Black and White Images of the Metropolis

The captivating street photography of London-based Alan Schaller incorporate a stunning combination of geometry, high contrast and surrealism, as well as a human aspect to each image. His series Metropolis examines how we are often lost in the world around us. Schaller uses scale to show the contrast between his subjects and the sprawling architectural backgrounds they stand against. With a masterful technique of light and shadow, each image is heavy with emotion.

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Black and White Images of the Metropolis by Alan Schaller
more at fubiz

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Black and White City Architecture | Wolfgang Mothes

Black and White City Architecture

“Medienhafen”
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“Posttower / Tower 185 I”
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“Kranhaus II / Tower 185 III”
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“Tower 185 II”
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Wolfgang Mothes Photography
via Camerapixo

Black and White Photography by Nikolai Endegor

Black and White Photography by Nikolai Endegor

Переход
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Котометрия
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Нижний мир
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Ночные красавицы
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Balcony Dance
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Вкус Парижа
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Black and White Photography by Nikolai Endegor
more at 35photo

城市里的我 – Humans in the chaotic city

Shanghai based photographer Linda R Yao explores the youthful soul and raw beauty with her pictures and documents the beautiful things that are often overlooked. In doing so the images never look eccentric or deliberately provocative but rather sensual and thought-provoking.

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城市里的我 – Humans in the chaotic city
by photographer Linda R Yao

more at C-Heads

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography

Do you have a fascination with infrared photography but no idea about its ins and outs? With decades of experience, Tim Shoebridge will guide you through the process of creating infrared masterpieces.

I have always had a fascination with infrared photography for as long as I can remember. I started out with my first film camera when I was only just a teenager, I was drawn to photography like a magnet at a very young age and in the years that followed I was fortunate to be able to experiment with film processing and printing in a make-shift darkroom at home. I progressed from a make-shift darkroom to something permanent, from regular black & white to infrared, lithographic and then both colour negative (C41) and colour positive (E6) processes. Upon turning sixteen I went to work in the darkroom of a busy wedding photography business. That was all thirty-five years ago.

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography
continue at Landscape Photography Magazine