Eclectic aesthetic fine art

John Kosmopoulos is a multiple award-winning photorapher based in Toronto who embodies an “eclectic aesthetic fine art” (EAFA) philosophy of photography.
He specializes in black and white, infrared and “muted color metallics” photography.

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Eclectic aesthetic fine art
by John Kosmopoulos

more in Photographize Magazine

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Infrared Chernobyl by Vladimir Migutin

Infrared filters are known for creating a weird, eerie mood in pictures, no matter what you’re capturing. That is why taking a filter like that to an already haunting-looking place like Chernobyl might make the scenery pictures you take look even more impressive. Photographer Vladimir Migutin did just that on his trip to the town in Ukraine that suffered the infamous nuclear disaster.

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from: Chernobyl Shot With Infrared Photography Looks More Haunting Than Ever (Interview)
by​ Iveta

continue at Bored Panda

Hi-tech Tokyo

Sam Pritchard is captivated by Japan’s futuristic architecture at night.

Tokyo has been destroyed and reconstructed twice in the twentieth century, so compared to London and other European cities that exhibit more of a fusion of classical and modern architecture, Tokyo’s skyline and fabric appears to be more modern, consisting largely of buildings built during the bubble economy. Buildings made of stone or brick are an exception – everything seems to be clad in glass, tile or synthetic material. There are hardly any arches either – everything is straight lines and the sloped angles of the upper floors of apartment buildings seem synonymous with Tokyo. This adds to the Lego-like appearance.

The high population density requires that available living space is used efficiently and innovatively, so you can find anything from sports grounds to driving schools on the rooftops. This density and constant activity give it a futuristic vibe, while the fluorescent neon signage illuminates the city at night.

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Hi-tech Tokyo

more in EOS Magazine

Street Photography | Denys Nevozhai

Street Photography by Denys Nevozhai

Steam-powered police car.
Manhattan is a special place for photography. You can find funny scenes on every step.
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Flatiron permanence.
I had to spend like 15 minutes sitting in crooked position on the ground to take many many shots with different exposures. Beauty is everywhere.
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Street Style Sunset.
This sunset was possible because of the street that ends at the waterfront of the Hudson River in New York.
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Cyber noir.
Took this shot from the top of a tunnel in San Francisco downtown.
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Street Photography
Photographer: Denys Nevozhai
via BackDoor Magazine

Urban Exploring | The Smartphone Way

Somewhere near you, a building lies empty. There are no footsteps to be heard in the hallways. The abandoned possessions of previous occupants litter the floor like leaves on the street. Perhaps there’s some old machinery, or a grand stage that’s no longer the center of attention. All the light is natural, and the elements are slowly breaking down the shell around you.

Photo by David Capponi
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Photo by Christian Feichtner
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Photo by David Capponi
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Photo by Christian Feichtner
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Urban Exploring
The Smartphone Way

by Mark Myerson in Mobiography

Projections | Sabine Wild

London, Paris, Rome, Berlin – Sabine Wild toured Europe’s major cities armed with a camera, ready to transform monuments and skylines in her very special way. Her architectural images are works of art composed of structures and light. Wild captures the world in lines. Her typical vertical and horizontal hatching creates a flickering structure. A fascinating picture in which only hints of the underlying reality remain.

Thanks to Sabine Wild, the Römer in Frankfurt seems like a gothic convention of lights. At the same time, it is not a picture that gives off a feeling of medieval confinement; bright and fresh colours dominate. In the Sachenshäuser Ufer, the artist brings a natural element into her normally very abstract visual language. Arising from the “real” cityscape, the wintry boughs are naturally formed shapes that do not want to assimilate into the horizontal lines of the river or the verticals lines of the Frankfurt skyline. In this way, Wild’s art creates an exciting contrast between art and reality, between alienation and naturalness.

In New York Projections and Asian Projections, Sabine Wild discovers the beauty of the night, which experiences a special appeal in cities full of artificial lights. The lit-up buildings, streetlights, and headlights serve as creative material for the artist’s urban compositions. Luminous batches of colour break through the graphical austerity that Wild otherwise consistently sticks to. The famous skylines of New York, Hong Kong, and Shanghai appear as if painted: Action Painting 2.0.

Sabine Wild has further developed her vertical-line visual language and discovered the digital means for creating her work. In post-processing, she designs her thrilling compositions – dark horizontal and vertical lines stand by powerful colours, painterly passages by graphical areas. As in painting, the energetic way the colour is applied determines the effect the image has. Sabine Wild reveals a new, impressive look at the world and its architecture.

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Projections
by Sabine Wild

more at Lumas