See the most breathtaking national parks around the world

The United States may lay claim to the world’s first national park, but it’s far from the only country whose most prized lands are officially protected by the government.

After the establishment of Yellowstone in 1872, the national park concept took hold across America and beyond. Canada founded its first national parks in the 1880s; the idea eventually spread across the Atlantic to Great Britain after World War I, then later to its colonies. Japan and Mexico embraced the concept in the 1930s and dozens of other countries followed suit over the course of the 20th century.

Banff National Park, Canada
Photograph by Jenn Ackerman and Tim Gruber
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Goreme National Park, Turkey
Photograph by Polina Nagareva
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Torres del Paine National Park, Chile
Photograph by Michael Melford
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Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia
Photograph by Robert Harding
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Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Australia
Photograph by Grant Faint
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See the world’s most beautiful national parks
From ancient rock formations in Australia to towering glaciers in Patagonia, here are 20 of our favorite national parks.
By Erica Jackson Curran

more at National Geographic

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A Year In The National Parks

For the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service, I had a dream assignment. I traveled to and photographed all 59 (at the time) of the U.S. national parks in one year on assignment for National Geographic. While other Nat Geo photographers were spending up to a year on assignment in a single national park, I was racing through them at breakneck speed. It was a whirlwind year flled with more beauty and nature than any one person should ever get to experience in such a short timeframe.

Sometimes during this project, I felt like it was completely unfair to take credit for any photos because it was truly nature that was doing all the heavy lifting.
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Ten highlights from an epic tour photographing all of the U.S. national parks
Text & Photography Jonathan Irish

more in Outdoor Photographer

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A Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite

There are few places in the world that are as beautiful and inspiring as Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. When it comes to iconic locations that define a country such as the United States, it is hard not think of images of Half Dome or Yosemite Falls, both of which have been made famous over the years by photographers such as Ansel Adams and Galen Rowell that each helped define photography for their respective generations.
by Colby Brown

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A Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite
by Colby Brown
more at Alpha Universe

Landscapes by Charley Moore

Charley Moore is an explorer. He spends most of his time in National parks, searching for magnifcent landscapes and wildlife. Charles and Deborah Lupica met him in Utah for a lengthy interview.

I started in photography about 15 years ago by accident more or less. I had no intention of being a photographer. But working for the tour company, that I eventually owned, I was taking photographers on tours and I got interested, initially using point and shoot cameras that were easy replaced because I dropped a few in the sand and banged them into canyon walls while climbing in the canyons. Paying attention to photographers on my tours to what they were doing and listening to them talking and asking lots of question, I eventually got my frst DSLR. People liked the way I saw things, my creativity with the camera and knowing what the camera could do for me. I started doing more and more photography tours and that is how I got really interested in photography and it became a profession for me.
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Landscapes by Charley Moore
via Shades of Color Magazine

U.S. UNESCO Sites: Present and Proposed

From the glowing lava flows of Hawaii to the pearly ice fields of Alaska, the United States’ natural and cultural heritage is as vast and diverse as the country itself. The U.S. currently claims 23 UNESCO World Heritage sites, which capture thousands of years of natural history and human innovation. An additional 20 natural and cultural sites ranging from under-the-sea monuments to urban architectural wonders are also vying for the renowned title. Find out which sites have already been inscribed for their “outstanding universal value,” and which tentative sites may join the list soon.

Redwood National Park
Photograph by Paul Giamou, Getty Images
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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Photograph by Art Wolfe, Getty Images
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Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument
Photograph by PJF Military Collection/Alamy Stock Photo
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Yellowstone National Park
Photograph by Tom Murphy, National Geographic Creative
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Alaskan Glaciers
Photograph by Frans Lanting, National Geographic Creative
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from “43 Incredible Photos of U.S. UNESCO Sites: Present and Proposed”
more at National Geographic