“Nature is paradisiacal, you could say, but it is in fact a jungle… it is one big struggle, one big fight”

Photographer Ruud van Empel was born in Breda, The Netherlands, in 1958. He studied at the St Joost Academy of Art, moving to Amsterdam in the late 1980s to work on his career as a visual artist. As one of the most pioneering and innovative contemporary digital photographers practising today, Ruud’s work is held in the collections of several major galleries and museums around the world and has been extensively exhibited.

“My idea was to construct a photograph that would look ordinary… but where everything was made up”
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Interview with Ruud van Empel
more in Digital Camera World – August 2019

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Every Rose has its Thorn

From Erdem to Prada, where Wednesday Addams was a muse, florals are going to the dark side this season, as fashion indulges in a beautiful, dark, twisted fantasy.

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Every Rose has its Thorn
Model: Darya at Chic Management.
Hair by Alan White at M.A.P; makeup by Nadine Monley at Talentland.
Photographer James Tolich is represented by B&A.

via Harper’s Bazaar Australia – September 2019

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Macro Art

This is a chance to capture the world of plants and gardens on a completely different scale, utilising a unique set of macro photography skills. From the life of tiny insects, to the mesmerising shapes and swirls of flowers, you are encouraged to explore our green planet close-up through macro photography, whilst showcasing the beauty and complexity of nature.

‘Panta Rhei’ by Lizzy Petereit
1st Place
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‘Big Nose’ by Richard Kubica
2nd Place
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‘Vitrail’ by Petar Sabol
3rd Place
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‘Glamourpillar’ by Henrik Spranz
Finalist
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‘Sunset Serenity’ by Henrik Spranz
Highly Commended
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Macro Art
more at International Garden Photographer of the Year

International Garden Photographer of the Year is the world’s premier competition and exhibition specialising in garden, plant, flower and botanical photography.
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Fill the Frame

To create visual impact fill the frame with your subject, excluding most or all of the background. Get in close, you do not have to have every part of the subject or object in the image for it to be complete. For this contest any subject or object in colour or black and white is acceptable. I look forward to seeing your images.

R e d by Lize Hill
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Owl by Luis Martins
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Flower by Paul kerby
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Moza wall by Gilbert Claes
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Orangutan by Steve James
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Fill the Frame

more at photocrowd

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Bokeh Galore

Bokeh can be defined as “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light”.

by Andrea Virág
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by Sean Scott
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by Veronika.Cervena
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by François Mahieu
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by Louis Benzell
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from “Bokeh Galore Challenge”
by Omar Bariffi

more at GuruShots

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Cherry Blossom in Colour

“I would like to see your photos of cherry blossom. You could show anything from a macro of a bud or single bloom, to branches or entire cherry blossom trees. Other things such as people can be shown in the image, but the cherry blossom must be dominant. All images must be in colour.”

Cherry blossom 2
by Borut Pihlar
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Cherry blossom
by Pamela Liu
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Sakura and anime-girls
by Yaroslava Gromova
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Ring-necked Parakeet
by Emma Durnford
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Cherry blossom in Virginia
by Jhafrix
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Cherry Blossom in Colour
Created and judged by Robert Snary
more at Photocrowd

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Perspective: a small thing that makes a big difference

It sounds cliché to say, “it’s all a matter of perspective”, but in photography a slight change in your camera’s position can make a big difference to the overall look of your final image. Let me take you on a recent expedition to a local field to show you what I mean.
by Peter Baumgarten, Olympus Visionary

The Formula
Well, there really isn’t one, except perhaps – move and shoot (or is that, shoot and move). Each scene is different, but your viewer will be far more engaged if you offer an unusual view of your subject. Some suggestions include;
Shoot higher than eye level
Shoot lower than eye level
Shoot straight up or straight down
Move in close or back away
Frame your subject – use a door, window, arch, tree branch (this is a whole blog post on its own)
Switch lenses or focal lengths (again another blog post)
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Perspective: a small thing that makes a big difference
more by Peter Baumgarten
at Olympus

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