Full-frame mirrorless vs. full-frame DSLR: what’s best?

Full-frame mirrorless vs. full-frame DSLR: what’s best?
Which is better, a traditional full-frame DSLR or the new mirrorless full-frame Canon EOS R System? We asked leading extreme sports photographer and Canon Ambassador Richard Walch for his Canon full-frame comparison.

Richard Walch is one of the world’s most experienced action photographers. He has been using Canon cameras professionally for more than 25 years. Best known for his snow sports and sailing images, Richard works in the most extreme environments on fast-moving shoots where failing to get the shot is not an option. That’s why he chooses the right camera for each job.

“Before I go on each job, I work out which is the perfect camera system for me to take,” he explains. “For full-frame DSLR, Canon has a huge range of bodies and lenses to choose from. I love the rugged quality and the great battery life.”
But Richard is at the top of his game because he is always looking for the edge to take his images to the next level. And right now, for some assignments, that edge is the new technology in the Canon EOS R System and its groundbreaking RF lenses.

“I depend on technology – I see it as supporting what I’m trying to do with my images. The Canon EOS R has definitely earned a place in my bag and is exciting to work with,” Richard says. “Once you get past just checking the spec sheets and start to use the camera, you realise it has features that can move your creativity forward.”

“For me the best images are spontaneous, and the EOS R gives you stunning full-frame quality in a package that’s super portable. But you can’t forget Canon has worked on the EOS DSLR range for 30 years. They are super reliable and built tough. So now I have a choice.”

So how does he choose? What’s the difference between full-frame DSLRs and the mirrorless full-frame EOS R System? From his expert perspective, what benefits does each offer, and when would he use one rather than the other?
— – —

Full-frame mirrorless vs. full-frame DSLR: what’s best?
more at canon

— – —

Find The Perfect Camera

What type of Camera Should i Get?

Here are some quick information about cameras you might be interested in:

DSLR : Digital single-lens reflex cameras are powerful digital cameras with a extensive adjustments for professional or photography enthusiasts. It combines the parts of a single-lens reflex camera (SLR) and a digital camera back, which replaces the photographic film. Features like live preview, HD videorecording with contrast detection autofocus or ergonomic integration like dedicated film speed (ISO) buttons took further advantage of the digital image sensor.

The Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera (MILC) is rather new and it is a very popular class of digital system cameras. Unlike a compact digital camera, a MILC is equipped with an interchangeable lens mount and unlike a DSLR, a MILC does not have a mirror-based optical viewfinder. This is for those who want more control over their photographs and still have a compact size camera.

A point-and-shoot camera, also called a compact digital camera, is made for those who wants to take images without all the manual adjustment. Most compact digital cameras use focus free lenses or autofocus for focusing, automatic systems for setting the exposure options, and have flash units built in. This camera is very easy to use and great for first time camera user, beginners and daily use.
— – —

Find The Perfect Camera
What type of Camera Should i Get?

via Optics Central
— – —

Fifty Years of Fujifilm Mirrorless Medium Format Cameras

Yep, 51 actually. Back in the 1960s, unlike all its rivals in the medium format camera market at the time, Fujifilm decided to concentrate on rangefinder designs rather than reflexes. And, of course, rangefinder cameras are mirrorless, right?

As has been the philosophy behind the GFX 50S and now the 50R, Fujifilm’s key objective back then was to combine “carrying ease” with “handling speed” hence the decision to package the 6x9cm format in a 35mm-style rangefinder body.

The Fujica G690 was launched in March 1968 at the Tokyo Camera Show and went on sale in the December of that year. It was compact for a 6x9cm format camera and had interchangeable lenses. An internal mask covered the film gate when lenses were being changed. It had a coupled rangefinder and the viewfinder also incorporated frame lines which not only adjusted for parallax as the lens was focused, but also the field-of-view. Even Leica didn’t offer this facility on its contemporary 35mm RF cameras. An updated version, the GL690 Professional, was launched in 1974 along with a 6x7cm camera called the GM670 Professional.

However, in 1978, Fujifilm decided to adopt a fixed-lens configuration which, along with a switch to GRP bodyshells, resulted in significant weight savings. The original GW690 and GW670 both had a 90mm f3.5 lens which was equivalent – in 35mm format terms – in focal length to a 35mm on the 6x9cm format and a 42mm on the 6x7cm. These models subsequently evolved through Series II (1985) and III (1992) versions and an ultrawide GSW version of the 6x9cm model was introduced in 1980. It had a 65mm f5.6 lens which was equivalent to a 25mm.

