An “otherworldly” misty sunrise wins South Downs National Park’s annual photo competition

Thank you to everyone who took part in the 2019/2020 South Downs Photo Competition.
In total, more than 2800 people took part in the People’s Choice vote; the winner of which will be announced later in February.
Below is a collection of the winning and shortlisted images from the Photo Competition.

Winner of the 2019/20 South Downs Photo Competition: Into the Mistic by Andrew Gambling
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Winner of the ‘Wildlife’ category in the 2019/20 South Downs Photo Competition: Hare in wildflower margin by Adam Huttly
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Runner-up in the 2019/20 South Downs Photo Competition: Stedham Common Sunrise by Mark Couper
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Highly-commended in the 2019/20 South Downs Photo Competition: Pony heaven by Joe James
and People’s Choice Award
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more at South Downs

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Stunning drone images by Abstract Aerial Art

Why use your drone to scout out great aerial shots when you can use satellite imagery of the entire the world? That’s the winning strategy of artists J.P. and Mike Andrews, two U.K.-born brothers known for their incredible abstract aerial images. They’re some of the world’s best drone photographers, but they spend way more time researching potential drone photography locations online than they do flying drones, with amazing results.

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Stunning drone images by Abstract Aerial Art
Images by J.P. and Mike Andrews

more at Professional Photographer Magazine

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Life on the edge

Inside the world’s largest STONE forest, where tropical rain has eroded rocks into 300ft razor-sharp spikes

Isolated and inhospitable, this huge collection of razor-sharp vertical rocks looks like the last place where wildlife would thrive.

The colossal ‘Grand Tsingy’ landscape in western Madagascar is the world’s largest stone forest, where high spiked towers of eroded limestone tower over the greenery.

But despite its cold, dangerous appearance, the labyrinth of 300ft stones is home to a number of animal species, including 11 types of lemur.

Its name, ‘Tsingy’ translates as ‘where one cannot walk’, due to the hazardous formations of razor-sharp pinnacles made from limestone which have been eroded by tropical rain.

Explorer and photographer Stephen Alvarez captured the beauty of the Grand Tsingy when he went there as part of an expedition for National Geographic.
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Life on the edge
more at dailymail

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The Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year 2020

The Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year 2020 competition will run from December 2019 to May 2020. Entries – of African wildlife, landscapes, and culture – can be submitted up to midnight (CAT) on Thursday, 30 April 2020, after which they will close and the winners will be announced end of May 2020.

Back-lit baby vervet monkey. Kruger National Park, South Africa by Gareth Thomas
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A ring-tailed lemur suns herself while her baby keeps a firm hold on her back. Berenty Reserve, Madagascar by Beverly Houwing
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A young baboon quenches his thirst at a waterhole. Indlovu River Lodge Private Game Reserve, South Africa by Braeme Holland
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A sleepy cheetah cub. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania by Diego Occhi
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An orange-breasted sunbird in search of the sweet nectar from a common pagoda. Taken Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, Cape Town, South Africa by Braeme Holland
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The ‘Weekly Selection’ will be the top entries submitted via the AG website and Instagram. This selection will be published at the end of each week on our weekly online magazine as a gallery and in an album on Facebook;
• During the month of May 2020, once the submission deadline has come and gone, the judges will judge all accumulated entries from the Weekly Selections, gradually reducing the number of qualifiers to a list of ‘Finalists’, from which the winners will be selected and announced in June 2020
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The Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year 2020

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Women Portraits by Georgy Chernyadyev | Георгий Чернядьев

Разница между хорошим и средним снимком — это вопрос нескольких миллиметров, очень маленькая разница. Но существенная. Я думаю, что между фотографами нет большой разницы, зато очень важны разницы маленькие. Анри Картье-Брессон (Henri Cartier-Bresson), фотограф

Очень приятно, что посетили мой сайт!!! Я более 3 лет занимаюсь фотографией, слежу за последними тенденциями в фото-индустрии и в обработке фотографий, что позволяет делать качественные и красивые фотографии.
Открыт для коммерческих и творческих предложений.
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Women Portraits by Georgy Chernyadyev | Георгий Чернядьев
more at 35photo

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Does Camera Sensor Size Matter?

How to evaluate the advantages of full-frame versus smaller sensors when choosing a camera
Text & Photography by Josh Miller

Does camera sensor size really matter anymore? As photographers, we have never had so many great camera options that will produce amazing images. There are very capable cameras sporting everything from Micro Four Thirds sensors to APS-C, full-frame and all the way up to massive medium-format sensors. …

… Having shot with everything from Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras to Fujifilm and Sony APS-C to Nikon full-frame DSLRs, and most recently with Nikon Z mirrorless, I can honestly say all three sensor formats will meet the needs of nearly all photographers. Having been a Nikon shooter for more than 20 years, I’m most familiar with that system, but over the last few years, I have owned or used all the other systems extensively in an effort to reduce my weight and also see where the future lies. In my experience with current cameras in these various formats, any camera with at least 20-megapixel resolution will make great prints up to 20×30-inches or larger, assuming you are shooting at reasonable ISOs with quality lenses and good technique. …

… So how do you decide? With all the sensor formats being so good, I wouldn’t actually make sensor size my No. 1 determining factor when choosing to invest in a system. I would decide how good is good enough in terms of image quality and then look more broadly at the lenses and accessories being offered with the system. …
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Does Camera Sensor Size Matter?
by Josh Miller

more at Outdoor Photographer

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Mountain Photography Masterpieces

Ever since humankind could stand, there has been a desire to conquer mountains. Their sheer majesty, not to mention their individual characters and microclimates, provide endless fodder for the adventurous photographer. Here are some superb mountainscapes to get your creative juices flowing.

Mount Trump by Torsten Richertz
Sony A7R, FE 16-35mm F4 ZA OSS at 33mm, 20 seconds at f/11, ISO 100
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Stormy Patagonia by MayMah
Nikon D800E, 30mm, 1/15sec at f/11, ISO 200
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First light by Christine Jacobson
Nikon D750, 24-70mm f/2.8 at 65mm, 30 seconds at f/22, ISO 100
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Karst sunrise by Cedar K
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, TS-E24mm f/3.5L II, 1/60sec at f/10, ISO 100
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El Capitan, Yosemite National Park by Dzung Tran
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Mountain Photography Masterpieces
more at photocrowd

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