Yellowstone in Winter

Yellowstone National Park is the oldest and most picturesque National Park in the world. It is home to a vast number of unique hydrothermal wonders and contains 67 species of mammals, hundreds of species of birds, fish, amphibians, and reptiles.

— – —

Yellowstone in Winter
more at Muench Workshops

— – —

Tips to Improve Your Winter Compositions

Is winter photography really any different from that of other seasons? Yes, and no. The basics of landscape photograph apply regardless of the season, but my approach and preparedness can be different in the winter. Here are some tips that might help you improve your winter compositions
By Peter Baumgarten

Focus on winter’s unique features
Winter definitely has elements that no other season has – mainly, ice and snow. Incorporate them as key subjects in your compositions. Sometimes those ice formations may not look all that impressive from the height of a 6’2″ photographer like myself. That’s when I get in close, shoot low and use an ultra-wide angle lens, making them look larger and more dramatic than they really are. By getting in close you can also take advantage of how nicely some ice features can transmit the light.

— – —

Focus in on the details
This strategy works regardless of the season. Rather than just looking at the big picture spend some time focusing in on the minutiae of the scene. Frost and ice can really make a plain subject pop. Areas with open water, or nights with higher humidity can create some great hoarfrost when the thermometer dips below freezing.

— – —

Visit a National Park
National parks are amazing locations during any season. Some of my most memorable, and photographically fruitful trips have been made during the winter months. A fresh blanket of snow can add to that already stunning scenery. And the added benefit is that there will be far fewer people to contend with.

— – —

Make your own point of interest
In each of the photos in this article I have tried to include at least one key element that your eye will be drawn to. Sometimes you get to a location and there really isn’t anything that jumps out at you and screams, “Photograph me!”. In those situations I know I have to work the scene. That might mean manipulating the environment a bit in order to create a point of interest that will draw the viewer into the image.

— – —

more in: 10 Tips to Improve Your Winter Compositions
by Peter Baumgarten, Olympus Visionary
at Olympus

— – —

National Park Photography Expeditions

If you’re truly interested in landscape art photography, if you want to capture and create images that are at the next level, want to learn postproduction skills that render personal, interpretive work, then National Park Photography Expeditions (NPPE) is the workshop for you. Here you will learn the What, Why, and the all-important How of advancing a personal vision, extending your emotional range through composition, and how to use postproduction tools to bring your vision to life in a personal way.

We are landscape art photography teacher(s), and our role is to nurture your creative itch— that deep internal whisper that says I have something to say that is beyond taking a pretty picture. It’s that feeling that drives you to express yourself in ways that are meaningful, significant, and to create landscape images that are a ‘Vision beyond Documentation.’

— – —

Create, Learn, and Grow with Us
National Park Photography Expeditions
via outdoor photographer

— – —

Zion in Winter

Zion National Park, a magic oasis along the Virgin river is home to the largest sandstone cliffs on earth. While the park is most popular during the warm seasons it is still magical in winter, especially with new snowfall. Winter storms are always welcome here as they promise magical photo ops in their wake.

Explore the wonders of Zion Canyon, the Zion Plateau, and surrounding areas during the quiet and relaxed months of late winter.

— – —

Zion in Winter
more by Michael DeYoung at:
Arizona Highways PhotoScapes

— – —

See the most breathtaking national parks around the world

The United States may lay claim to the world’s first national park, but it’s far from the only country whose most prized lands are officially protected by the government.

After the establishment of Yellowstone in 1872, the national park concept took hold across America and beyond. Canada founded its first national parks in the 1880s; the idea eventually spread across the Atlantic to Great Britain after World War I, then later to its colonies. Japan and Mexico embraced the concept in the 1930s and dozens of other countries followed suit over the course of the 20th century.

Banff National Park, Canada
Photograph by Jenn Ackerman and Tim Gruber
— – —

Goreme National Park, Turkey
Photograph by Polina Nagareva
— – —

Torres del Paine National Park, Chile
Photograph by Michael Melford
— – —

Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia
Photograph by Robert Harding
— – —

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Australia
Photograph by Grant Faint
— – —

See the world’s most beautiful national parks
From ancient rock formations in Australia to towering glaciers in Patagonia, here are 20 of our favorite national parks.
By Erica Jackson Curran

more at National Geographic

— – —

A Year In The National Parks

For the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service, I had a dream assignment. I traveled to and photographed all 59 (at the time) of the U.S. national parks in one year on assignment for National Geographic. While other Nat Geo photographers were spending up to a year on assignment in a single national park, I was racing through them at breakneck speed. It was a whirlwind year flled with more beauty and nature than any one person should ever get to experience in such a short timeframe.

Sometimes during this project, I felt like it was completely unfair to take credit for any photos because it was truly nature that was doing all the heavy lifting.
— – —

Ten highlights from an epic tour photographing all of the U.S. national parks
Text & Photography Jonathan Irish

more in Outdoor Photographer

— – —

A Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite

There are few places in the world that are as beautiful and inspiring as Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. When it comes to iconic locations that define a country such as the United States, it is hard not think of images of Half Dome or Yosemite Falls, both of which have been made famous over the years by photographers such as Ansel Adams and Galen Rowell that each helped define photography for their respective generations.
by Colby Brown

— – —

A Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite
by Colby Brown
more at Alpha Universe