Inspire / Plan / Discover / Experience

Discover Japan with this essential travel guide, designed to help you create your own unique trip and to transport you to this fascinating country before you’ve even packed your case – catch the buzz of futuristic Tokyo, step back in time in Kyoto, hike in mountainous Hokkaido or snorkel in Okinawa’s clear waters. The DK Eyewitness Guide to Japan covers the must-see sights and the hidden backstreets, so you won’t miss a thing.

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DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Japan

more at dk.com

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Quel objectif pour le portrait?

Un portrait ? Avant de choisir un objectif, il est d’abord important de définir ce qu’on entend par portrait (en dehors du sujet lui même — on photographie bien évidemment une ou plusieurs personnes !). Il faut en effet définir comment le personnage sera cadré.

On distingue généralement cinq types de cadrages pour le portrait : le cadrage “en pied” (la personne est photographiée en entier, de la tête aux pieds, ce qui est parfois le cas en photo de mode), en “plan américain” (le modèle est coupé approximativement à mi-cuisse), en “plan taille” (le bas de l’image correspond aux hanches du sujet), en “plan buste” (tête et buste) et en “plan serré” (le visage uniquement).

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Quel objectif pour le portrait?
encore plus dans Réponses Photo

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Ultimate Wild White Horses

Innovating and evolving your photography
Serge Krouglikoff of Create Away shows how you can be inspired by others to create something completely new.

Photographer: Serge Krouglikoff
via Create Away
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Wildlife & Landscapes Photography Workshops, Tours & Holidays
“ The choice of the passionate photographer ”
No.1 specialist for Camargue photography
Create Away is the only photo tour company actually based in the Camargue, so we bring you exclusive and unique workshops, unavailable to everyone else. We also run photo tours in other regions of France, such as Provence, the Luberon and the Cote d’Azur
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more in “Photography Holidays & Courses Ultimate Guide 2019”
get it free at pocketmags

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The Essence of Photography: Seeing and Creativity

There is a lot more to photography than simply picking up a camera, pointing it toward something, and tripping the shutter. Achieving a great photograph requires thought and preparation, an understanding of the photographic process, and a firm grasp of how light and composition affect a photo. There must be personal involvement and personal expression. There must be experimentation, with the recognition that only a small percentage of experiments end successfully.

In this book, best-selling author and world-renowned photographer and teacher Bruce Barnbaum explores these seldom-discussed issues by drawing upon his personal experiences and observations from more than 40 years of photographing and teaching. In addition to photographs, Bruce also uses painting, music, and writing, as well as the sciences and even business, to provide pertinent examples of creative thinking. These examples serve as stepping-stones that will lead you to your own heightened ability to see and be creative.

Creativity is a topic that is almost wholly ignored in formal education because most instructors think that it cannot be taught or learned. To the contrary, Bruce has proven that photographic seeing and creativity can be taught, learned, and improved. This book expands on the ideas that are central to Bruce’s method of teaching photography, which he has used in workshops for the past 41 years.

The book is richly illustrated with over 90 photographs taken by Bruce as well as other photographers.Seeing and creativity are difficult to teach, but not impossible. This very different, perhaps groundbreaking book is sure to inspire photographers of all skill levels-from beginners to seasoned professionals-to think deeply about the issues involved in creating successful photographs.
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The Essence of Photography: Seeing and Creativity
by Bruce Barnbaum

Teach Yourself Fine Art Photography

Fine art photography is one of the most difficult genres to define. Everyone has their own interpretation and that is what makes it an incredibly exciting genre. It all begins with a concept. Fine art photography is a way of expressing a message or emotion. It is a way of pushing boundaries and creating more than just a photograph, and a way of creating a piece of art that would not look out of place on the wall of a gallery.

Teach Yourself Fine Art Photography introduces you to the idea of fine art photography and explains how to go from concept to execution. Discover how to refine your compositions, shoot stunningly striking black and white imagery, impactful portraits and tasteful nudes. Learn from the informative features and follow the in-depth shooting and editing tutorials that will help you to produce high-quality professional looking captures. If that wasn’t enough, hear from four experienced photographers about why they got into the genre and how they develop and produce a successful body of work.

