A decade of award-winning British landscape photography

A new book brings together the UK’s greatest landscape photographers, who have captured everything from violent seas to tranquil mountains.

Featuring more than 250 beautiful images from a hugely popular series that has sold more than 100,000 copies, this celebratory special edition will grace any coffee table. Supported by VisitBritain and Network Rail, the Landscape Photographer of the Year competition was launched Charlie Waite, one of today’s best-known landscape photographers, in 2006. The Special Edition looks back at the panels of respected judges, all big names in the photography field, that have helped him to choose winners of the sought after accolade ‘Landscape Photographer of the Year’ over the last decade.

Printed on sumptuous art paper, this special edition features everything the British landscape is renowned for – classic shots of rural countryside, rugged lochs, mountains and moorland and stark industrial scenes capturing the beauty and diversity of Britain in the 21st century. Landscape Photographer of the Year: 10 Year Special Edition is a glorious celebration of a much-loved competition and an object of desire for everyone with an interest in photography as well as those who love the British countryside.

Old Man in the Trees, Kelly Hall Tarn, Cumbria, by Chris Shepherd
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Danny MacAskill on The Inaccessible Pinnacle, Isle of Skye, Scotland, by Chris Prescott
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Mist and Reflections, Crummock Water, Cumbria, England, by Tony Bennett
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Starlings over Carmarthen, Southwest Wales, by Nigel McCall
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Ghost of Rannoch Moor, Scotland, by David Breen
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Comedy Carpet, Blackpool, Lancashire, England, by Gary Telford
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Landscape Photographer of the Year: 10 Year (Hardback)
Charlie Waite (author), AA Publishing (author)

via the guardian

International Garden Photographer of the Year

International Garden Photographer of the Year is the world’s premier competition and exhibition specialising in garden, plant, flower and botanical photography.

Purple Swirl by Jackie Kramer
Finalist – Macro Art
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Red Ribbons by Linde Stewart
Finalist – Macro Art
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Standing Alone by Yi Fan
2nd place – Wildflower Landscapes
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Marbled White Butterfly by Ross Hoddinott
1st place – Wildlife in the Garden
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Noir Flohay by Bart Heirweg
2nd place – Trees, Woods & Forests
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All Together by Mauro Tronto
2nd place – Breathing Spaces
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The Miao Terraces by Mingli Tian
3rd place – Bountiful Earth
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Congratulations to everyone who won this year and thank you to everyone who took part in our 10th Anniversary competition.

more finalists and winners at igpoty

The Circle of Life | Chris Schmid

Award-winning nature photographer captures stunning imagery of African wildlife; depicting the harsh realities of survival in the wild.

Photographer Chris Schmid set out on an awe-inspiring photography expedition to the dry salt planes of Namibia.

The shoot was part of Chris’ documentary ‘The African Survivors’; filming and photographing endangered species across Africa; looking at how the same animals behaved differently in differently environments.

The enigmatic beauty of the wild is enriched through the lens of Sony’s RX10 III camera; combining an extended 24-600mm 25x super-telephoto zoom with a powerful sensor poised to capture sensational close-up detail.

Award winning photographer Chris Schmid, commented: “I find photographing the local nature in Namibia fascinating; seeing how the animals have adapted their behaviour to be able to survive is a wonderful story to tell through the camera lens. Vegetation and water supplies are a lot more limited in such dry environments, we see that groups of animals split up more often when hunting for their next food source. With precious few places to hide, this makes the territory extremely effective and deadly.”

The Circle of Life
more at Sony

Aztec Dancer

An Aztec Dancer, in full ceremonial costume, is absolutely awe-inspiring. Photographing one of these figures is an unforgettable experience.

The dance that could not be suppressed
The Spanish conquistadors attempted to destroy as much pre-hispanic culture as they could but, try as they might, they could not suppress the powerful Aztec Mitote dance. The dance, dubbed the Conchero dance by the Spanish, has strong ties with military conflict. Aztec princes and lords, dressed in their finery, would perform the dance to relate stories of great battles past. The stories continue to this day, passed down from generation to generation. This lineage system has protected the dance’s sacred heritage and cultural significance.

Based near Puerto Vallarta, a major outpost of the former Aztec Empire. We have established strong ties with the local Conchero community. It is these ties which enabled us to develop an unforgettable photographic and cultural experience. Our Aztec 1-on-1 Workshop.

Aztec Dancer Photography Workshop
more at JP Stones Photography

JP Stones Photography Workshops has as its primary goal to bring together, in a 1-on-1 tuition environment, photographers with the fascinating culture and folkloric figures of Mexico and South America.
We are based on Mexico’s Pacific Coast but owned by a British (JP Stones) and Australian (Brei Barron) couple with over 25 years of Photography and Event Management Experience.

