Meet Zoë Kravitz: Allure’s June 2017 Cover Star

Zoë Kravitz photographed by Patrick Demarchelier
“People always assume I’m much more hippie-dippy than I am.”

Beyond the famous pedigree, the formidable Ms. Kravitz is poised for single-name stardom.

…It would be journalistic negligence to do an interview with Zoë Kravitz without bringing up her style, which is so admired and emulated. We start with the hair: “The platinum’s fun. It’s work. But it’s something I’ve always wanted to do. I’ll stick with it as long as I can.” She laughs at the thought that her aesthetic may not outlast her patience or lack thereof. Her fashion sense seems less of a problem in that department and is firmly rooted in common sense, for all its bohemian overtones. “I’ve always liked contrasts, contradiction,” she says of her fashion tastes. “I think too much of anything doesn’t work — like if everything you wear is expensive-looking, you look stale. And if everything you wear is ripped and falling apart, you look crazy.” (Every fashion blogger in the world, please, oh please, take note.) “I like when you can find a balance. I live in New York City. I walk around. I have to be comfortable. You don’t look cool or sexy if you’re uncomfortable; it’s not attractive.”

more at Allure

David Bowie | Style File Gallery

David Bowie is unarguably fashion’s king of self-invention. Mod teenager, hippy with dishevelled curls, Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, Thin White Duke – Bowie changed his style more dramatically than any other musician in history. His transformations brought about seismic cultural shifts, changing the definition of what it meant to be a popular rock star. For Bowie clothes were a way of projecting self-expression, a powerful tool in communicating individuality at its most extreme, glittering and creative.

David Bowie | Style File Gallery
more at: vogue

Street Style Photography Tips | by Tommy Ton

Quick & Composed: Even though this was snapped very quickly, everything about this image is well composed—the hands in his pockets with a bracelet showing, tattoo sleeves playing off the Hawaiian print, and the vest and chain in between to keep contrast.

Lighting: The pink tint on her garment is caused by a nearby balloon, which acts as a makeshift color gel in the sunlight. It is a nice surprise that gives this image an extra touch.

Background: Colored backgrounds can either make an image more interesting or make it look too crowded. In this case, the red goes very well with her blue. No colored seamless needed.

Be the director: Duo shots where two people are synchronized and their outfits play off each other can give the singular image a little backstory.

The subject is usually the one that is moving—but in this case, it is the traffic in the background that is in motion. By continuous capturing, you are able to have different background options as your subject stays still.

Sometimes one accessory can be in the way of another, or physical gestures can look rather awkward. By closely following one subject, you ensure that you capture them in the most perfectly composed way.

Background: When a subject wears strong and vibrant colors, it is good to create negative space by capturing the image against a neutral backdrop. This allows viewers to focus on the garments’ details.

Depth of field: Shooting this image at f/5.6 assures that the background is blurry but maintains its overall texture. It plays on the green bush in the background that invokes the sea and shark print on her shirt.

Background: I just love how she stands out among the people in the background, who are wearing monochrome or solid colored outfits. It definitely makes her get noticed more than she already does.

Speed: A high shutter speed allows me to capture the movement of silky, flowing garments like this one.

Focus & Depth of Field: The details on her belt and necklace stand out—and shot at f/5.6, the background does not compete for attention.

Lighting: Bright garments look outstanding in daylight—I like how all of the colors just pop in this image, whether they are in the foreground or background.

Background/Speed: Finding a solid background with no distractions is one of the keys to capturing the look you want. It’s important to keep snapping as your subject walks in order to secure him or her with a solid background in at least one of the frames.

Be the director: Each accessory combined with the outfit makes the image more interesting. I always wait for them to play off of each other—it compiles the perfect capture.

Zoom: A 18-200mm lens allows the flexibility to focus on details or capture the whole look.

Lighting: The shadows in this image make the subjects more dramatic and engrossing.

When accessories come together they make the image engaging. Each piece drives the viewer’s eye from one to the other.

Background: I like to play with the objects in the background to coordinate with the details on each subject’s outfit.

Speed: The continuous shooting feature means I can capture subjects who are walking quickly, so I always grab the perfect moment.

Angles: I try to photograph my subjects from many different angles to find the best way to showcase their accessories.

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