National Geographic Announces Winners of the 2017 Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

Selected from over 11,000 entries, a wildlife photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park has been selected as the grand-prize winner of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore.

— – —

2nd Place, Wildlife
Mother’s love
Photo and caption by Alejandro Prieto
An adult Caribbean pink flamingo feeds a chick in Yucatán, Mexico. Both parents alternate feeding chicks, at first with a liquid baby food called crop milk, and then with regurgitated food.

— – —

3rd Place, Wildlife
White Fighters
Photo and caption by Bence Mate
Two grey herons spar as a white-tailed eagle looks on in Hungary.

— – —

2nd Place, Landscapes
Dushanzi Grand Canyon
Photo and caption by Yuhan Liao
Sunlight glances off mineral strata of different colors in Dushanzi Grand Canyon, China.

— – —

1st Place Winner, Aerials
Rock Pool
Photo and caption by Todd Kennedy
In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps.

— – —

Winners of the 2017 Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
more at National Geographic

Advertisements

Galleries: People’s Choice

Vote for People’s Choice | You Be the Judge
Have a favorite photo entry? From December 1-11, 2017, our fans will vote for their favorite photos. Images with the most votes will be named the Peoples’ Choice winner. Return daily to vote for your top picks!

Kalsoy by Wojciech Kruczyński
— – —

Great Gray Owl by Harry Collins
— – —

Meandering Canyon by David Swindler
— – —

Fleet Departure by Kehao Tan
— – —

Drift by Matthew Smith
— – —

Showtime by Bence Mate
— – —

Nature Photographer of the Year Contest 2017
more at National Geographic

Nature Photographer of the Year Contest 2017

Wallpapers from the editors’ favorite submissions to the photo contest.

Lavender waves
Photo and caption by Ernie Black
I have photographed the hawaiian daytime octopus on multiple occasions and have never seen anything like this. i was lucky enough to intercept this one as it was shooting across the shallows from one patch of reef to another. although it did not ink, after a quick dart to its left, it hulted and took flower shape. i can only assume this was in attempts to intimidate me. the interaction only lasted a couple of seconds before it went to blend in with the reef, leaving me amazed.
— – —

Stealthy Eyes
Photo by Melissa Stevens
— – —

Moonrise
Photo by G. Ma
— – —

River Crossing – Bike Bridge – Thailand
Photo by T. Sweetman
— – —

Fast Food
Photo by Shane Kalyn
— – —

Sneeeze!
Photo by M. Engelmann
— – —

Nature Photographer of the Year Contest 2017
Wallpapers from the editors’ favorite submissions to the photo contest.
more at National Geographic

Top 10 Compact Cameras for Travelers

Upgrade your travel photos with these lightweight cameras that pack a punch.

Nat Geo Travel asked Tom O’Brien, photo engineer for National Geographic Magazine, to share his top picks for must-have compact cameras. These cameras are perfect for both traveling light and making incredible photos. Read about his favorites and start planning your next trip!
— – —

Fujifilm X-T2
For the traveler who wants the best model overall
Pick for Travelers: Over a year old now but the X-T2 still maintains its prowess of imaging excellence. The camera has everything one would want in a professional DSLR in a APS-C mirrorless camera. The combination of quality manual dials to control settings, speed of image processing, the amazing line lenses and the build quality make this camera such a pleasure to use that many professionals now use this camera as their main system. You simply cannot go wrong with the X-T2 as a high end travel camera; it’s an all-star, all-around team player that just won’t quit or let you down, no matter where your travels take you.
— – —

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II
For the technologically-demanding traveler
Pick for Travelers: The E-M1 Mk II is in the writer’s opinion the most technologically impressive camera on this list. In a package that is considerably smaller than professional DSLR cameras Olympus has placed imaging technologies that allow for mind-bending capture rates (both mechanical and electronic shutter speeds are class leading). The E-M1 MKII is easily the most weather sealed interchangeable lens camera on the market; I took it canoeing in the Florida springs and a few times splashed water directly onto the camera, it didn’t skip a beat. Olympus has legendary autofocus, allowing for sharp, fast, and accurate focusing on targets of all types and speeds. This means whether you find yourself at an air show shooting soaring planes or photographing a local parade of dancers at dusk, this camera will lock tightly to subjects. This is a truly versatile travel camera.
— – —

