Expert Lighting Control

Photography takes many forms. Sometimes a photographer simply comes upon a scene that they like, and they take the picture. Afterwards, they may alter the lighting ‘effects” in post-processing, (if the light wasn’t exactly what they were looking for). For this article, we culled our photographs from the “Lighting 101” challenge. We looked specifically for photographs that depicted a high level of skill and control in the lighting that was used at the point of creation (in-camera). Enjoy.

Waiting
by Torben Mougaard
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Jo.
by Joseph Balson
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Sensual Evening
by Mladen Dakic
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Bea Gardeberg
by Gabriel Riveros Vilches
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Anny
by Luca Foscili
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more in: “22 Outstanding Examples of Expert Lighting Control In Photography”
at gurushots

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Earth’s Finest Creatures

We culled this amazing selection of photographs from the “Majestic Mammals” challenge. If you’re an aspiring wildlife photographer- you’ll notice some common traits among these images. They are shot tight. People want to see the details of the animal. They have good light. Animal fur needs good light to show off the texture. They are often captured at peak action. Even a sleeping lion can have a moment of peak action!

The Mara Six
by Andy Howe
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photo by Vladimir Cech
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photo by Gal Meiri
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Spring Break
by Bragi Ingibergsson
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photo by Tomáš Svoboda
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more in “39 of Earth’s Finest Creatures”
at gurushots

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Rhythmic Images of Nature

Rhythm is defined as a regular repeated pattern with movement regulated by strong and weak succession. For the challenge titled, “Rhythmic Nature”, it was interesting to us how many photographers interpreted that concept as rays of light.

Photo by Antonio Tafuro
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Photo by Srdjan Pavar
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“Autumn Morning” by Mike Stuckey
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Photo by quaravinci
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“Sunrise over Misty Forest” by Tim Kirchoff
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Rhythmic Images of Nature
more at gurushots

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Point of View

Not all photographs need to be taken from our eye level – nor should they.
Changing your viewpoint is not only a great way to enhance composition, but it might also make your photograph stand out from all of the other eye-level views made of a similar subject.
Use your freedom to your aesthetic advantage and make images from creative viewpoints.

by Asle Haukland
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by Nathalia Nigro
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by Elena Karetina
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by Andy Fowlie
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by Kishor Patel
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Point of View Challenge
more at GuruShots

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Bokeh Galore

Bokeh can be defined as “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light”.

by Andrea Virág
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by Sean Scott
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by Veronika.Cervena
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by François Mahieu
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by Louis Benzell
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from “Bokeh Galore Challenge”
by Omar Bariffi

more at GuruShots

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The Challenge

Photographers are very familiar with the challenges faced in their line of work. They often have to deal with challenges in order to be able to capture the right image at the right moment and deliver the intended message or provoke the right feelings. However, this category is about conveying the theme of challenge in a clear manner either in the way the photograph was shot or in its content and subject matter. The scope is quite wide; the challenge could be shown in the composition of the picture, the arrangement of its elements, sequence, the lighting, or in expressing the odd and unusual (without digital manipulation). It can be in capturing a fleeting moment that may never pass again, or in delivering a piece of information or situation that is quite hard for most people to do. Don’t limit your mind to what the challenge may be; seek it and capture it.

Grang Prize Winner
Landfill Ballerina
Arash Yaghmaeian | United States of America
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1st Winner
A Butterfly in Water
Giulio Montini | Italy
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2nd Winner
Knowledge, the Most Powerful Weapon
Adel El Masri | Palestinian Territory
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3rd Winner
A Fight for Survival
Mohammad Khorshid | Kuwait
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The Challenge
more at HIPA