Fall in love with heart-shaped places around the world

Some people leave their hearts in San Francisco, others consider Paris—the “City of Love”—as the epicenter of romance. But these heart-shaped attractions, whether naturally occurring or crafted by hand, visibly channel the affectionate Valentine’s symbol. From a flight over Heart Reef in Australia to floral arbors resembling you-know-whats in Dubai, these spots could inspire passion, platonic love, or at least some heart-worthy Instagram photos.

Upper Antelope Canyon, Arizona
Hike through the Upper Antelope Canyon, near Page, Arizona, to find a heart, which eons of erosion have carved into the red stone. You’ll need a Navajo guide to visit the Upper and Lower Antelope canyons, located in Navajo Nation—a 27,000-square-mile area in northeastern Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico. Check out these eight epic stops in the Four Corners region.
Photograph by Justin Collins
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Hokkaido, Japan
Amid the natural wonders of this island in Japan’s, Lake Toyoni is a naturally formed freshwater lake in the southeastern part of Tomakomai city. Spot it from above via the Sarudake Mountain Path near Tomakomai.
Photograph by Satoru Kobayashi
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Easter Egg Rock Island, Maine
An Atlantic Puffin perches on a heart-shaped rock on Easter Egg Rock Island, Maine. The seven-acre, treeless island is one of the world’s first restored Atlantic puffin colonies, initiated in 1973.
Photograph by Melissa Groo
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Špičnik, Slovenia
Sample some of Slovenia’s best wine in Špičnik, a small town famous for its winding, heart-shaped road. The best view can be seen from the top of Dreisiebner Štefka farm.
Photograph by Mario Horvat
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Heart Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia
You’ll have to book a helicopter or seaplane to see Great Barrier Island’s Heart Reef—a coral “bommie” or outcropping that’s just 56 feet long—since the area is off limits to snorkelers and divers due to its protected status.
Photograph by Dukas Presseagentur
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Fall in love with heart-shaped places around the world
more at National Geographic

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Around the World in 80 Dishes

There’s no denying that food and travel go hand in hand. One of the most exciting things about going abroad is experiencing exotic flavours and indulging in different foods that we’re not used to sampling back home. Today, many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy our favourite cuisines in our homelands, thanks to an abundance of international restaurants; but an increase in international food stores, as well as more global ingredients appearing in regular supermarkets, means it’s easier than ever before to re-create these much-loved meals from the comfort of our own kitchens. There’s nothing quite like serving up an aesthetically pleasing masterpiece and knowing you’re responsible for its heavenly aromas and rich flavours. Around The World In 80 Dishes is the ultimate companion for any foodie – a collection of the most mouth-watering recipes from every corner of the globe, including fascinating insights into their origins. The most difficult problem you’ll face will be deciding what to cook next!

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Around the World in 80 Dishes
via my favourite magazines

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Top 25 Photos on Flickr in 2019

The year is wrapping up, which means it’s time to highlight some of the most popular, interesting, and engaging photographs uploaded to Flickr in 2019. Ready for some inspiration?

To compile this top 25 list, we started with an algorithm that took into account several engagement metrics, like how many times the photo was viewed, faved, or commented. The selection also involved curation by Flickr staff.

Most of the top photos come from long-term community members, professional and self-taught photographers from different countries around the world with an eye for people, nature, and beautiful landscapes.

Mother Nature by Lizzy Gadd (Canada) with a Sony ILCE-7RM3
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Kiss The Paws by Audrey Bellot (France) with a NIKON D500
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Pure Magic by Alex Noriega (USA)
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Balance by Jessica Drossin (USA) with a Canon EOS 5DS R
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Snowy owl – Harfang des neiges – Bubo scandiacus by Maxime Legare-Vezina (Canada)
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Top 25 Photos on Flickr in 2019 From Around The World
more at Flickr

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Toilets Around the World

Es ist wirklich faszinierend, wie unterschiedlich das stille Örtchen interpretiert werden kann. Von einem süßen, kleinen Holzhäuschen vor einer himmlischen Winterkulisse, bis hin zum völlig abstrakten Kunstwerk, das von einer Toilette nichts ahnen lässt, ist in diesem Kalender alles enthalten. Dieser Kalender ist garantiert kein “Griff ins Klo”. Wenn Sie auf der Suche sind nach einem besonderen Kalender, der von allem etwas bietet, Extravaganz, Natur, Landschaft, Architektur und vielem mehr, dann ist dieser Kalender genau das Richtige für Sie!

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Toilets Around the World
more at Teneues-calendars

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For anyone struggling to see more than just what’s in front of them

Around the World in Cut-Outs
Globe-hopping artist Paperboyo transforms real iconic landmarks and settings around the world into works of art and amusement by just holding up a cut-out and snapping a photo. Here is New York’s Guggenheim Museum as a flowerpot, the Eiffel Tower sporting butterfly wings, a giant octopus peeking its tentacles out of the Roman Colosseum, and nearly a hundred more images of wonder and humor. Organized into categories such as Quirky Architecture, Pop Culture, and Playing with Food, the book also covers Paperboyo’s process with these topics:
• Behind the Scenes
• The Fails
• D.I.Y.

Featuring favorites from his wildly popular Instagram feed plus many never-before-seen delights, entertaining captions, behind-the-scenes, and cut-outs for readers to make their own images, Around the World in Cut-outs encourages a different and delightful view of the world around us.
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Around the World in Cut-Outs

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Photography Magazine

Chiiz is first of its kind publication devoted to descriptive Photography. Drawing on the requirements of a photo enthusiast, Chiiz features photographers and their unique and incisive stories from across the globe.

The World’s Best Photo Contests
20 new photography contests every month; judged by world-renowned professional photographers, and sponsored by top brands. Share your best pictures online. Inspire others and be inspired.

Vision
At Chiiz, the pursuit of ideas is a passion to us. Ideas that are rooted in reality. Ideas that are born out of workday situations. Ideas that lend a fourth dimension to business situations. Ideas that work. Our aim is to continually come up with winning ideas in web designing and web development for our customers, without losing sight of changing technology and industry scenario. To set new standards in online communication and services is our strength. To usher our customers into an age, is our vision for the future where the thin line between real world personal contact and online connectivity and digital convenience will disappear.

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more at chiiz

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See the most breathtaking national parks around the world

The United States may lay claim to the world’s first national park, but it’s far from the only country whose most prized lands are officially protected by the government.

After the establishment of Yellowstone in 1872, the national park concept took hold across America and beyond. Canada founded its first national parks in the 1880s; the idea eventually spread across the Atlantic to Great Britain after World War I, then later to its colonies. Japan and Mexico embraced the concept in the 1930s and dozens of other countries followed suit over the course of the 20th century.

Banff National Park, Canada
Photograph by Jenn Ackerman and Tim Gruber
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Goreme National Park, Turkey
Photograph by Polina Nagareva
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Torres del Paine National Park, Chile
Photograph by Michael Melford
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Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia
Photograph by Robert Harding
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Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Australia
Photograph by Grant Faint
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See the world’s most beautiful national parks
From ancient rock formations in Australia to towering glaciers in Patagonia, here are 20 of our favorite national parks.
By Erica Jackson Curran

more at National Geographic

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