Games of Light & Shadow in Architecture

As an architect/international bridge engineer, I have been fortunate enough to visit a lot of places not only in Tokyo, but also around the world for various large architectural and bridge structure projects, including my own engineering achievement. Firstly, I brought a camera just for taking shots such of the interesting scenery in foreign countries.

But gradually my mind has been changed. The reason why I’m interested in photography came initially from simply taking photographs of the bridges and buildings I’ve designed; however, recently I saw some wonderfully artistic, architectural photographs in several web galleries and international photograph magazines and have been passionately interested in such the category of fine-art photography by my own ever since. —Dr. Akira Takaue

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Games of Light & Shadow in Architecture
by Dr. Akira Takaue
more in Lens Magazine

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Creative eye | Howard Kingsnorth

Photography has never been in a better place than it is right now. As the primary medium for ‘instant’ communicaton, it is now accessible to all. The alchemy that we used to enjoy: with the mysteries of film and exposure, the darkened rooms and chemicals, have all but been transcended by a small device that fits in your pocket and can send images anywhere in an instant. The digital revolution has enabled photographers and clients to push visual boundaries and enhance concepts, simply due to the power of instant review.
I love new tech. I’m always looking at it, buying it and playing with it.
Advances in digital manipulaton and capture are bound to make a difference to what we see today. More access for less able photographers and unskilled operators has been the trend lately, and that will only continue. A general dumbing down and consensus ‘look’ is what I see, especially in the fashion and celebrity world. But like any trend, there is a point when it will feel worn out and unable to go any further.

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Creative eye | Howard Kingsnorth
more in f11 Magazine

Women in photography: Jumana Jolie and the rise of Dubai

Photojournalist and aerial photographer Jumana Jolie grew up in Dubai in the 1980s, when it was a developing desert town – long before it became a synonym for futuristic cityscape living and air-conditioned luxury.

With more than 250 posts on Instagram, as @pixelville, Jumana has attracted a global audience of more than 100K followers thanks to her vertiginous photographs from city rooftops. She shoots in what look like terrifyingly dangerous places, between impossibly high-mirrored towers, using her Canon EOS 5D Mark III. “I play with angles – it’s all about perspective,” she says. “It started out as a hobby – off the back of my love of architecture. I’d look up and think, ‘Wow, that building is beautiful from here, but I wonder what it would look like from up there?’ It’s so different, seeing the world from above.”
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Women in photography: Jumana Jolie and the rise of Dubai
more at Canon

Architecture by Andy Vannecke

My name is Andy Vannecke, I’m 34 years old and live in Belgium. I have been really active in the world of photography since past 2 years. My focus genre has been architecture in long exposure.
Architecture photography has become my passion; every location seems to challenge me to find the best possible composition for a picture.

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Architecture by Andy Vannecke
more in WePhoto

The Legendary Urbexer of Abandoned Planet: Andre Govia

Andre Govia also works in the flm and television industries. Tis has offered him numerous opportunities to shoot and discover abandoned locations. He is known for his work on Winter Ridge (2018), The Enfield Haunting (2015) and 24: Live Another Day (2014). When it comes to Bando photography, Andre Govia is a legend among urban explorers. Having explored over 900 deserted locations in more than 22 countries, Govia’s eight-year project shooting abandoned buildings is showcased in his premier publication: Abandoned Planet.

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The Legendary Urbexer of Abandoned Planet: Andre Govia
more in Inspades Magazine

Shanghai From Above

These magnificent views of Shanghai from above were taken by drone by German design director Mark Siegemund, who presents the juxtaposition of tradition and modernity of this dynamic city in a series of breathtaking images. A river divides the old center from the new, and we are treated to views of the ancient winding streets, mid-level housing, temples and dizzying bridges of Puxi, as well as the soaring high-rise buildings and towers of the Pudong business district. Whether shot at night or bathed in morning light, Siegemund’s photography captures the energy and vibrancy of his adopted city.

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more from “Breathtaking Views of Shanghai From Above”
by Mark Siegemund

at Fubiz