Terminus by Reuben Wu

I travelled to Peru in July 2018 with the intention of continuing my Lux Noctis project at Pastoruri, one of the few glaciers that still exist at the tropics in the Cordillera Blanca at an altitude of 17,000ft.
This glacier is receding at a shocking rate due to climate change and as a result there has been a huge drop in tourism and an impact on the local community.

Lux Noctis, my larger project, is about presenting familiar sights in a new and unfamiliar light, renewing your sense of seeing and the experience of discovery. However, with this series, I felt like this was an attempt to document and preserve the memory of a landscape in peril which may not exist in a decade.

At 17,000ft, it was a physical challenge to reach the glacier, compounded by the fact that I was shooting at night and under freezing conditions. For this expedition, I was accompanied by a production company (Courageous Studio) who were shooting a short film on my work for Great Big Story, sponsored by Coors Lite, and they assisted in all the research, scouting, and getting me out to the glacier safely.
Flying the drone at this altitude presented a number of problems. Firstly, the cold made me lose sensation in my fingers, so it was difficult to control the lighting at the same time as the camera. The cold also significantly shortened battery life, and limited my flight time. Being out in a remote wilderness meant that there was no way I could recharge my batteries, so there was only so much time I had to shoot.

I photographed the glacier with conflicting feelings. I wanted to show evidence of its alarming retreat, yet I was drawn to the epic scale of the ice which remained. In the end I leaned towards the latter, but each photograph represents a bleak reality, a fading memory of what once stood.
Reuben Wu
more at Behance

Advertisements

Royal Air Force Photographic Competition

Judging for the 2018 Royal Air Force Photographic Competition recently took place at the Royal Air Force Museum London. Over 1,000 photos and 25 videos were entered across the competition’s 13 categories, with the best 9 images being whittled down by 3 industry professional judges, before going head-to-head online to win the ‘Peoples’ Choice’ category.

Remembrance
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
— – —

RAF Centenary
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
— – —

Perfection
Sgt Paul Oldfield, RAF Cosford
— – —

Parallels
SAC Hannah Smoker, RAFAT RAF Scampton
— – —

Selfie
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
— – —

Smoke In The Sun
Mr Mark Thompson, The Amateur Military Category
— – —

Royal Air Force Photographic Competition
more at RAF

The city by night

The city by night is an atmospheric environment, making it ideal for photos. We want to see your most creative efforts, no matter the specific subject, provided they were captured in the city at night.

Cuidad de la Artes y las Ciencias Valencia by ita
— – —

Ghost Bus by Sandra Cockayne
— – —

Organised Chaos | Hong Kong by Lee Mumford
— – —

Rainy Paris by Marketa
— – —

Marina Bay, Singapore by Mathew Browne
— – —

The city by night
In association with Digital Photographer

more at Photocrowd

Olympus Global Open Photo Contest

Throughout our near 100-year history, Olympus has been recognized as a pioneer and innovator focused on contributing to society by making people’s lives healthier, safer and more fulfilling. In line with these contributions, the Olympus Global Open Photo Contest 2017-18 featured the following six categories.

Over 150,000 entries were received from around the world. Thanks to all who entered. Here are the photos our judges selected as winners and runners-up. Congratulations to the photographers of these fascinating photos!

Grand Prize
Not leave Me by Myo Thet
— – —

Connections to Cherish
Category First Prize by Alexandr
— – —

Stories
Category First Prize – salt by giancarlolepore
— – —

Power of Life
Category First Prize – Maternidad by Mick-Villa
— – —

Art
Category First Prize – The winds of Aegean Sea by almoustris
— – —

Olympus Global Open Photo Contest
more at Olympus

Be challenged, be inspired and to take your photography to the next level

The AIPP EPSON State Awards, be challenged, be inspired and to take your photography to the next level.

Jonathan Armstrong APP AAIPP – 2018 AIPP NSW Epson Signature Worthy Award
— – —

Paul McCall APP – 2018 AIPP South Australian Travel Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Ignacio Palacios APP M.Photog. – 2018 AIPP NSW Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Tania Malkin APP – 2018 AIPP Northern Territory Epson Signature Worthy Award
— – —

Chris Saunders APP – 2018 AIPP Western Australian Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Peter Carroll APP AAIPP – 2018 AIPP Northern Territory Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Ed Jones APP – 2018 AIPP Tasmanian Wedding Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Louise Sedgman APP – 2018 AIPP Victorian Pet/Animal Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

Charlotte Reeves APP – 2018 AIPP Queensland Pet/Animal Professional Photographer of the Year
— – —

The AIPP EPSON State Awards, be challenged, be inspired and to take your photography to the next level.
more at State Awards

Australia’s drought – the cancer eating away at farms

From ground level, Australia’s drought looks like a featureless, brown dustbowl, but from the air it transforms into an artistry of colour and texture as the land cracks under a blazing sun.

Circular dry plough tracks resemble the concentric circles in Aboriginal dot paintings that tell of an ancient mythology, starving cattle queuing for feed look like an abstract painting and their black shadows stretching across the land a surrealist image.

But for farmer Ash Whitney, there is no such beauty, just blood, sweat and tears as he struggles to feed his cattle, cutting the drying branches of Kurrajong trees – a last resort during the worst of droughts.

“I have been here all my life, and this drought is feeling like it will be around a while,” says a despairing Whitney, whose property near the town of Gunnedah is on the Liverpool Plains, a usually fertile area now withered having received the lowest average rainfall in nearly 30 years.

— – —

Australia’s drought – the cancer eating away at farms
More from David Gray
at Wider Image