Still lifes with animals

Winning images from the “Still lifes with animals” competition

Elizabeth E
Маркиз – Фотограф
USA, LA. North Louisiana
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Alexander Sviridov
3 Kittens
Canada, Maple
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Полякова Татьяна
Кот с молоком
Russia, Москва
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Marasa
Любопытный нос
Belarus, Минск
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Сушкевич Светлана
Я тоже хочу сниматься!
Russia, Домодедово
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Still lifes with animals

more at 35photo

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Fifty Years of Fujifilm Mirrorless Medium Format Cameras

Yep, 51 actually. Back in the 1960s, unlike all its rivals in the medium format camera market at the time, Fujifilm decided to concentrate on rangefinder designs rather than reflexes. And, of course, rangefinder cameras are mirrorless, right?

As has been the philosophy behind the GFX 50S and now the 50R, Fujifilm’s key objective back then was to combine “carrying ease” with “handling speed” hence the decision to package the 6x9cm format in a 35mm-style rangefinder body.

The Fujica G690 was launched in March 1968 at the Tokyo Camera Show and went on sale in the December of that year. It was compact for a 6x9cm format camera and had interchangeable lenses. An internal mask covered the film gate when lenses were being changed. It had a coupled rangefinder and the viewfinder also incorporated frame lines which not only adjusted for parallax as the lens was focused, but also the field-of-view. Even Leica didn’t offer this facility on its contemporary 35mm RF cameras. An updated version, the GL690 Professional, was launched in 1974 along with a 6x7cm camera called the GM670 Professional.

However, in 1978, Fujifilm decided to adopt a fixed-lens configuration which, along with a switch to GRP bodyshells, resulted in significant weight savings. The original GW690 and GW670 both had a 90mm f3.5 lens which was equivalent – in 35mm format terms – in focal length to a 35mm on the 6x9cm format and a 42mm on the 6x7cm. These models subsequently evolved through Series II (1985) and III (1992) versions and an ultrawide GSW version of the 6x9cm model was introduced in 1980. It had a 65mm f5.6 lens which was equivalent to a 25mm.

A line of 6×4.5cm format RF cameras was introduced in 1983 to enable even more compact and lightweight designs. While the early models were fully manual (but with built-in metering), in 1995, Fujifilm launched the next-generation GA645 Professional which caused almost as big a stir as the original X100 digital camera did in 2010. It pretty much went ‘all the way’ with automation – autofocus, program exposure control, motorised film transport and a built-in, pop-up flash – with styling similar to the 35mm compacts of the time. It was a medium format point-and shoot camera. The GA645 had a 60mm f4.0 lens, but a wider-angle version, called the GA645W (and also launched in 1995), was fitted with a 45mm f4.0 lens. Both were subsequently upgraded in 1997, and rebadged as the GA645i and GA645Wi respectively, with the main change being the addition of a second shutter release button on the front panel. In 1998, Fujifilm introduced the last-of-theline GA645Zi model which had a 55-90mm f4.5-6.9 zoom lens (equivalent to 35-55mm) and a modernised body with a more pronounced handgrip.

Given this track record, don’t rule out a digital medium format X100-style camera (i.e. with a fixed lens) from Fujifilm sometime in the future.
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report by Paul Burrows
in Australian Camera

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Good Cameras Can Take Bad Photos

“I would love to be a better photographer… if only I had a better camera.” This is a comment I hear every day in my gallery. What many people don’t understand is that the type of camera you use is not the key to improving your photography. — Andrew Goodall

“Day Sixty Eight” captured by Dustin Diaz

The truth is, you can take better photos no matter what sort of camera you have. Digital cameras have become so advanced that almost all cameras now have aperture and shutter speed settings, not to mention amazingly powerful optical zoom lenses. These are features that, until very recently, were only available on DSLR cameras. So if you want to take better photos, the features are right there in front of you. All you have to do is take the time to learn how to use them.

“PhotoWalk” captured by Vincent Miao

To take better photos, start with the manual that came with your camera. It will tell you how to operate the major settings, although it may not be so good at explaining what they are for. Then find the information you need to understand how those settings will help you take better photos. There are courses, workshops, books and e-books that will tell you what you need to know.

Photo by Joao Santos; ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/400-second exposure.

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Good Cameras Can Take Bad Photos
by Andrew Goodall
more at Picture Correct

Perfect for a fashionista – The Louis Vuitton edition Nikon Z7 camera

Collaborations have always been in vogue. Be it cars, real estate, mobile phones, and even digital cameras, fashion brands are always keen to lend their name and styling expertise to companies. Hermes has been collaborating with Leica for a while now, so why not others?

How about Louis Vuitton partnering with Nikon? While there is no official word yet a photo has propped up on the Nikon Rumours website that shows the Z7 dressed up in Louis Vuitton. The top of the camera looks to be in covered in real gold and the rest of it covered it in the LV insignia. Could this be Nikon taking the high road to luxury or it is just the imagination of a photoshopper? We will know soon. Whatever it may be, it does look good.

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Perfect for a fashionista – The Louis Vuitton edition Nikon Z7 camera
via Luxury Launches

Passion Pursued — An Interview With Camera Maker Dora Goodman

Ever since we saw the camera work of Dora Goodman a few months back, we’ve been meaning to get her on the Magazine for an interview. Now that we did, we can’t help but grin as we look at her work and read what she has to say. Dora is the perfect example for the saying “Follow your heart.” She left her career in 3d animated graphics to take up camera making and boy are we glad that she did. All of her cameras are carefully built, purposely designed, and beautiful in form. Learn more about her and her work in this short interview and who knows, you might just get bitten by the camera craft bug.
Disclaimer: Lomography Magazine will not be responsible for the major GAS (gear acquisition syndrome) that you are about to experience.

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Passion Pursued — An Interview With Camera Maker Dora Goodman
more by cheeo at Lomography

Goodman One – The Open Source Camera

The Goodman One is an open source camera that I would like to share with anyone with access to a 3D printer. You’d not only have a chance to make it yourself using my assembly instructions, but to further tweak, finetune or even redesign and pass it on as well. I have already designed a rollfilm and sheetfilm back, viewfinders, cold flash mount and a couple of other accessories to attach, but would like to challenge all of you makers out there to go ahead and develop the camera even further.

The Goodman One could therefore be a device that is free yet professional tool allowing creative freedom for any experimental photographer. You can request various files, finetuned printer settings and a detailed notes on both the necessary particles and procedure needed to put the camera together. I truly hope it will reach as many of you out there as humanly possible and will open up new opportunities in the path of photography.

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Goodman One – The Open Source Camera
more at Dora Goodman