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Filter holders | Testbench Round-Up

If you’re serious about landscape photography, you’ll need some drop-in flters. James Abbott looks at some of the best flter holder options available.

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Filter holders | Testbench Round-Up
via Amateur Photographer Magazine

Wide-Angle Zooms

Play the angles and get the big picture with an ultra-wide zoom lens.
With zoom ranges starting at just 8mm for APS-C format lenses, and 11mm for full-frame, you can shoehorn vast areas into the image frame. They’re great for shooting sweeping landscapes or architecture, and arguably even more useful when shooting indoors, where space is limited – but that’s just the start of the fun.

A key attraction of ultra-wide lenses is that you can create images with extraordinary perspective effects. Get in close to the main subject in a scene and you can massively exaggerate its relative size, against a shrunken, receding background. Parallel lines appear to converge at alarming rates and shots generally have a proper wow factor. Another bonus is that short focal lengths equate to huge depths of feld. Unlike portraiture, where it’s often favourable to blur the background, wide-angle lenses enable you to keep very close subjects and the distant horizon simultaneously sharp.

Barrel distortion can also add to the creative effect, especially when using wide-angle zooms at or near their shortest focal length. That said, all of the lenses in this test group are ‘rectilinear’, aiming to keep distortions to a minimum. The alternative is a fsheye or ‘curvilinear’ lens, which give even greater viewing angles but with more barrel distortion.

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Wide-Angle Zooms
Matthew Richards fnds the best buys to fit your Canon DLSR.

via Photo Plus – The Canon Magazine

Super-Telephoto Zooms: Canon vs Fujifilm vs Nikon vs Pentax vs Sigma vs Sony vs Tamron

Whether you’re shooting sports, wildlife or something else altogether, sometimes a standard telephoto zoom lens just can’t get you close enough to the action. A supertelephoto zoom lens will extend your reach signifcantly – and there are plenty to choose from.

A zoom range of around 100-400mm has long been a popular option to include in lens ranges (there are four included here), but some manufacturers have been pushing the envelope, super-sizing focal lengths to as much as 600mm.

Apart from the Fujiflm X-mount lens, all of the contenders in this group are fully compatible with both full-frame and cropsensor cameras. Naturally if you fit them to an APS-C format camera, you can extend your effective reach even further, with a 1.5x multiplication effect (1.6x for Canon cameras). Typical attractions include fast autofocus systems and optical image stabilisation, but there can be notable differences in features and performance. Let’s take a look at what’s on offer…

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Matthew Richards tests the leading lenses for bumping up your telephoto reach
The Contenders
1. Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM
2. Fujiflm 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR
3. Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR
4. Pentax 150-450mm f/4.5-5.6 ED DC AW HD
5. Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C
6. Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S
7. Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 OSS G Master
8. Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2

via Digital Camera World

Nikon AF-P DX 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Review

Now you can get a Nikon-branded super-wide zoom for the same price as a third-party lens.
On paper, the Nikon AF-P DX 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR has a few things stacked against it, but as soon as you use it, its small size, light weight and simplicity are instantly appealing. Serious enthusiasts might not be impressed, but its a brilliant buy for newer D3000- and D5000-series users.

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Will it work with your camera?
Here’s the official word on camera compatibility from Nikon:
Fully compatible models: D500, D7500, D5600, D5500, D5300*, D3400, D3300* and later models
Compatible models with limited functions: D5, D810, Df, D750, D7200, D7100, D5200, Nikon 1 series with the FT1 mount adapter.
Incompatible models D4 series, D3 series, D2 series, D1 series, D800 series, D700, D610, D600, D300 series, D200, D100, D7000, D5100, D5000, D90, D80, D70 series, D3200, D3100, D3000, D60, D50, D40 series, film cameras
*Firmware update may be required
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via N-Photo
Issue 76 – September 2017

Super-Tele Zooms

Super-size your telephoto reach with a monster zoom lens. Matthew Richards searches out the best buys for your Canon camera.

Sometimes a standard telephoto lens can simply come up short. A typical 70-300mm zoom can lack sufficient telescopic reach when you’re shooting anything from birds in the garden to animals in the wild, or from sporting events to air shows. For greater reach, you’ll need a longer lens with more pulling power.

Over the next few pages, we’ll compare all of the latest super-telephoto zoom lenses currently manufactured to fit Canon DSLRs. Sizes go from large to enormous, and there’s an even broader spread of prices. However, all of them stretch to a focal length of at least 400mm, and some go extra-long to as much as 600mm. They’re also all fully compatible with both full-frame and APS-C format camera bodies. The latter gives a 1.6x crop factor, further boosting the effective telephoto reach.

A perennial problem, when shooting at such long focal lengths, is camera-shake. It’s therefore no surprise that every current super-telephoto zoom lens on the market for Canon cameras has optical image stabilization built in. They also feature fast and whisper-quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus systems. Even so, when it comes to additional features and build quality, there are major differences between some of the lenses on test. Let’s take a closer look…

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Super-Tele Zooms by Matthew Richards

Canon vs Sigma vs Tamron

via PhotoPlus – Issue 130 – Sept 2017

77 Reasons to Upgrade…

If you have an older EOS camera, find out how far Canon DSLR technology has moved on…

Canon EOS 77D
Canon’s new enthusiast DSLR offers the technology of the EOS 80D in a smaller, cheaper body. Phil Hall gives it a test

77 reasons why Canon’s new camera is better than yours!

more in PhotoPlus
The Canon Magazine
Issue 128 – July 2017