7 Things to know about photographing food

7 Things to know about photographing food by Olympus designer and professional photographer Ted Colegrove

I’ve always loved food and photography, so as a photographer, the marriage of the two has been very creatively satisfying. My style of food photography is close to a journalistic approach. I don’t spend hours dressing up my food with the perfect lighting and plating. I take photos of how the food was served, in the place it was served, as I’m about to eat it.

— – —

7 Things to know about photographing food
continue at Olympus

Advertisements

Wear Good Shoes: Inspiring Advice from Magnum Photographers

Download this free 60-page PDF from Magnum Photos—filled with excellent tips, advice and words of wisdom from the photographers at Magnum, as well as many of their iconic images. A great resource for anyone who wants to make better pictures.

— – —

Free guide from Magnum Photos
get it at Lens Culture

Eyes On The World

Travel photography tips for documenting places and cultures
Text & Photography by Mark Edward Harris

Experiencing cultures and getting access to people and locations are key components of successful travel photography. From assignments that have given me the opportunity to explore 95 countries on six continents, I have developed a working methodology that helps me bridge cultural gaps and maneuver through unfamiliar territory. These are my top travel photography tips gained from decades of experience.

— – —

Eyes On The World
continue at Outdoor Photographer

“Golden and blue hours are almost always the best times to shoot a landscape image.”

We’ve all seen landscape shots that just nail it – the perfect mix of light, composition and subject matter rolled into one. But how do you get it to all come together? New Zealand photographer Rach Stewart shares eight ways you can take better landscape images, now.

Think about your focal point; the rule of thirds is popular for a reason; have a foregroung; think about the time of day; understand colour; gear: using a tripod and filters to capture movement; know your histogram; the weather…
from “8 Tips for Better Landscapes”

more in Australian Photography – July 2017

Travel Photography: Tips and Tricks for High Contrast Scenes

Tips and tricks for high contrast scenes by Dietmar Temps

It’s summer, time for travelling and also peak season for nature and travel photography. Digital cameras are still getting better and better and easier to use. However, sometimes it is quite disappointing that a picture such as a historic city alley either is partly underexposed with huge dark shadow areas, or the roofs and the sky are extremely overexposed. Although it is possible to review the image immediately in the display on the camera, the problem can often only be addressed at home in the post-processing workflow, and then it might be too late to fix the image in order to get a beautiful photograph.

Experienced photographers can handle dynamic ranges of 10 to 11 EV

Many travel and landscape photography pictures have very high contrast. “Dynamic range” is the term for the range of light intensity from the darkest shadows to the brightest highlights and it is measured in “exposure values” (EV), also commonly called “stops”. Our eyes are able to adapt to see high contrast scenes but the dynamic range of the sensor of a digital camera is limited. Unfortunately the dynamic range of monitors, photographic paper or print is even more limited. A dynamic range of an image of about 8 to 9 EV is usually no problem. Experienced photographers can handle dynamic ranges of 10 to 11 EV quite well with exact exposure settings and with the help of calibrated monitors. But what about high contrast scenes with a dynamic range of 14 EV and higher? In particular landscape photography offers a wide range of high contrast scenes: idyllic sunsets by the seaside, backlit photography or scenes in high mountain regions.

An important rule in photography is to avoid high contrast in the first place. Many professional landscape photographers shoot only early in the morning or between late afternoon and evening because the light is much softer. Long shadows can be avoided when the sun is at the back of the photographer. Foreground subjects in backlit photography should be placed in front of a dark background because the high contrast can only be recognized as a small light fringe around the foreground subject. Long shadows might be wonderful for creative photography, but the final picture should offer enough details in dark shadow areas as well. The dynamic range of a scene can be simply reviewed with the help of the brightness histogram on the rear screen of the camera or manually calculated with contrast measurement. If the dynamic range of a scene or subject exceeds 10 or 11 EV the photographer should probably try out one of the following approaches.

Travel Photography: Tips and Tricks for High Contrast Scenes
continue at Datacolor

5 Landscape Photography Tips for Mountain Travelers

You don’t have to be a professional photographer with an expensive camera body to take great landscape photos while on vacation. Follow these five tips and take your next landscape photos from good to great!

— – —

more Mountain Photography in:
Lens Magazine
#31 – April 2017

Backyard Photography is for the Birds

Backyard Photography is for the Birds
by Olympus Trailblazer Peter Baumgarten

— – —

Bird photography can be exhilarating. However, it presents a number of hurdles to overcome – travel, time, skill level, and cost. Get tips from Olympus Trailblazer Peter Baumgarten that will help you capture some great bird images, all while remaining within quick reach of a fresh cup of coffee.

Read the tips at Olympus