Street Photography by Siegfried Hansen

“Street Photography has a little bit of everything – reportage, documentation, art and composition”
Siegfried Hansen

Photographing people and the street is a true art, born of a deep-seated passion. And as Siegfried Hansen said, “street photography is reportage, documentation, art and composition”. Zoom has chosen to dedicate its final issue for 2017 to those photographers who have always reveled in the urban scene, in capturing the city and its people. Their attention to composition is extreme, as is their view of their subjects and the use of color and natural lighting. Some prefer black-and-white, others strong color contrast. Some search out that fleeting moment, others the irony of daily life. When and where are not important. What counts is bringing to life photographs that immortalize instants of infinity.
Cover: Siegfried Hansen
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more at Zoom Magazine

Street Photography | Denys Nevozhai

Street Photography by Denys Nevozhai

Steam-powered police car.
Manhattan is a special place for photography. You can find funny scenes on every step.
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Flatiron permanence.
I had to spend like 15 minutes sitting in crooked position on the ground to take many many shots with different exposures. Beauty is everywhere.
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Street Style Sunset.
This sunset was possible because of the street that ends at the waterfront of the Hudson River in New York.
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Cyber noir.
Took this shot from the top of a tunnel in San Francisco downtown.
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Street Photography
Photographer: Denys Nevozhai
via BackDoor Magazine

Street Art Around The World

I try to combine street photography with street art in a complementary way. By adding a human element into the frame you can often enhance the artwork that already exists. Through timing and placement you can end up with an image in which life imitates the art itself.
Geraint Rowland, Photographer

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Street Art Around The World
more in Dezine – Issue 04

Create Your Own Style in Street Photography

Street photography has grown and rebelled against dogmas. It’s time for your own style.
Photos & Text: Gathot Subroto

gathotsubroto12a gathotsubroto12b gathotsubroto12c gathotsubroto12d gathotsubroto12eIt is frequently asked why those people, including me, choose street photography; why don’t they choose such other photography genres as landscape, fashion, culture, food and others? Certainly the answers could be diverse, different from one to another.

One of the most general reasons is its practicality. Street photography is easy to do. We just go out and interact with public spaces around us. All the places offer different stories and interactions making the street photography not expensive. Wo don’t need to go far away by plane to find its subjects, and also don’t need to buy expensive photography equipments.

I myself knew street photography because of my curiosity and I wanted to try something new. It was the beginning before I then explored and felt that there was something interesting in the genre.

gathotsubroto12fGathot Subroto
Active in photography since 1990 when he was involved in publishing his campus magazine, he has learned photography autodidactically. He works now as a civil servant at the Indonesia Ministry of Finance. He is one of Indonesian X-photographers – official photographers of Fujifilm Corp.

more in:
Exposure 101st Edition

10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography

10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography
by Mike Boening, Olympus Trailblazer

MikeBoening02aStreet photography is one of the most exciting forms of photography because all you need to do is go for a “walk.” Actually, it may not be a simple as that but documenting everyday life can get easier as you explore and practice this exciting genre of photography. Capturing that decisive moment when an image becomes more than just a snapshot can happen by following a few tips.

MikeBoening02b1- Check your settings
Street photography is not always technical in nature.
At its roots it’s about emotion and the mood of an image. But, no matter what, you still have to know your camera settings. Understanding your camera is a big key into forgetting about it, so you can focus on the composition of the image. I try to shoot most of my street photography in “P” Mode setting my ISO on Auto with its high end being 6400. When I do this I am letting the camera think for me, while I think about the scene in the viewfinder. Now, I modify this on occasions like night shooting or if I am intentionally trying to create blur in my images, but I select the “P” Mode because it lets me focus on the emotion, which is the most important part of my creative process.

MikeBoening02c10 Tips for Compelling Street Photography
by Mike Boening, Olympus Trailblazer

MikeBoening02dcontinue at: getolympus

MikeBoening02e

Street Photography Guide – Part 3

Street Photography Guide – Part 3
What to shoot in the streets
7 things to look for…

SP3guide11a… I firmly believe hat there’s only 3 complementary ways to develop your photography:
To go out and shoot
To learn it
To be inspired by others

Nothing beats shooting for yourself or having someone by your side. Inspiration is the second best thing and I will dare say that Inspiration is crucial for photography. Ansel Adams got inspired by a book given to him while sick, Henri Cartier Bresson picked up a magazine and found one image that inspired him to take on photography seriously. You can go ahead a find the photographers to be inspired from or they can come to you…

SP3guide11bStreet Photography Guide
more at: theinspiredeye