Great Outdoors

The grand prize in the 2019 Great Outdoors Photo Contest goes to Richard Langer for the image, “Napali Storm”.

Sony a7R II, Sony FE 24-240mm f3.5-6.3 OSS at 24mm. Exposure: 1/1000 sec., ƒ/6.3, ISO 320.
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Second place in the 2019 Great Outdoors Photo Contest goes to Douglas Croft for the image, “River Bend”.

Nikon D7000, AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR. Exposure: 1/200 sec., ƒ/8, ISO 200.
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Third place in the 2019 Great Outdoors Photo Contest goes to Kelly Moran for the image, “Big Sky Country”.

Canon EOS-1D X, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM at 25mm. Exposure: 1/8000 sec., ƒ/3.2, ISO 100.
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Finalist Klaus Priebe

Nikon D810, Nikon 14-24mm lens at 16mm, Induro CT315 tripod, Arca Swiss ballhead, Really Right Stuff 60mm lever release clamp, Nikon remote trigger with mirror-up shooting. f/11, ISO 100.
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Finalist Jason Stewart

Canon EOS 5DS R, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, Benro TMA48CXL Mach 3 9X Carbon Fiber, BENRO G3 Low Profile Ballhead with PU70 Plate. Exposure: 15 sec., f/14, ISO 100.
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more finalist of the 2019 Great Outdoors Photo Contest
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The American Landscape

We received more than 1,700 submissions to our 2019 The American Landscape Photography Contest. The following slideshow displays our 25 finalist images, as well as the three winning shots!

The Stars Above
by Ryan Lips
Nikon D-810, Nikkor 16-35mm at 23mm, Acratech ballhead, Feisol tripod. Exposure: 22 sec., ƒ/4, ISO 1600
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Lake Moultrie Sunset
by Robert Golub
Nikon D850, Nikon 24-120mm F/ 4.0 lens at 105mm, Gitzo traveler tripod. Exposure: 0.6 sec., ƒ/22, ISO 64
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Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes, Death Valley National Park
by Jeffrey Lapid
Nikon D850, 24-70mm lens at 70mm. Exposure: ƒ/2.8. ISO 1000
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Death Valley At Dawn
by Charles Sleicher
Canon SLR, Canon 50mm f2 lens, Fuji Velvia ISO 50 film, tripod
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Cook Meadow Moonlight
by Abe Blair
Nikon D850, Zeiss Milvus 18mm 2.8 lens, Benro Adventure tripod and matching head, Lee 2-stop soft edge grad. Exposure: 30 sec., ƒ/13, ISO 800
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The American Landscape
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Does Camera Sensor Size Matter?

How to evaluate the advantages of full-frame versus smaller sensors when choosing a camera
Text & Photography by Josh Miller

Does camera sensor size really matter anymore? As photographers, we have never had so many great camera options that will produce amazing images. There are very capable cameras sporting everything from Micro Four Thirds sensors to APS-C, full-frame and all the way up to massive medium-format sensors. …

… Having shot with everything from Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras to Fujifilm and Sony APS-C to Nikon full-frame DSLRs, and most recently with Nikon Z mirrorless, I can honestly say all three sensor formats will meet the needs of nearly all photographers. Having been a Nikon shooter for more than 20 years, I’m most familiar with that system, but over the last few years, I have owned or used all the other systems extensively in an effort to reduce my weight and also see where the future lies. In my experience with current cameras in these various formats, any camera with at least 20-megapixel resolution will make great prints up to 20×30-inches or larger, assuming you are shooting at reasonable ISOs with quality lenses and good technique. …

… So how do you decide? With all the sensor formats being so good, I wouldn’t actually make sensor size my No. 1 determining factor when choosing to invest in a system. I would decide how good is good enough in terms of image quality and then look more broadly at the lenses and accessories being offered with the system. …
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Does Camera Sensor Size Matter?
by Josh Miller

more at Outdoor Photographer

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The 2019 Wildlife Photo Contest

Wildlife Photo Contest Winners

Grand Prize Dennis Stogsdill
Surrounded By Chaos
We were watching yet another great crossing at the peninsula crossing when I noticed the thousands of wildebeests start to “back up” as they struggled to climb out of the Mara River. And then out of the corner I could see a lone zebra joining the fray so I locked my lens on him and watched as he attempted to progress through the mass of wildebeest and was able to snap off just this one shot.
Canon 1Dx Mark II, 1/640 sec at f8, ISO 1250
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Second Prize Jenny Loren
Becoming a Cheetah
In the Maasai Mara we were able to spend time with a female cheetah and her three cubs. We watched the mom as she attempted to hunt and we even saw her fight off a hyena that was trying to get her cubs one day. It’s a tough life for the mom. Meanwhile her cubs like to have a lot of fun. On this day while she was looking for prey they took off into a field chasing each other around playing. What we noticed is that they were gaining a lot of the skills they would need as adults to survive. They had a good time jumping on each other dragging the other one down. But the one that stood out was seeing them run. They were getting ready for speed.
400mm 2.8, ISO 800, 1/3200, Canon 1DX
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Third Prize Eric Williamson
Sea Bears
Sea Bears photo was taken on July 11, 2015 on the beach of Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. A very fogging morning and our plane was on standby. The tide was out and these two COY’s (cub or the year) were out with mom learning how to dig up clams to eat. This photo was taken as the two were following mom to a new clamming spot. I was able to get the lens low at their level in order to keep the perspective correct.
Equipment Used: Camera: Canon EOS-1D Mark IV Lens: Canon 500mm, f4, IS Support: Really Right Stuff 34L tripod Head: Really Right Stuff BH55 ball head with a Wimberly Side Kick gimbal.
Photo Specs: Focal Length: 500mm F number: f/5 Exposure time: 1/500 ISO: 1250 Metering mode: Spot
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Finalist Don Martin
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Finalist Butch Mazzuca
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The 2019 Wildlife Photo Contest
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Moody Landscapes | Moody Wildlife

Learn how to capture mood in your landscape and wildlife photos
by Russ Burden

Depending on where you live, clouds may dominate your skies for 250-plus days of the year. This is more the norm around coastal areas and is governed by the seasons. I’m lucky to live in Colorado where I have just the opposite: 250 to 300-plus days of sunshine. But from a photographer’s standpoint, the word “lucky” can be deceiving. If my pursuit is wildlife, I’m ecstatic if I’m bestowed crisp bright mornings or afternoons of sun bathing my subject in warm golden light. But from a landscape photographer’s viewpoint, things are different. Where’s the drama in the light? Where’s the mood? Where’s the color? Since cloudy or severe, clear blue sky days are more the norm, I welcome days of fog, mood, haunting skies and drama with open arms. The rarity of these conditions is what allows landscape photographs to stand apart from those that are made under “ordinary” conditions. It’s with this in mind I devote this week’s and next week’s Tips of the Week to photos that resonate with mood.

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Moody Landscapes | Moody Wildlife
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