Foreground, Middleground, Background

Add a sense of depth to your scenic and wildlife images
When you photograph scenics, and even wildlife images, it’s important to have a strong foreground, middleground and background to add a sense of depth to the image. For scenics, it’s imperative to have these layers. More so than when you make wildlife images, but if it’s good for the goose, it’s good for the gander.

The foreground element allows the viewer to enter the picture. The middleground adds a component that holds the viewer’s interest. The first two layers should lead the observer to the background element to complete the image. To have all three elements work in harmony helps improve the photograph.
Text & Photography By Russ Burden

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Foreground, Middleground, Background
more at Outdoor Photographer

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Moody Landscapes | Moody Wildlife

Learn how to capture mood in your landscape and wildlife photos
by Russ Burden

Depending on where you live, clouds may dominate your skies for 250-plus days of the year. This is more the norm around coastal areas and is governed by the seasons. I’m lucky to live in Colorado where I have just the opposite: 250 to 300-plus days of sunshine. But from a photographer’s standpoint, the word “lucky” can be deceiving. If my pursuit is wildlife, I’m ecstatic if I’m bestowed crisp bright mornings or afternoons of sun bathing my subject in warm golden light. But from a landscape photographer’s viewpoint, things are different. Where’s the drama in the light? Where’s the mood? Where’s the color? Since cloudy or severe, clear blue sky days are more the norm, I welcome days of fog, mood, haunting skies and drama with open arms. The rarity of these conditions is what allows landscape photographs to stand apart from those that are made under “ordinary” conditions. It’s with this in mind I devote this week’s and next week’s Tips of the Week to photos that resonate with mood.

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Moody Landscapes | Moody Wildlife
more at outdoor photographer

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Open-Minded Illumination

If the conditions prevent you from taking great images, dig a bit deeper into your creativity to come away with winners
Text & Photography by Russ Burden

Words of wisdom come from places you least expect to hear them. Not in my wildest dreams did I think I’d be enlightened by a total stranger seated next to me at the airport. His words were something to the effect of, “My initial flight was canceled, my aisle seat was changed to a middle one, the weather delay is messing with my mind and the kid behind me on my first flight kept kicking my seat, but a bad two days of air travel is still better than two days at work when your destination is where you’ve dreamed about going all your life.”

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Open-Minded Illumination
read more at Outdoor Photographer

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Natural Framing In Landscape Photography

Use framing to direct the viewer’s attention to a specific location within the composition.

Natural framing is a popular technique in landscape photography where the photographer deliberately places the primary subject in a position where accompanying elements surround it, highlight it or call attention to it. A connection between the objects framing the subject and the subject itself should exist. The goal of the frame is to direct the viewer’s attention to a specific location within the composition. It unifies the primary focal point with natural or man-made objects that surround it. These objects add a sense of depth and also help identify the environment in which the image was created.

Text & Photography by Russ Burden
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Natural Framing In Landscape Photography
more at Outdoor Photographer

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