Above Stockholm

Usually shooting aerial imagery with his feet planted on the ground, Tobias Hägg (Airpixels) traded in his drone for a helicopter ride over Stockholm to get a change of perspective. Capturing the cityscape of the Swedish capital during golden hour with the X1D II 50C without testing it out much beforehand, Tobias aimed to see just what the medium format camera could do in the air. Shooting on both the XCD 30 and XCD 90 lenses, Tobias’ imagery takes us on a journey from above, between Swedish homes and golden-topped trees neatly woven together in combination with wide expanses of the city stretching all the way to the horizon.

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Above Stockholm
by Tobias Hägg

more at hasselblad

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Vietnam from above

A bird’s-eye view highlights the diverse landscapes of this Southeast Asian country.
Vietnam stretches over a thousand miles from north to south and measures only 31 miles wide at the narrowest point. Long and skinny, this J-shaped Southeast Asian country holds three distinct climate zones to lure travelers. Tea plantations stripe the mountains of the northern provinces near the border with China, beaches edge the South China Sea to the east, and in the south, the Mekong Delta creates a maze of rivers, swamps, and islands, dotted by floating markets and rice paddies just waiting to be explored.

Green tea islands dot an irrigation lake near Vietnam’s border with Laos.
Photograph by Trung Pham
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In Hanoi, a woman dries incense for people to pay respect to their ancestors.
Photograph by Thạch Phạm Ngọc
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During holidays, flowers float across the Perfume River in the central Vietnamese city of Hue.
Photograph by Ngo Dung
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Three women share a moped through the streets of Ho Chi Minh City.
Photograph by khai nguyen tuan
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Buildings and roads resemble an electronic circuit board in Ho Chi Minh City, populated by nine million people.
Photograph by Trung Pham
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See Vietnam’s diverse landscapes and staggering natural beauty through aerial photos captured by our photography community.

more at National Geographic

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Outdoor Photographer of the Year 2017

Outdoor Photographer Of The Year Competition Category Winners Revealed

View from Above
Tom Sweetman (United Kingdom)
Chiang Mai, Thailand
It was just before sunset in Chiang Mai and I decided to ride my scooter alongside the famous Ping River. As I was approaching a bridge I stopped to take a break and noticed that it was a motorbike bridge for locals, connecting two villages. I took this aerial photograph with my drone to document the incredible patterns in the river and the locals crossing the bridge on their scooters. Some days you just capture the moment.
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Light on the Land
Simon Baxter
North Yorkshire, England (United Kingdom)
I originally captured a similar scene to this during a flurry of unexpected snow in April 2016. It’s typically the first spot I come to when exploring this private woodland, and I couldn’t help but capture it again when I was treated to these wonderful – but rare – conditions of mist with a hint of warm light as the morning sun tried to break through. The combination of the damp cobwebs, fallen birch, dominant old pine and the soft light filling this atmospheric and shallow valley makes it a favourite spot of mine for solitude.
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Wildlife Insight
Jose Fragozo (Portugal)
Nairobi National Park, Kenya
This image shows two giraffes and three impalas in the rain in the forest region of Nairobi National Park, Kenya, which is also home to the Athi lion pride. I have observed these lions hunting many times in the rain, which possibly explains why different species of preyed animals stay together; it’s a defence mechanism, so they can collectively sense predators better. In this case, however, the lions were far away. The photo was taken from inside a 4×4 vehicle, and the major challenge was keeping the camera and lens dry.
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Spirit of Travel
Andy Holliman (United Kingdom)
Kangerlussuaq airport, Greenland.
Kangerlussuaq airport is the largest airport in Greenland, so it is not only a busy hub for domestic flights, but also the main arrival point for international travellers. Air Greenland has a near monopoly on flights, so almost everything is in the company’s bright red colours. It was the simple colour palette of this scene that appealed to me, including the signposts that are apparently directing the planes to their destinations. My departure had been delayed by three days due to bad weather on the coast, so seeing the arrival of the plane that would return me to Copenhagen was welcome. It may not look that way, but the end of winter was near and within weeks the snow would have cleared.
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Under Exposed
Saeed Rashid (United Kingdom)
Sohal surgeonfish, Fury Shoals, Red Sea, Egypt
In the summer months, sohal surgeonfish tend to mate and lay eggs on the top of the reefs in the Red Sea. They fiercely defend their egg patch and rush upon anything that invades that area. They will often swipe their tail, which has a bony protrusion sticking from it that can be as sharp as a surgeon’s scalpel, towards the intruder. Because of this you need to make sure you don’t get too close as a photographer’s hands make a very easy target and often get cut.
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Outdoor Photographer Of The Year Competition Category Winners
more at opoty

Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin

Niaz Uddin is a photographer, director, and filmmaker that explores a variety of natural landscapes from high above. His color-saturated photographs explore crowded beaches and remote tide pools, capturing each of the scenic environments from a bird’s eye view.

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Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin
more by Kate Sierzputowski on Colossal

Earth From Above

Explore our awe-inspiring planet, continent by continent, through incredible images captured from the air by the likes of drones and satellites…

The pearls of Bahrain
Shaped like an ornate necklace, the Durrat Al-Bahrain islands are an artificial archipelago, whose name translates as ‘the most perfect pearl’. To create the 20km2 of new land off the south-east coast of Bahrain, 34 million cubic metres of material was dredged from the seafloor of the Persian Gulf. The islands are like mini towns with luxury homes, shopping malls and schools.
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The land of extremes
The rich red-orange sand dunes of the Namib Desert stretch inland towards the Naukluft Mountains. Most moisture from the Atlantic falls as rain near the coast, yet some rolls across the arid desert as fog, quenching wildlife and oxidising the iron in the sand dunes to create their red colour. Highland water flows down the Kuiseb River greening the land to the north. In the south, as the Tsondab River hits the desert, water evaporates, leaving behind white salt and mineral deposits.
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The great desert
This shot of part of t he Sahara in Western Libya was captured by EarthKAM – a NASA programme where students from all over the world can ask for images to be taken from the International Space Station of specific locations on Earth. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, with northeasterly winds that can reach hurricane levels, and as little as 2.5cm of rain on average each year.
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Island birth
The world’s youngest island, Nishinoshima, is made up of two sections which formed over 60 years apart. The lower section was created in 1973 when an underwater volcano erupted, while the upper part first broke through the ocean’s surface in November 2013, merging with its neighbour soon after. Every day, the island produces 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of lava.
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At the heart of green energy
Over 4,000 mirrors direct sunlight to a boiler in a central tower at the Khi Solar One power plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. At full capacity the boiler heats up to a toasty 530ºC. The plant began commercial operation in February 2016, and supplies energy to around 45,000 homes.
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more in:
Earth from Above
Our planet as you’ve never seen it before

Part of the BBC Focus Magazine Collection

Capturing the world around us from above

Dronescapes
Dronescapes explores the brand new world of drone photographers using distance to offer a new perspective on the world around us.

Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur, USA By Romeo Durscher
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Lake Guerlédan, France By Nicolas Charles
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Miami, USA By iMaerial_com
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Rio de Janeiro, Brazil By Alexandre Salem
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Saint-Malo, France By Easy Ride
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Today Dronestagram is the world’s leading drone photography website, boasting a community of over 10,000 members that continues to grow and rediscover the world around them. Although not often talked about, the abilities of quadcopters go far beyond beautiful landscapes and surveillance – drone photographers explore textures, light and shadow, the interaction between wildlife and technology, as well as the art of perspective and dilapidated buildings.

more at huck magazine

Stuart Chape | Aerial Photography

Stuart Chape
I am an environmental and social photographer, undertaking a range of assigments but specialising in aerial photography, which I have been doing for more than 30 years.
As a number of photographers have discovered, the view from above can capture a unique perspective.

My own objective is to capture the reality of aerial views in a way that not only reveals patterns and designs but also the relationship of humans to nature and the built environment, as well as the beauty of nature – and environmental issues – seen from above.

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Stuart Chape Photography
43mm Issue 10

via issuu