L’Urbex par Romain Veillon

Romain Veillon (1983-) est un photographe français spécialisé dans la visite de lieux abandonnés : l’urbex. Il capte l’ambiance surannée d’espaces urbains en décrépitude, où la nature reprend peu à peu place. Romain Veillon fait ses gammes en autodidacte, il commence par photographier différents endroits délaissés autour de la petite ceinture parisienne. Cette passion se prolonge dans ses voyages à travers le monde. Par ses photographies Romain Veillon établit un dialogue entre passé, présent et futur. Certains espaces ont poursuivis leur délabrement, d’autres ont été détruits, vandalisés ou restaurés. La photo devient le témoin d’une époque, le relevé optique d’un bâtiment à un moment T. Dans ces instantanés parfois post-apocalyptiques, le spectateur peut projeter une histoire fantasmée.

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L’Urbex par Romain Veillon
via gadcollection

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Inside Abandoned Buildings

For this contest I would like to see your photographs of the inside of abandoned buildings which you have explored but have been forgotten. Please only show the inside of buildings that have been abandoned, not maintained ruins. The dirtier, creepier, and more forgotten, the better. Also, please make sure your photographs are taken inside the building.

Waiting for the builders
by Neil Gosling
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“Dodgem Car”
by Patrick Reilly
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Ruined chateau
by Forgotten Heritage
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Days Gone By
by Jacquie Matechuk
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Beelitz
by wunderbilder
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Inside Abandoned Buildings
more at Photocrowd

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“I Capture My Girlfriend In Thrilling Abandoned Locations Across Europe”

We are Jade Stacy Maria & James Kerwin, an adventurous couple who met in early 2015.
Firstly, I am James, a keen photographer who for the last 9 years is known for the interior and abandoned architecture fine art photography work, however, I have occasionally dabbled in taking portraits of Jade and others to practice the art of lighting and to assist Jade in the up-keep of her portfolio as a fashion and beauty model.
Since 2014, Jade has taken modeling seriously, attempting to branch out and work with both amateur and professional photographers across the United Kingdom, starting from her base in the East of England.

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I Capture My Girlfriend In Thrilling Abandoned Locations Across Europe
more by​ James Kerwin
at Bored Panda

Abandoned

What does an award-winning photograph look like? It can range from an captivating portrait of a family member to a moon-drenched landscape to movement captured at just the right time. Our 16th Annual Photo Contest is now open for submissions, and we’re looking for the best of the best.

Abandoned Beauty
by Daniele Giddens
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Abandoned pick up truck watching traffic
by C M Burt
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America’s First Subway
by Justin Hamel
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Lost dreams on the Gulf Coast. A shrimp boat from Hurricane Katrina still stands tall even though it’s been left behind.
by Todd Lambert
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Crystal Mill
by Erik Johnson
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more from the 16th Annual Photo Contest at Smithsonian

Photographers Beautify Abandoned Places & Things

Thank you to all the photographers that shared their favorite shots of abandoned places or things in this photo contest.

“Mediterranean Sky shipwreck” by panospapa
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“Cabin (bw) ” by Structor
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“Piano keys upclose ” by talyaculbertson
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“Davenportals 19” by kenfong_7038
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“House of the rising Sun” by aaronjgroen
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from ” 15+ Photographers Beautify Abandoned Places & Things “
more at viewbug

Infrared Chernobyl by Vladimir Migutin

Infrared filters are known for creating a weird, eerie mood in pictures, no matter what you’re capturing. That is why taking a filter like that to an already haunting-looking place like Chernobyl might make the scenery pictures you take look even more impressive. Photographer Vladimir Migutin did just that on his trip to the town in Ukraine that suffered the infamous nuclear disaster.

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from: Chernobyl Shot With Infrared Photography Looks More Haunting Than Ever (Interview)
by​ Iveta

continue at Bored Panda

Urban Exploring | The Smartphone Way

Somewhere near you, a building lies empty. There are no footsteps to be heard in the hallways. The abandoned possessions of previous occupants litter the floor like leaves on the street. Perhaps there’s some old machinery, or a grand stage that’s no longer the center of attention. All the light is natural, and the elements are slowly breaking down the shell around you.

Photo by David Capponi
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Photo by Christian Feichtner
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Photo by David Capponi
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Photo by Christian Feichtner
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Urban Exploring
The Smartphone Way

by Mark Myerson in Mobiography