Through the Photographer’s Eye

A photographer often sees the world in a different way to everyone else, making the invisible visible.

Wistmans wood, Dartmoor
by Richard Limb
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Regression
by Richard Lingo
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Underneath
by Paul C
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Jan Shooting At Marilyn Pond In Infrared
by Mike Cunningham
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The dark Hedges from the south west
by Paul Nash
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Through the Photographer’s Eye
more at photocrowd

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The Invisible World | Photographer: Luciano Demasi

Luciano Demasi’s photo activity is focused on “capturing the uniqueness of each moment nature provides with its immense and stunning endless beauty”. He took photos in San Diego East County (including Anza-Borrego Desert) and US national parks.

His real artistic love is for infrared photography: “the invisible world is first imagined, then captured, and finally brought to life, to unleash creativity, passion, and emotions.The invisible world is part of our reality and infrared photography is what unveils true beauty by enhancing our perception”

The Canyon
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Looking at the view while dancing
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The Royal Tree
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Reflection
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View from the volcano in Hawaii (2)
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Photographer: Luciano Demasi
more at kolarivision

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Infrared | Helen Bradshaw

Helen Bradshaw Photography

Artists’ Statement
The ability to freeze a moment of time and preserve its essence so that others can cherish the emotions which it invokes within oneself is why I am fascinated with photography. I aim to do more than simply capture pieces of time; I aspire to shape these images in such a way that they will enrapture the mind and soul of any who lay eyes upon them.

Everyday of our lives, we awaken to a realm teeming with surreal scenery, yet, most people’s lives are too busy to fully appreciate the artistry that surrounds them. Therefore, I strive to capture that beauty in my work with stunning color combinations and clear, simple composition. Personally, I feel that my photographs are most successful, when, not only do they exhibit visual beauty, but also inspire an emotional connection with anyone who sees them. I endeavor to have my photographs draw people in and allow them to experience a mystical world that is not often seen.

Nature contains a rich variety of scenery just waiting to be made into something magical. For all the work involved in finding the perfect image, a truly mesmerizing photograph is one to treasure. Without the outlook of artist, it would be nigh impossible to achieve such marvelous representations of Mother Nature’s radiant beauty.

When I work, I prefer to keep all aspects of my composition in the most straightforward and natural form as is attainable. Long before I click the shutter of the camera, I have envisioned how the image will be received.
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Infrared | Helen Bradshaw
via kolarivision

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Beyond Visible Light

For a different look at color photography, try these shooting and processing tips using infrared digital capture
Text & Photography by Russell Hart

Cranes Feeding At Sunset, Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
The light was pretty warm already when I photographed these cranes eating the corn that’s fed to them in winter at New Mexico’s Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Infrared turned the sky yellowish-orange, and that color is reflected in the marshy pools of the Rio Grande Valley. I took the photograph handheld, braced on the top of my car, with a Nikon 70-200mm ƒ/4 and 1.4x teleconverter. The lens was zoomed all the way in, giving me an effective focal length of 280mm that helped create the picture’s flat, “compressed” appearance. I kept the shutter speed high enough (1/250 sec.) to reasonably freeze the redwinged blackbirds flying in front of the mountains and stopped down to ƒ/13 to make sure everything was sharp from front to back.

The trees on the mountains, and, to a lesser extent, the brush surrounding the water, have the typical blue-green (cyan) color that digital infrared capture renders foliage. It was a little too blue for my taste, so I altered it in Photoshop to make it greener and therefore natural, though I didn’t take it all the way. Instead of using saturation sliders to do this, I went into the Selective Color control, increasing the yellow in the image’s blues and reducing magenta in the image’s greens, among a few other adjustments. Selective Color isn’t a control typically used much by photographers but is one I’ve found useful for subtle tweaking of color with infrared.
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Beyond Visible Light
by Russell Hart

more in: Outdoor Photographer Magazine
Vol. 35 No. 8 | September 2019

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Digital Infrared Photography

I am so excited to be able to write this book and share with you what I have learned about digital IR photography. Infrared photography is easily attainable by the novice and professional alike. Why? Because it’s digital! We have transcended film photography and now have the wonderful opportunity to be able to photograph digitally. No darkrooms, no chemicals, no worries about light leaking in and ruining precious film. We are free to experiment over and over; the learning curve is much less steep. We can truly be artists and are limited only by our imaginations.
—Deborah Sandidge

Infrared light offers photographers another artistic avenue to explore. You don’t need years of experience or expensive equipment. Just grab an IR filter or a converted digital camera, and you’re ready to enter the fascinating world of infrared photography. The unique effects you can create with IR photography are limited only by your imagination. In these pages, you’ll discover the practical information about file formats and composition as well as plenty of creative inspiration.
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Digital Infrared Photography
by Deborah Sandidge
via archive

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“I Rode A Bike Down The Blue Mountain In Jamaica And Took These Infrared Photos”

Earlier this year I traveled to Jamaica with my infrared camera. I drove from Montego Bay to Blue Mountain where coffee and, most likely, a lot of Ganja grows.
There was a bike tour down the Blue Mountain, so I jumped on and photographed the entire mountain on the way down. Here are some pictures of my trip.
by Shawn Angelski

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“I Rode A Bike Down The Blue Mountain In Jamaica And Took These Infrared Photos”
by Shawn Angelski
more at bored panda

Shades of Color | Martin Zalba

The night landscapes master is now exploring a new way with infrared without losing an inch of style.
“From the first moment I started in earnest with photography, night photography caught my attention powerfully. It was a very expressive technique. At night there is little light, the night is quite unknown to us … Nature looks different, there is a magic light, it is a different way of seeing things.”

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Martin Zalba Photography
more in Shades of Color Magazine