The Photographer’s Mind Remastered: Creative Thinking for Better Digital Photos

You’ve done your research. You’ve bought your camera. You’ve learnt how to use it. Now what?

The secret behind a good photograph is not your camera. It’s not even the scene viewed through the viewfinder. It’s the mind of the photographer which turns an average photograph into an exceptional one.

In The Photographer’s Mind, professional photographer and author Michael Freeman unravels the mystery behind the creation of a photograph and reveals how to capture photos that really make you feel something.

The aim of this book is to answer what makes a photograph great, and explore the ways that top photographers achieve this goal time and time again.

The Photographer’s Mind will provide you with invaluable knowledge on:
· Avoiding cliché
· The recurring nature of trends
· Style and composition
· Capturing light
· How to handle the unexpected

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The Photographer’s Mind Remastered: Creative Thinking for Better Digital Photos
by Michael Freeman

The Lens: A Practical Guide for the Creative Photographer

Which lens should I buy for my camera?
It’s such a simple question, but choosing the right lens or lenses is actually one of the most important photographic decisions you can make. Nothing affects the quality of a photo more than the lens. It’s no longer just about the megapixels-it’s the glass that makes all the difference!
Many first-time buyers of DSLRs don’t venture past the basic lens included in the box. While some are reluctant to spend more money, others are confused by all the buzzwords or are overwhelmed by all the choices out there. It’s really a shame, because interchangeable lenses give you amazing scope for quality photography.

Take in vast sweeping scenes with a wide angle lens. Capture faraway birds with a telephoto lens. Examine the tiniest detail of a flower with a macro lens. Record the perfect portrait with a prime lens. Anything is possible when you choose the right lens for the job!
This book isn’t a simple catalogue of available lenses. New products are coming out all the time, and comparing specific lenses can be difficult. Instead, author N.K. Guy gives you all the information you need to make smart buying decisions. Optical technology is demystified, arcane terminology is decoded, and practical tips are provided.
The Lens will help you build the perfect lens collection to suit your needs-now and in the future.

Mad scientist’s lair. Set design by Catie Max, Ed Saperia and the Clockwork Quartet, and NK Guy. Steamdrone by Will Segerman and Joe Schermoly. The Shunt Lounge and Theatre Company. London Bridge, London, England. 17mm full frame. f/6.3, 3.2 sec. ISO 100.
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Archer. This shot was illuminated solely by the two flaming light sources. A very fast lens set to f/1.2 was used, so the depth of field was extremely shallow. Highbury, London, England. 85mm full frame. f/1.2, 1/8 sec. ISO 200.
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Blast furnace 5 of the former Meiderich Ironworks. The site closed in 1985 and is now part of Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord, a fantastic public park focused on memorializing Germany’s industrial heritage. Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Landscape architecture by Latz+Partner. Lighting design by Jonathan Park. 16mm full frame. f/7.1, 30 sec. ISO 200.
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Rainforest Tree, a 40 meter/130 foot sculpture designed by Wolfgang Volz and constructed by Clostermann Entertainment. Located within the Gasometer Oberhausen, a vast 100 meter/330 foot tall decommissioned gas storage tank in Oberhausen, Germany, now used for exhibitions and events. 16mm full frame. f/6.3, 30 sec. ISO 200.
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Meoto Iwa, the Wedded Rocks. A heavy rice straw rope links these two small near-shore rocks, representing the sacred bond of marriage. This is cool, but I have to say the woman rock is really unfairly small.Futami, Mie, Japan. In order to transform the ocean waves into a ghostly haze, an 8x neutral density filter was used along with a very low ISO and a tiny lens aperture. This allowed a comparatively long exposure of 20 seconds in full daylight. 50mm full frame. f/22, 20 sec. ISO 50.
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Valentine Cave is a lava tube formed over 30,000 years ago. Flows of molten lava created hollow tube-like caves when the surface crusted over while lava continued to flow below. Lava Beds National Monument, California, USA. The simulated anamorphic lens flare is described in section 9.11. 29mm full frame. f/5.0, 2 sec. ISO 100.
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The Lens: A Practical Guide for the Creative Photographer
Author N.K. Guy