Secrets to the Nikon AF System

This is over 450 pages of everything I know about the Nikon AF system. It’s far more than just a supplement to the instruction manual, this is a guide that will teach you, step by step, how to really use the system! Each page will instill advice and confidence so you’ll feel completely comfortable each time you adjust your AF settings in the field.

We’ll examine everything from the basics of autofocus to how the AF system actually works inside the camera. We’ll look at all the different AF area modes (like Dynamic, Group, 3D, etc), I’ll show you new ways to focus that you may never have been exposed to before, we’ll discuss how the Live View AF system works, we’ll go over every custom setting for autofocus – what to use and why, we’ll look at all the AF controls on your lenses, we’ll cover AF fine tuning, killer focusing tips and techniques, and the top ten reasons you aren’t getting sharp images! WHEW!

“The book has been a pleasure to write and although you and I may never have crossed paths, it was a privilege sharing this with you. I hope we can meet out there in the field one day.
Until then, wishing you the best!”
~Steve Perry
— – —

Secrets to the Nikon AF System
via SoftArchive

— – —

How to Check & Correct Your Autofocus: Tips for Fine-Tuning AF to Get Sharper Images

It’s time to sharpen up your pix. Modern DSLRs generally rely on what’s called phase difference autofocusing: basically, a rangefinder scheme updated with new technology. But as I described in the May 2018 issue of Shutterbug, this technology uses a second optical path within the camera, independent of the lens-to-sensor path used to make the photo.

Well, when there are two of anything, they’ll never be identical—excepting protons, electrons, and other elementary particles! Given manufacturing tolerances and the routine punishment you visit on your camera, it’s possible that these two paths are slightly different. Sure, your autofocus oughta focus. But it could be off.

Manufacturers are aware of this problem and often give you a way to “tune” or “microadjust” the autofocus. The adjustment is generally buried among endless camera menus, but a quick web search will tell you if your equipment has this capability.

Click on the image to view a full resolution version of the autofocus test target. Then right click to download it.

— – —

How to Check & Correct Your Autofocus: Tips for Fine-Tuning AF to Get Sharper Images
by Seth Shostak

more at Shutterbug

— – —

In Focus: Camera Basics

Confused over what terms such as “shutter speed”, “aperture”, “ISO speed”,”exposure compensation”,”white balance” mean? Have no fear – our Camera Basics series take you through each of these important fundamental concepts of photography, so that you won’t only get to know your camera better, but also have a better idea of how you can tweak camera modes and settings to get amazing shots!

Camera Basics #1: Aperture
The first thing to consider when taking photographs with a digital camera is the effect that the aperture can have on your pictures. How will the photograph finish change depending on the aperture is widened or narrowed? In this article, we study the effects of varying apertures on depth-of-field by comparing several examples, and learn about the concept of f-stops.
— – —

Camera Basics #2: Shutter Speed
When taking photographs, you want to have a good grasp of shutter speed and its effects on your photographs. What kind of effects can you create with a faster or slower shutter speed? Let us examine the effects of different shutter speeds with the help of the following examples.
— – —

Camera Basics #3: Exposure
Exposure is one of the major factors that can make or break a picture. Let us talk about how we can go about make best use of exposure to get the best results from a shot.
— – —

Camera Basics #4: Exposure Compensation
Exposure compensation is a function you can use to change the exposure set by the camera (camera-determined correct exposure) into something of your own preference. Here, we find out more about the function, and learn how to identify subjects that require positive or negative exposure compensation along the way.
— – —

Camera Basics #5: ISO Speed
ISO speed plays an equally important role as aperture and shutter speed in its effect on exposure. Now let us learn more about the advantages and disadvantages of turning up the ISO speed.
— – —

Camera Basics #6: White Balance
White balance is a feature that ensures that the colour white is reproduced accurately regardless of the type of lighting under which a photo is taken. At a very basic level, it is common to use the Auto White Balance setting. However, this setting is no one-size-fits-all solution. For a white balance setting that best suits the lighting source, choose one of the preset white balance settings on your camera.
— – —

Camera Basics #7: Metering
The metering function measures the brightness of a subject and decides how much exposure is best for the photo. Let’s take a look at each metering mode available, and get a better idea of which of them to use is best to use under which conditions/scene.
— – —

Camera Basics #8: Establishing Focus
The one thing that enables the photographer to convey his photographic intent to the viewer is establishing the focus. What are the secrets to establishing the best focus? Let’s find out more about the special features of autofocus (AF) and manual focus (MF).
— – —

Camera Basics #9: AF Modes
When establishing focus on a subject, it is vitally important to anticipate the subject’s movement and capture it at the right moment. This means it is essential to know the appropriate autofocus (AF) mode to use for a stationary subject, and which to use when the subject is moving. Let us take a closer look at the 3 types of AF modes.
— – —

