Looking for whales: An exhibition by Wade and Robyn Hughes

Looking for Whales premiered at Fremantle’s iconic Kidogo ArtHouse gallery on 26 October 2017 and ran until November 1. The exhibition attracted extensive media coverage, and more than 800 people came to visit the exhibition.
There are two elements to the exhibition: the prints of whales, and accompanying storyboards. In the story boards we’ve added imagery and texts to help add background and context to the behaviour illustrated in the prints.
Taken collectively, it is our hope that these two elements might just inspire you too, to go looking for whales.

Looking for whales: An exhibition by Wade and Robyn Hughes
more at: Wade and Robyn Hughes

images via Underwater Photography | Your Free Web Magazine

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Cheryl Walsh – A Water World

Cheryl Walsh describes her work as ‘Fantastical Underwater Portraits’. In the depths of her backyard swimming pool in Southern California, she works with the quiet currents that slow down time, bring vibrancy to colors, and leave her subjects virtually weightless. Her vision, coupled with her masterful printing technique, has won her an array of accolades, including over 60 WPPI print and image competition awards.

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Cheryl Walsh – A Water World
more in:
Cameracraft Magazine

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017 | Gallery 2017

View the winning images selected by our international jury. Wildlife Photographer of the Year champions ethical photography. Images are chosen for their artistic composition, technical innovation and truthful interpretation of the natural world.

The Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Single Image
Investigating the relationship between humans and the natural world. Images can be challenging, uplifting, provocative or revelatory.
Children of the rainforest | Finalist 2017 | Charlie Hamilton James, UK
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Behaviour: Invertebrates
Revealing the most interesting or memorable behaviour of any of the multitude of smaller animals without backbones – whether on land, in the air or in water.
Wings of winter | Finalist 2017 | Imre Potyó, Hungary
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Animal Portraits
Revealing the personality of an individual or an intimate group of animals in a thought-provoking or memorable way.
Contemplation | Winner 2017 | Peter Delaney, Ireland/South Africa
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Animals in their Environment
Evoking atmosphere and a sense of place – with the habitat as a major element of the image -to convey how an animal is an integral part of its environment.
The night raider | Winner 2017 | Marcio Cabral, Brazil
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Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles
Revealing active behaviour that adds to our understanding of the nature of a species.
The ancient ritual | Winner 2017 | Brian Skerry, USA
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Under Water
Revealing life underwater, whether portraying a particular marine or freshwater environment.
Circle of life | Finalist 2017 | Jordi Chias Pujol, Spain
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Young awards 2017
11–14 Years Old
Wolf watch | Finalist 2017 | Lasse Kurkela, Finland
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Young awards 2017
10 Years and Under
Black kites, red sunset | Finalist 2017 | Dhyey Shah, India
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Behaviour: Mammals
Portraying memorable, unusual or dramatic behaviour.
Spring release | Finalist 2017 | John Mullineux, South Africa
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Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017 | Gallery 2017
A lot more at National History Museum

2017 Windland Smith Rice Awards

The NATURE’S BEST™ concept began with simple yet dynamic goals: to celebrate the beauty and diversity of nature through the art of photography, and to use this far-reaching medium as a creative tool for encouraging greater public interest in outdoor enjoyment and conservation stewardship. The annual Windland Smith Rice International Awards program evolved from this ambitious mission to become one of the most highly-respected and visually compelling nature photography competitions in the world. More than 26,000 entries are received and judged in the Awards competition.

Grand Prize
African Lionesses by Lakshitha Karunarathna
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Youth Photographer of the Year
Brown Bear Cubs by Ashleigh Scully, at age 15
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Nature in Motion Winner
Starling and Falcon Dance by Nick Dunlop
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Landscapes Winner
Colima Volcano by Sergio Tapiro Velasco
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Birds Winner
Western Grebes by Thanh Tran
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Ocean Views Winner
California Sea Lions by Andrew Sallmon
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African Wildlife Winner
Reticulated Giraffes by Piper Mackay
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Highly Honored
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2017 Windland Smith Rice Awards
more at Nature’s Best Photography

Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

With a little more than a month to go, the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest is in full swing. Photographers have until November 17, 2017 to enter their best photographs valuing the beauty of the natural world.

Photo by Jay Ruan
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Photo by Marc Hornig
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Photo by Alexis Darden
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Photo by Phillip Chang
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Photo by Shane Kalyn
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Amazing Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
more by Jessica Stewart at My Modern Met

2017 Underwater Photographer of the Year Results Announced!

2017 Underwater Photographer of the Year Results Announced!

upoty2017aWinner
‘Dancing Octopus’
Gabriel Barathieu (France)
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upoty2017bBritish Underwater Photographer of the Year 2017
Winner
‘Out of the Blue’
Nick Blake (UK)
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upoty2017cMacro
Winner
‘Prey?’
So Yat Wai (Hong Kong)
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upoty2017dBehaviour
Winner
‘Your home and my home’
Qing Lin (Canada)
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upoty2017ePortrait
Winner
‘Face to face’
Ifj Lorincz Ferenc (Hungary)
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“From my own point of view, I have been captivated not only by the winning images but also by the stories behind how those images were achieved. The conception, the planning and the physical effort to achieve a successful result; it is those efforts that we, as judges, pay our respects to by taking out two days to meet up, sit together and look in detail at all the images. It is a mammoth task but one that we all agree is a privilege to be part of.”
Peter Rowlands, Chair of the jury 2017
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more at Underwater Photographer of the Year

How the Parks of Tomorrow Will Be Different

How the Parks of Tomorrow Will Be Different
Shrinking glaciers, ocean acidification, and drought are three consequences of a warming planet, and each threatens to alter our national parks. Photographer Keith Ladzinski takes us on an immersive tour of America’s treasured—and changing—places.

parks11a parks11b parks11c parks11d parks11eAmerica’s most special places will always be beautiful, but a warming climate forces us to accept that they can’t be frozen in time.
By Michelle Nijhuis
Photographs and Videos by Keith Ladzinski

This story appears in the December 2016 issue of National Geographic magazine.
more at National Geographic