Sony a6500
For the app-loving traveler
Pick for Travelers: The a6000 series has become increasing popular with those looking to capitalize on Sony specific technologies while maintaining a very compact and relatively affordable camera; the a6500 is a the latest in this line. The a6500 is great for those that understands the shortcomings of the current generation of E-mount Sony cameras but wish to enter into the ever expanding Sony Alpha universe to reap the benefits of their sensor technologies. The a6500 is exceptionally compact and light for the sensor and technology is packs in. The shear popularity of this camera speaks to volumes about Sony imaging technology. In this iteration you will find a powerful 425-point phase detection autofocus system and an extended shooting buffer.
— – —

Olympus TG-5
For the water-loving traveler
Pick for Travelers: The Olympus TG-5 continues its line’s legacy as a top choice for a tough camera and entry level underwater camera. This iteration of the TG line makes an interesting design change from its predecessor, it has downsized its pixel count from 16 MP to 12 MP. To most this seems like an odd decision but in fact it is a move to increase the low light performance of the sensor. By reducing the pixel count, the pixels can be larger and thus gather light more efficiently, giving better performance in dim conditions such as underwater or at dusk. Make no mistake though, the sensor size is still ample for posting to the web and smaller prints. As usual the TG line of cameras, the TG -5 is the leader of the pack in tough cameras.
— – —

Top 10 Compact Cameras for Travelers
By Tom O’Brien
Photographs by Mark Thiessen

more at National Geographic

Nature Photographer of the Year Contest 2017

Wallpapers from the editors’ favorite submissions to the photo contest.

Weaver and nest by Federico Rizzato
— – —

lan Ha Bay by Son Tong
— – —

Flamingos and their Nests by Ge Xiao
— – —

Tonic of Wildness by Manish Mamtani
— – —

Antarctic Iceberg by Sam Edmonds
— – —

Nature Photographer of the Year Contest 2017
more wallpapers at National Geographic

Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

With a little more than a month to go, the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest is in full swing. Photographers have until November 17, 2017 to enter their best photographs valuing the beauty of the natural world.

Photo by Jay Ruan
— – —

Photo by Marc Hornig
— – —

Photo by Alexis Darden
— – —

Photo by Phillip Chang
— – —

Photo by Shane Kalyn
— – —

Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
more by Jessica Stewart at My Modern Met

These Breathtaking Natural Wonders No Longer Exist

Natural and manmade forces continue to reshape Earth’s landscape.

Jeffery Pine, Yosemite National Park
The dead and wind-battered Jeffery pine atop Yosemite’s Sentinel Dome, made famous by Ansel Adams, finally toppled in 2003. Some say the only tree in the scenic vista was one of the world’s most photographed trees, having been the star of glass plate images as early as the 1860s.
Photograph by Harald Sund
— – —

Slim River, Canada
In spring 2017, an entire river in Canada’s Yukon territory vanished seemingly overnight. The culprit was the retreat of the massive Kaskawulsh Glacier whose meltwater diverted from the Slim River to feed a different river. Scientists called it the first case of “river piracy” in modern times. These changes are also shrinking the Yukon’s largest lake. You can see Kluane Lake’s receding shoreline along Alaska Highway 1 and from points within Kluane National Park and Reserve.
Photograph by Alan Majchrowicz
— – —

Elephant Rock, Canada
Some 200 tons of rocks toppled from New Brunswick’s “Elephant Rock” Flowerpot Formation last spring, turning a peephole into a pile of rubble. The scenic spot in Hopewell Rocks Park was one of the most popular stops for travelers taking in the remarkably wide-ranging tides of the Bay of Fundy.
Photograph by Mike Grandmaison
— – —

Twelve Apostles Marine National Park, Australia
There’s a few less apostles in Australia’s Twelve Apostles Marine National Park. In 2005, one of the largest and most intricate of the offshore sea stacks crumpled into dust in front of a watching family. Already the remnants of pummeled cliffs, the heavy surf there means the remaining seven apostles aren’t far behind.
Photograph by David Noton
— – —

Legzira Beach, Morocco
Paragliders, surfers, fishermen, and a handful of in-the-know visitors who frequented Legzira Beach outside the city of Sidi Ifni in Morocco mourned when its twin red sea arch succumbed to the weight of the massive cliff above it in 2016. The rust-colored hideaway was a popular sunset scene; a similar setting can be found in the Jurassic-era red sea stacks of Landram Bay in Devon, England.
Photograph by Zzvet
— – —

Landscapes shape our sense of place, yet Earth is constantly changing. The forces of volcanism, wind, water, sun, and, yes, humans, conspire to transform what has been crafted into familiar terrain over millennia—pummeling cliffs into beaches, eroding vast canyons, forming new land with bubbling lava, and shifting the course of mighty rivers.

more by Meghan Miner Murray
at National Geographic