A line of 6×4.5cm format RF cameras was introduced in 1983 to enable even more compact and lightweight designs. While the early models were fully manual (but with built-in metering), in 1995, Fujifilm launched the next-generation GA645 Professional which caused almost as big a stir as the original X100 digital camera did in 2010. It pretty much went ‘all the way’ with automation – autofocus, program exposure control, motorised film transport and a built-in, pop-up flash – with styling similar to the 35mm compacts of the time. It was a medium format point-and shoot camera. The GA645 had a 60mm f4.0 lens, but a wider-angle version, called the GA645W (and also launched in 1995), was fitted with a 45mm f4.0 lens. Both were subsequently upgraded in 1997, and rebadged as the GA645i and GA645Wi respectively, with the main change being the addition of a second shutter release button on the front panel. In 1998, Fujifilm introduced the last-of-theline GA645Zi model which had a 55-90mm f4.5-6.9 zoom lens (equivalent to 35-55mm) and a modernised body with a more pronounced handgrip.

Given this track record, don’t rule out a digital medium format X100-style camera (i.e. with a fixed lens) from Fujifilm sometime in the future.
— – —

report by Paul Burrows
in Australian Camera

— – —

Le Canon EOS R et son 24-105 selon Chasseur d’Images

Canon lance un nouvel appareil photo plein format et une série d’objectifs qui constituent les bases du nouveau système EOS R. Ce lancement marque l’arrivée d’une gamme de nouveaux équipements plein format. Doté de l’autofocus le plus rapide au monde et premier appareil photo ayant la capacité de faire la mise au point en conditions d’éclairage aussi faibles que celles correspondant à l’indice de luminosité IL -6.

— – —

Le Canon EOS R et son 24-105 selon Chasseur d’Images
à voir dans Chasseur d’Images 407

Le Nikon Z7 et son 24-70 selon Chasseur d’Images

Plus qu’un appareil photo sans miroir. Un appareil photo Nikon sans miroir.
Nous avons toujours eu la vision de créer des appareils photo et des objectifs qui capturent plus de lumière. Plus de lumière signifie plus de détails. Plus de vitesse. Plus de possibilités. Le Z 7 concrétise cette vision (et plus encore). Combinant les avantages d’une conception sans miroir légère, une toute nouvelle monture plein cadre révolutionnaire et des objectifs assortis, un capteur d’image de 45,7 mégapixels conçu par Nikon et une intégration facile avec le système DSLR de Nikon, incluant les objectifs NIKKOR que vous aimez, le Z 7 est un appareil photo comme aucun autre auparavant. Et pourtant, il s’agit bel et bien d’un Nikon. C’est un appareil photo sans miroir réinventé.

— – —

Le Nikon Z7 et son 24-70 selon Chasseur d’Images
à voir dans Chasseur d’Images 407

Perfect for a fashionista – The Louis Vuitton edition Nikon Z7 camera

Collaborations have always been in vogue. Be it cars, real estate, mobile phones, and even digital cameras, fashion brands are always keen to lend their name and styling expertise to companies. Hermes has been collaborating with Leica for a while now, so why not others?

How about Louis Vuitton partnering with Nikon? While there is no official word yet a photo has propped up on the Nikon Rumours website that shows the Z7 dressed up in Louis Vuitton. The top of the camera looks to be in covered in real gold and the rest of it covered it in the LV insignia. Could this be Nikon taking the high road to luxury or it is just the imagination of a photoshopper? We will know soon. Whatever it may be, it does look good.

— – —

Perfect for a fashionista – The Louis Vuitton edition Nikon Z7 camera
via Luxury Launches

Changer…

Votre appareil est trop lourd? trop lent? en panne? dépassé? Le changement, c’est maintenant! Pour vous aider à faire votre choix, la rédac’ a composé un guide d’un genre particulier, puisque les appareils y sont rangés en fonction de vos attentes.
Changer pour plus de légèreté
Changer pour plus de réactivité
Changer pour plus de pixels
Changer pour des valeurs sûres
Je ne change pas, je débute
Changer pour un appareil qui fait tout
Changer pour un compact
Changer pour photographier autrement
Changer pour la vidéo

Changer
Pourquoi et Comment
60 meilleurs appareils passés au peigne fin
à voir dans Chasseur d’Images