Infrarouge | Infrared | инфракрасной

Несколько лет назад я первый раз увидел инфракрасный снимок. И просто заболел инфракрасной болезнью.
Я практически перестал снимать в видимом диапазоне спектра, отдавая время изучению и опытам в фотосъемке в невидимой человеческим глазом реальности.
В данной подборке я хочу представить работы, которые появились благодаря специально сделанной камере и разным по спектру пропускания фильтрам.
Приятного просмотра!

Про лунный свет. Инфракрасная фотографи
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Полоска солнца. Инфракрасная фотограф
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Созерцать отражения. Инфракрасная фот
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Не спрятаться от зноя. Инфракрасная фо
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Sergey D. | Sixten ( Сергей )
more at 35photo

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Capture Mania Nature

Nature photography is one of the most popular genres – who hasn’t walked past amazing scenery and tried to take a snapshot with whatever device was handy. Human beings have always been fascinated by nature and its creations and tried to depict them in some way – from cave paintings to classical art and contemporary landscapes. Nature photographers though, are weird creatures – they are able to hike for hours in the rain, mud, snowstorm or blazing heat and then camp for a week or a month to get a single killer-shot. Of all types of photography – nature photography must be the most difficult one – being at the mercy of the elements of weeks on end, hiding in a damp small hut just to have that animal pass before your lens, or spending a fortune to be on location just when Aurora Borealis is out in the sky. It takes a lot of dedication to keep getting up at 3 a.m. and drive through that storm seven times to get the breathtaking sunrise you want. …

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Capture Mania Photography Magazine | November December 2017 | issue 7
more at Capture Mania

Bessarion Chakhvadze Portfolio

Bessarion Chakhvadze Portfolio

красное дерево
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пастуший домик
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Aurelia
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таинственная бабочка
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Девушка у фонтана
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Bessarion Chakhvadze Portfolio
more at 35photo

The American West by Troyce Hoffman

Our public lands are one of this countries greatest treasures; millions of acres of forests, rivers, deserts, and parks. The majority of this acreage lies in the American West where they have become deeply intertwined with the local population, they are our tie to the wildness of our past, they humble, and teach us to have respect for the natural world. Once again their fate is on rocky ground and to lose them would be to lose a large part of our national identity.

All images were taken on the public lands of the west with a toy Holga camera.

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The American West by Troyce Hoffman
more at behance

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography

Do you have a fascination with infrared photography but no idea about its ins and outs? With decades of experience, Tim Shoebridge will guide you through the process of creating infrared masterpieces.

I have always had a fascination with infrared photography for as long as I can remember. I started out with my first film camera when I was only just a teenager, I was drawn to photography like a magnet at a very young age and in the years that followed I was fortunate to be able to experiment with film processing and printing in a make-shift darkroom at home. I progressed from a make-shift darkroom to something permanent, from regular black & white to infrared, lithographic and then both colour negative (C41) and colour positive (E6) processes. Upon turning sixteen I went to work in the darkroom of a busy wedding photography business. That was all thirty-five years ago.

A Guide to Infrared Landscape Photography
continue at Landscape Photography Magazine

A Sea of Sands | The Namibian Sossusvlei

A landscape photographer’s dream land with its red and orange towering dunes and the ever-changing play of light and shadow upon them.
Photos by Andrea & Antonella Ferrari

Namibia’s Sossusvlei embodies some of the planet’s most spectacular landscapes, and its desert environment is a photographer’s paradise where dramatic colors, patterns and light reign supreme. It has seen to be believed – the chromatic shades of the gigantic dunes can change completely from one second to the next, in a dizzying and endless carousel of shifting colors and light-and-shadow patterns. In its strictest sense, Sossusvlei (sometimes written Sossus Vlei) is a salt and clay pan surrounded by high red dunes, located in the southern part of the Namib Desert, in the Namib-Naukluft National Park.

The name “Sossusvlei” is however often used in an extended meaning to refer to the surrounding area (including other neighbouring vleis such as Deadvlei and other high dunes), which is one of the major visitor attractions of Namibia. The name itself is of mixed origin and roughly means “dead-end marsh”. Vlei is the Afrikaans word for “marsh”, while sossus is Nama for “no return” or “dead end”. Sossusvlei owes this name to the fact that it is an endorheic drainage basin (i.e., a drainage basin without outflows) for the ephemeral Tsauchab River. The Sossusvlei area belongs to a wider region of southern Namib with homogeneous features (about 32.000 km²) extending between rivers Koichab and Kuiseb. This area is characterized by high sand dunes of vivid pink-to-orange color, an indication of a high concentration of iron in the sand and consequent oxidation processes.

The oldest dunes are those of a more intense reddish color. These dunes are among the highest in the world; many of them are above 200 metres, the highest being the one nicknamed Big Daddy, about 325 metres high; however, the highest dune in the Namib Desert area, Dune 7, is about 388 metres high. The highest and more stable dunes are partially covered with a relatively rich vegetation, which is mainly watered by a number of underground and ephemeral rivers that seasonally flood the pans, creating marshes that are locally known as vlei; when dry, these pans look almost white in color, due to the high concentration of salt. Another relevant source of water for Sossusvlei is the humidity brought by the daily morning fogs that enter the desert from the Atlantic Ocean.

Fauna in the Sossusvlei area is relatively rich, comprising several small animals that can survive with little water, including a number of arthropods, small reptiles and small mammalians such as rodents or jackals; bigger animals include antelopes (mainly oryxes and springboks) and ostriches. During the flood season, several migrant bird species appear along the marshes and rivers. Much of the Sossusvlei and Namib fauna is endemic and highly adapted to the specific features of the Namib. Most notably, fog beetles such as the Namib Desert Beetle have developed a technique for collecting water from early morning fogs through the bumps in their back.
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A Sea of Sands | The Namibian Sossusvlei
by Andrea & Antonella Ferrari

more at AnimaMundiMag