Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

With a little more than a month to go, the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest is in full swing. Photographers have until November 17, 2017 to enter their best photographs valuing the beauty of the natural world.

Photo by Jay Ruan
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Photo by Marc Hornig
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Photo by Alexis Darden
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Photo by Phillip Chang
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Photo by Shane Kalyn
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Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
more by Jessica Stewart at My Modern Met

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Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin

Niaz Uddin is a photographer, director, and filmmaker that explores a variety of natural landscapes from high above. His color-saturated photographs explore crowded beaches and remote tide pools, capturing each of the scenic environments from a bird’s eye view.

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Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin
more by Kate Sierzputowski on Colossal

Top Shots of All Time!

The BIG Collection
“More than 10,000 images were published during the last 3 years. So many great photographers, and choosing from so many images, It’s almost an impossible mission. But, after all those hours, I decided to exhibit the most impressive, giving inspiration and the images I find as the most powerful. The collection is a combination of most known international photographers along side with emerging photographers that for my opinion is most impressive! “
-Dafna Navarro, Founder, Editor in Chief, Lens Magazine

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Top Shots of All Time!
more in Lens Magazine – Issue 36

Даниил Коржонов | Daniel Korzhonov

Привет, дорогой посетитель моего сайта! Я рад, что ты оказался здесь на мгновение: на этом сайте – галереи моих работ, статьи и анонсы фотопутешествий. Наверное, вам интересно, кто я такой, какую технику использую и чем я живу? Тогда дам пару ответов.
Я использую фототехнику фирмы Никон: Nikon D800, Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8, Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8, Nikkor 14 f/2.8, Nikkor 50 mm f/2.8. Штативы Benro Travel Angel, Gitzo.

Алые паруса
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Катамаран
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Корни
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The Arch
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Даниил Коржонов | Daniel Korzhonov
more at 35photo

Work every angle

Dutch-Ecuadorian photographer Cris Toala Olivares is one of the new breed of young photographers carving out an eclectic career. He is fascinated by natural phenomena and engineered natural wonders, which he documents from helicopters and with drones as well as from the ground. His comprehensive work on volcanic eruptions, the Wadden Sea and Amsterdam’s canal belt speak to the beauty of working every angle. But as Cris explains to CPN Web Editor Deniz Dirim, to reach new heights you need to be business-savvy first…

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Work every angle
Cris Toala Olivares

more at Canon

Earth From Above

Explore our awe-inspiring planet, continent by continent, through incredible images captured from the air by the likes of drones and satellites…

The pearls of Bahrain
Shaped like an ornate necklace, the Durrat Al-Bahrain islands are an artificial archipelago, whose name translates as ‘the most perfect pearl’. To create the 20km2 of new land off the south-east coast of Bahrain, 34 million cubic metres of material was dredged from the seafloor of the Persian Gulf. The islands are like mini towns with luxury homes, shopping malls and schools.
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The land of extremes
The rich red-orange sand dunes of the Namib Desert stretch inland towards the Naukluft Mountains. Most moisture from the Atlantic falls as rain near the coast, yet some rolls across the arid desert as fog, quenching wildlife and oxidising the iron in the sand dunes to create their red colour. Highland water flows down the Kuiseb River greening the land to the north. In the south, as the Tsondab River hits the desert, water evaporates, leaving behind white salt and mineral deposits.
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The great desert
This shot of part of t he Sahara in Western Libya was captured by EarthKAM – a NASA programme where students from all over the world can ask for images to be taken from the International Space Station of specific locations on Earth. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, with northeasterly winds that can reach hurricane levels, and as little as 2.5cm of rain on average each year.
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Island birth
The world’s youngest island, Nishinoshima, is made up of two sections which formed over 60 years apart. The lower section was created in 1973 when an underwater volcano erupted, while the upper part first broke through the ocean’s surface in November 2013, merging with its neighbour soon after. Every day, the island produces 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of lava.
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At the heart of green energy
Over 4,000 mirrors direct sunlight to a boiler in a central tower at the Khi Solar One power plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. At full capacity the boiler heats up to a toasty 530ºC. The plant began commercial operation in February 2016, and supplies energy to around 45,000 homes.
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more in:
Earth from Above
Our planet as you’ve never seen it before

Part of the BBC Focus Magazine Collection

Prendre Conscience de la Fragilité de la Terre par Thomas Pesquet

Ce qui a le plus frappé le spationaute français pendant ses six mois dans la Station internationale, c’est la fragilité de la Terre: «l’atmosphère est vraiment une mince bande ridicule qui contient toute la vie. Autour, il n’y a rien, à des milliards d’années-lumière. J’ai vu la déforestation, les bandes rasées qui s’enfoncent dans les forêts en Amérique du Sud, les fleuves qui charrient des pollutions, des boues, le dégazage des bateaux, la pollution atmosphérique – je n’ai jamais pu prendre une photo de Pékin, par exemple. Voir tout cela, non plus seulement l’intellectualiser, ça change quelque chose… L’écologie, c’est bien, c’est important. Mais il est difficile de se représenter les problèmes, leur échelle nous dépasse. Là, j’ai vu, j’ai ressenti avec mes sens. Mince, c’est vrai, c’est là!

Risquer sa vie en allant dans l’espace fait réfléchir à ce qui est réellement important. J’aimerais que tous les décideurs de la planète voient le spectacle de la Terre depuis l’espace. Il n’y a pas de frontières. Il est extrêmement difficile de distinguer un pays d’un autre. La Terre n’est ni plus ni moins qu’un gros vaisseau spatial aux ressources limitées, avec un équipage de 7 milliards de personnes. La seule chose à faire, c’est de voyager en bonne intelligence et d’entretenir le vaisseau, comme nous le faisons avec l’ISS, pour que le voyage continue. Sinon, ça va s’arrêter très vite. Dans quelques centaines d’années, peut-être…»
lemonde.fr

Une Terre Si Fragile
Par Thomas Pesquet
© ESA / NASA

à voir dans Animan N201