Camera Basics #10: Picture Style
With the Picture Style function, you can adjust the colour tone and the contrast to enhance the charm and appeal of the subject. By selecting the perfect Picture Style setting, you can get perfect results in expressing your shooting intent in a vivid photo.
— – —

Camera Basics #11: Phase Detection AF
Phase detection AF (also known as phase-difference detection AF or phase-difference AF) is the autofocus system used in viewfinder shooting on DSLR cameras. Its main feature lies in its rapid autofocusing speed. In the following, we will explain more about phase detection AF, and how Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF utilizes the latest AF technology to enable phase detection AF even in Live View.
— – —

Camera Basics #12: The Viewfinder
When it comes to shooting, a vital part of the camera is the viewfinder. Nowadays, there are cameras that do not come with viewfinders, only with Live View shooting. However, as you get more experienced with photography, you will realise how much shooting with a viewfinder can affect your photos. In this article, we take a closer look at the viewfinder.
— – —

Camera Basics #13: Live View
The implementation of Dual Pixel CMOS AF in Canon’s latest camera models have vastly improved shooting conditions in Live View. Live View, which features fast AF speed that measures up to viewfinder AF, is gradually becoming the choice method of shooting for many photographers. In the following, we will explain more about the characteristics of Live View.
— – —

Camera Basics #14: Position and Angle
The position and angle are two elements that greatly influence the outcome of your photos. Since they have such a significant impact, varying them ensures that you will be able to get a different effect in your photos. In the following, we go over 3 points each in relation to the position and the angle.
— – —

Camera Basics # 15: Program AE
The Program AE mode, a semi-automatic mode where the camera automatically sets the aperture and shutter speed, enables you to shoot quickly to capture sudden photographic opportunities, and yet still retain creative control over other settings such as white balance.
— – —

Camera Basics #16: Aperture-priority AE (AV mode)
Want to create photographs with a lovely background blur (bokeh effect), or perhaps ensure that everything in the image remains in focus? The Aperture-priority AE mode is a convenient mode to use for achieving those effects. Let’s look at this mode in closer detail.
— – —

Camera Basics # 17: Shutter-priority AE (TV mode)
Shutter-priority AE mode is a shooting mode that is useful for when you want to ‘freeze’ subjects in action, or conversely, photograph moving subjects with motion blur. Read on to find out how you can use it!
— – —

Camera Basics # 18: Manual Exposure (M mode)
If you want control over both the aperture and the shutter speed, Manual exposure mode is the way to go. It might be quite a tough mode to conquer for a beginner, but also can be very convenient to achieve certain shooting intentions. In this final article in our Camera Basics series, we take a closer look at this mode and what it can be used for.
— – —

In Focus: Camera Basics
more details at SnapShot

Les défis de la mise au point et les différents modes AF des marques

Les défis de la mise au point
Depuis son apparition sur le Konica C35 AF en 1977, la mise au point automatique (ou AF pour Auto Focus) est devenue une fonctionnalité particulièrement affûtée.
Pourtant, malgré ses sophistications technologiques, elle se fait régulièrement pièger par des conditions de prise de vue non prévues par ses algorithmes.

RP290voir dossier complet dans Réponses Photo Nº290 – Mai 2016

— – —

Les différents modes AF des marques

RP290a RP290b RP290c RP290d RP290e RP290f RP290g

Speeding Up Your AutoFocus

How to set up advanced Canon EOS DSLR for every type of action photography.

When you need a camera that can keep pace with fast action, it’s time to consider stepping up to one of Canon’s high-end enthusiast and professional DSLRs. As you may know, these camera bodies have sophisticated autofocus (AF) systems and a greater density of AF points in the centre of the viewfinder, in addition to their faster continuous shooting speeds.

The more AF points a camera has, the more effectively it can track a moving subject across the frame using AI Servo AF. But the sensitivity and precision of the sensor at each AF point makes a big difference, too. Standard AF sensors detect focus in just one plane, either horizontally or vertically. As the name suggests, cross-type sensors can detect both horizontally and vertically, while dual cross-type sensors are even more precise as they detect diagonally as well.

The number of AF points that are available and their precision is determined by the lens attached to the camera – or more precisely, by its maximum effective aperture. For example, ‘fast’ lenses – those which have large maximum apertures of f/2.8 or greater, such as the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM or EF 85mm f/1.8 USM – open up the full potential of the 5D Mark III’s 61-point AF array. But a lens with a relatively narrow maximum aperture may allow autofocus with only 47 AF points or fewer.

via PhotoPlus – The Canon Magazine

CanonAF03a CanonAF03b CanonAF03c CanonAF03d CanonAF03e CanonAF03f