Photographing Dragonflies And Damselflies

Have a look at this collection of Dragonfly and Damselfly imagery, plus pick up some tips on capturing images of these insects.
Head to ponds, lakes and rivers and chances are, you’ll soon spot Damselflies and Dragonflies which make interesting subjects for a macro image. If you do want to have a go at capturing these flying insects in your shots ideally, you’ll need a macro lens but a longer zoom with a macro function at the longer end will also work fine, especially when coupled with extension tubes. Approach slowly, and start taking pictures from a distance so if they do fly off, at least you’ve got a few images saved to your memory card. It can be easier to capture images of these insects from a higher angle, looking down on the subject but do try shooting side-on, too.

DavidPritchard08a DavidPritchard08b DavidPritchard08c DavidPritchard08dPhotographing Dragonflies And Damselflies
by David Pritchard

more at ephotozine

10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography

10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography
by Mike Boening, Olympus Trailblazer

MikeBoening02aStreet photography is one of the most exciting forms of photography because all you need to do is go for a “walk.” Actually, it may not be a simple as that but documenting everyday life can get easier as you explore and practice this exciting genre of photography. Capturing that decisive moment when an image becomes more than just a snapshot can happen by following a few tips.

MikeBoening02b1- Check your settings
Street photography is not always technical in nature.
At its roots it’s about emotion and the mood of an image. But, no matter what, you still have to know your camera settings. Understanding your camera is a big key into forgetting about it, so you can focus on the composition of the image. I try to shoot most of my street photography in “P” Mode setting my ISO on Auto with its high end being 6400. When I do this I am letting the camera think for me, while I think about the scene in the viewfinder. Now, I modify this on occasions like night shooting or if I am intentionally trying to create blur in my images, but I select the “P” Mode because it lets me focus on the emotion, which is the most important part of my creative process.

MikeBoening02c10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography
by Mike Boening, Olympus Trailblazer

MikeBoening02dcontinue at: getolympus

MikeBoening02e

Get Low, Get Close, Get In Your Face! | Do More With Wide-Angle

Do More With Wide-Angle
Master of Dreamscapes Ian Plant shows his top-five tips for great wide-angle photography

IanPlant11a IanPlant11b IanPlant11c IanPlant11d IanPlant11e— – —

Landscape photography just wouldn’t be the same without wide-angle lenses. Superbly suited for the classic « near-far » style of composition (a staple for most landscape shooters), wide-angle lenses give you the ability to include generous amounts of foreground, background and sky simultaneously, creating photos with considerable depth and compositional power. While wide-angle lenses don’t work perfectly for all scenes and circumstances, going wide nonetheless greatly expands your creative options.

Do More With Wide-Angle
Text & Photography By Ian Plant

continue at: outdoorphotographer

Are you making these 5 common composition mistakes?

Are you making these 5 common composition mistakes?
I see photographers making these five common composition mistakes all the time. It’s part of the learning process and every photographer works their way through it.
by Andrew S Gibson

mistakes10a– Using the rule of thirds all the time
– Not learning from other photographers
– Using a zoom lens without thinking
– Not getting close enough to your subject
– Not giving your subject room to breathe

mistakes10bmore at: picturecorrect

10 Simple Steps to Better Wildlife Photography

10 Simple Steps to Better Wildlife Photography

WildLife09aCreating a beautiful image of an elusive creature is an exciting challenge for all nature photographers. Unlike the controlled environments common in zoos and farms, wildlife is fleeting and unpredictable.
Since most opportunities last for just a few short seconds, there is little room for error when the subject finally appears. Equipped with these proven tips and techniques, you can relive yourself of bad experiences through photos you are proud to call your own.

WildLife09b10 Simple Steps to Better Wildlife Photography
by Chris Corradino

WildLife09c1) Choose the Right Shutter…
2) Don’t Fear the ISO…
3) Simplify the Focus…
4) Find the Right Background…
5) Get Down…
6) Always Be Ready…
7) Research…
8) Time of Day…
9) Remain Present…
10) Practice Near Home…

WildLife09d10 Simple Steps to Better Wildlife Photography
by Chris Corradino

read it at: expertphotography

A View of Two Worlds

A View of Two Worlds
Split Photography Tips by Berkley White

BerkleyWhite08a BerkleyWhite08bSplit shots are one of the more difficult shots in underwater photography. Here are our top tips to get you going for success.

Use a Fisheye Lens …
Large Dome Ports Help Smooth Out the Water …
Use High Apertures for Best Depth of Filed (f16 or higher) …
Use Fast Shutterspeeds (1/125 or higher) …
Shoot a Fast Frame Rate (5fps or higher) …

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Split Photography Tips: A View of Two Worlds
By Berkley White, Owner of Backscatter Underwater Video & Photo
continue at: scubadiving

The Top 10 Photography Lighting Facts You Should Know

The Top 10 Photography Lighting Facts You Should Know
And tips on how you can apply them to your photography.
by Dan Richards

Light07aThe farther the light source, the more it falls off— gets dimmer on your subject. The rule says that light falls off as the square of the distance. That sounds complicated, but isn’t really. If you move a light twice as far from your subject, you end up with only one-quarter of the light on the subject.
In other words, light gets dim fast when you move it away— something to keep in mind if you’re moving your lights or your subject to change the quality of the light.
Also remember that bouncing light—even into a shiny reflector that keeps light directional— adds to the distance it travels.
Tip: Set your camera’s flash (pop-up or hot-shoe) to fill flash for outdoor portraits on harshly lit days. This will lighten shadows on your subject’s face but won’t affect the background exposure—it will fall off by then.

Light07bThe broader the light source, the softer the light. The narrower the source, the harder the light. A broad light source lessens shadows, reduces contrast, suppresses texture. A narrow light source does the opposite. This is because, with a broad source, light rays hit your subject from more directions, which tends to fill in shadows and give more even illumination to the scene.
Tip: Position a portrait subject near a large, bright window that does not receive direct sunlight. It makes for a no-cost softbox— no studio equipment necessary.

Light07cShadows create volume. That’s how photographers describe threedimensionality, the sense of seeing an image as an object in space, not projected on a flat surface.
Again, lighting from the side, above, or below, by casting deeper and longer shadows, creates the sense of volume. Still-life, product, and landscape photographers use angular lighting for this reason.
Tip: Try “Hollywood lighting” for a dramatic portrait. Position a light high above and slightly to the side of your subject, angled down, but not so much that the shadow of the nose falls more than midway down the upper lip.

Light07dDiffusion scatters light, essentially making the light source broader and therefore softer. When clouds drift in front of the sun, shadows get less distinct. Add fog, and the shadows disappear. Clouds, overcast skies, and fog act as diffusion—something that scatters the light in many directions. On overcast or foggy days, the entire sky, in effect, becomes a single very broad light source—nature’s softbox.
Tip: Materials such as translucent plastic or white fabric can be used to diffuse a harsh light source. You can place a diffuser in front of an artiflcial light, such as a strobe. Or, if you’re in bright sun, use a light tent or white scrim to soften the light falling on your subject.

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more at: popphoto