My Winter Wonderland

For this photo contest we invited you to share your best shots showing the wonders of winter…

Congratulations Grand Jury Winner “Bubbles” by FarhatM
— – —

Congratulations People’s Choice “Just Chill ” by brandonborn
— – —

Congratulations Runner Up “Some cool scenery from Iceland ” by hjorturlevi
— – —

Congratulations Runner Up “Algonquin Park in Winter ” by Paul_Joslin
— – —

Congratulations Honorary Mention “Mer de Glace ” by ollybowman
— – —

Congratulations Honorary Mention “Bird’s eye view ” by zlimmen
— – —

My Winter Wonderland Photo Contest Winners
more at viewbug

— – —

Slovenia in Winter

Slovenia: Snow Covered Mountains, Lakes, and Historic Churches
Discover this amazing region with towering mountains, glacial lakes, snow covered forests, and historic villages including the city of Ljubljana.

— – —

Slovenia in Winter
more at Muench Workshops

— – —

Winter Royalty | Tracking one Cool Cat!

Megan Lorenz of Etobicoke spent months bonding with and photographing a spectacular Canada lynx.

Canada lynx are said to be elusive and secretive but that hasn’t been my experience. Every now and then, you come across an animal that doesn’t follow the expected behaviour of their species, and appears to seek human company from certain individuals. I’m not referring to habituated animals that have learned to beg for food, or ones that live in a campground and are comfortable around any person they see. Some animals appear to develop a bond with a chosen person or people while avoiding others. I can’t explain this behaviour, but I’m lucky to have experienced it.

— – —

Winter Royalty
Tracking one Cool Cat!
by Megan Lorenz

more in Reader’s Digest | Our Canada

— – —

Tips to Improve Your Winter Compositions

Is winter photography really any different from that of other seasons? Yes, and no. The basics of landscape photograph apply regardless of the season, but my approach and preparedness can be different in the winter. Here are some tips that might help you improve your winter compositions
By Peter Baumgarten

Focus on winter’s unique features
Winter definitely has elements that no other season has – mainly, ice and snow. Incorporate them as key subjects in your compositions. Sometimes those ice formations may not look all that impressive from the height of a 6’2″ photographer like myself. That’s when I get in close, shoot low and use an ultra-wide angle lens, making them look larger and more dramatic than they really are. By getting in close you can also take advantage of how nicely some ice features can transmit the light.

— – —

Focus in on the details
This strategy works regardless of the season. Rather than just looking at the big picture spend some time focusing in on the minutiae of the scene. Frost and ice can really make a plain subject pop. Areas with open water, or nights with higher humidity can create some great hoarfrost when the thermometer dips below freezing.

— – —

Visit a National Park
National parks are amazing locations during any season. Some of my most memorable, and photographically fruitful trips have been made during the winter months. A fresh blanket of snow can add to that already stunning scenery. And the added benefit is that there will be far fewer people to contend with.

— – —

Make your own point of interest
In each of the photos in this article I have tried to include at least one key element that your eye will be drawn to. Sometimes you get to a location and there really isn’t anything that jumps out at you and screams, “Photograph me!”. In those situations I know I have to work the scene. That might mean manipulating the environment a bit in order to create a point of interest that will draw the viewer into the image.

— – —

more in: 10 Tips to Improve Your Winter Compositions
by Peter Baumgarten, Olympus Visionary
at Olympus

— – —

Capture The Extreme

Following the launch of the Frank Hurley Photographer’s Jacket, a world-first collaboration between Shackleton and Leica Camera AG, we are hosting a photography competition to celebrate the cultures, wildlife and beauty of the planet at its coldest.

The motivation behind the Frank Hurley Photographer’s Jacket is to encourage photographers to continue taking photos through the coldest months; to persevere for that next image when the conditions are doing their best to force you home.

One of the many great aspects to outdoor photography is the unpredictability. Mother Nature doesn’t hang around for you. You have to dig deep, no matter the weather, and be ready if and when it all comes together. It’s often in these tough moments, when your body and mind are tired, that the most amazing events happen. We want to see these moments.

Timothy Floyd, North America
— – —

Jon Roberts, Finland
— – —

Carsten Riedl, Czech Republic
— – —

Richard Ghorbal, Greenland
— – —

Olle Claeson, Svalbard
— – —

“Capture The Extreme” photography competition
more at Shackleton

— – —

Romantic Road Shots with Destiny

“I want to go on a road trip, just you and me. The highway, the radio, the blue sky, the backroads, and with our windows down, we’ll talk about everything and nothing. We’ll sing our hearts out, and we’ll make memories that we’ll never forget. Just you and me…” -Anonymous via Wordporn

Photo by Gennady Shatov
— – —

“Winter road” by Regina Šarkuvienė
— – —

“On Highway 136 crossing the Coso Range, Eastern California” by Dr. Hans-Ulrich Schlageter
— – —

Photo by Mauro Morando
— – —

“November’s Color Palette” by Carlie Hensley
— – —

Romantic Road Shots with Destiny
more at gurushots

— – —

Winterscapes

Winterscapes by Valtteri Mulkahainen
“I am a teacher from Finland. I’ve been photographing for couple years as my hobby”

Зимнее солнце Лапландии
— – —

Стражи зимней Лапландии
— – —

Парк Юрского периода
— – —

Поклон морозному дню
— – —

Зимний зоопарк
— – —

Winterscapes by Valtteri Mulkahainen
more at 35photo

— – —