Jean-Luc Grossmann | Burning Man

Burning Man is my first project under the name “PlanetVisible”, a side collaboration with two Zurich based photographer friends, Justin Hession and Pascal Richard. When deciding on a project we wanted something that was cultural, spiritual, unreal, uncommon as well as visual with a strong storytelling opportunity. We wanted something to discover and explore, but most importantly it needed to be something we were free to uncover as individuals. We wanted a project that gave the possibility of working on the same theme but interpreting it with our own self-expression, then seeing how these three viewpoints came together as one.

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Burning Man
Interview with Jean-Luc Grossmann

more in Adore Noir Magazine

How Filters Work

UV, Circular Polarizer, Neutral Density, Infrared, Black & White and more…

UV filter (before)

UV filter (after)

Ultraviolet or “UV” filters block some UV light from entering the camera lens. In outdoor photographs UV light increase the effect of atmospheric haze making distant subjects, such as mountains, in scenic photos less sharp. Be removing some of the UV light it reduces some atmospheric haze yielding clearer scenic photos.

Most people also us UV filters to protect their lens. Lenses can be expensive and so can repairing them if they get damaged. These filters provide an excellent first line of defense for the front element of the lens. High-quality UV filters can remain on the lens at all times as they have no effect on indoor photos and do not reduce the amount of visible light entering the lens.

UV filter (before)

UV filter (after)

A UV filter has glass that is specially formulated to absorb UV light at a certain wavelength and lower.

UV light that is not blocked by the earth’s atmosphere has wavelengths beginning at 315nm and going up to the visible violet light at the 400nm upper end of the visible spectrum. This light is commonly known as UV-A and not only is it bad for your eyes its bad for your photography. The visible light spectrum runs between 400mn violet and 700nm red. Even though UV light cannon be seen by the human eye it can have a negative impact on photos.
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Circular Polarizer filter (before)

Circular Polarizer filter (after)

When you here the word “Polarized” many negative things come to mind, well it’s the same in photography polarized light is something you don’t want and a Hoya Circular Polarizer filter can improve your photography.

Circular Polarizer filter (before)

Circular Polarizer filter (after)

Circular polarizing filters allow photographers to achieve creative, in-camera, effects not possible after the image is created. A polarizing filter simply filters out unwanted reflections from non-metallic surfaces such as water and glass in addition to light reflecting off moisture and pollution in the atmosphere. By rotating the filter you can select just the right amount of filtration needed to achieve the creative effect. This results in bluer skies, greener leaves, reduced or eliminated reflections, and greater clarity in your final image.

Circular Polarizer filter (before)

Circular Polarizer filter (after)

Polarized light is light who’s rays have been scattered due to pollution, moisture in the atmosphere and reflection. A circular polarizer filter only allows light rays that are traveling in one direction to enter the lens. This is how the Circular polarizer works it’s magic.
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Wonder how photographers get flowing water to look like a stream of fog? They use a strong Neutral Density (ND for short). The easiest explanation for what an ND filter does is reduce the amount of light entering your camera by set amounts. ND filters are dark with no color to them at all, hence the “Neutral” name.

Neutral Density filter (before)

Neutral Density filter (after)

The filter can be used in a variety of situations to create effects that are simply not possible to get any other way.

The best way to get these dreamy blurred motion effects is to use a strong neutral density filter like the Hoya SOLAS IRND 3.0. This dark filter reduces the amount of light entering the lens by a full 10 stops. In real world terms that means if on a sunny day the camera shows an exposure of 1/250 of a second shutter speed and an F/8 aperture, the IRND 3.0 will reduce the shutter speed 10 stops so with the same F/8 aperture the shutter speed would be 2 full seconds!

In darker situations, such as a stream in a forest on a cloudy day, shutter speeds as slow as 30 seconds can be obtained!

Neutral Density filter (before)

Neutral Density filter (after)

Always use a tripod when using strong ND filters to get long exposures so only the motion is blurred, not the things that are not moving!

Some will say that you can always stop down to a very small aperture such as F/16 or F/22 but keep in mind that most lenses will not be as sharp due to refraction issues at these small apertures. So unless you need the depth of field for an effect, apertures smaller than F/11 are not recommended for most lenses.
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Infrared, Exploring the World Beyond Visible Light

Infrared filter (before)

Infrared filter (after)

Ever wonder how to get those otherworldly effects where leaves are white in black & white photos instead of gray? An Infrared filter is the key. These filters are specifically designed to block visible light and only allow infrared light to pass through into the lens and camera.

Infrared filter (before)

Infrared filter (after)

Infrared photography yields very interesting, sometimes stunning, and creative results as objects in a scene can reflect infrared light very differently than normal light. A prime example is foliage. Leaves reflect a good mount of visible light but they reflect even more infrared light which is why they appear brighter in color infrared or while in black & white.
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How Filters Work
more at Hoya