DX-format body.

At this price, why don’t I just take the plunge and go for the full frame D750?

Absolutely! But this is where you need some crystal-clear thinking about where you want to go with your photography. If you’re looking for an all-round improvement in image quality, like exploring a mixture of subjects and are keen to progress as an artist or as a professional, the D750 is indeed the better choice. A DX-format camera like the D7500 is restricted partly by its sensor size, but also by lens choice; for the best choice of primes and constant-aperture zooms at both standard and shorter focal lengths, Nikon’s FX format is the way to go. But if your interest lies in sports/action/low-light photography, the D7500 delivers more bang for your buck.

The bottom line:If you can afford to buy the D7500, maybe you can afford to go full frame with the D750.

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More in N Photo – Summer 2017
by Rod Lawton

Digital Camera World

NIKKOR Lens Simulator

You can simulate images shot with various combinations of lenses, ranging from wide-angle to telephoto, and cameras, in different formats. Image varies with the value of the focal length.
Select any combination you are interested in.

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NIKKOR Lens Simulator
try it at Nikon

Test our lenses | Fujifilm X Mount Lenses

Test our range of lenses and see how different lenses and aperture values affect the image.
1. Choose a lens
2. Choose aperture value (and zoom if available)
3. Click the “Take Photo” button
To view and compare your images, click the “View Lightbox” button.

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Test our lenses | Fujifilm X Mount Lenses
try it at Fujifilm X Mount

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