“Symmetry”

Symmetry, the similarity or exact correspondence between different things capture the eye of photographers every minute of every day. These wonderful matching patterns made by nature or humans always seem to offer a soothing sense of balance and harmony.

Double Trouble by ​Pedro Jarque
First Place Winner
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Simultaneous by Bence Mate
Second Place Winner
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The Guest​ by Yves Demers
Third Place Winner
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Classical Symmetry by André Boto
Honorable Mention Winner
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Winter Symmetry by Ales Krivec
Shortlist
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“Symmetry”
More amazing images that shortlisted into the top tier of this themes competition at The Motif Collective. A big congratulations to all of the talented photographers that participated!

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Winners of the RSB Photographer of the Year competition

‘Patterns in nature’ is the theme of the 2018 competition. Life on Earth encompasses a myriad of regular forms, sequences and structures and we invite you to capture these details of biology. The judges are looking for an original interpretation of the theme.

The winning entry for Young Photographer of the Year category, taken by 17 year old Jack Olive from Devon, depicts a striking leopard gecko looking directly down the camera lens.
Jack said of his submission: “The leopard gecko stared down the lens allowing me to take this picture. I also wanted to show the yellow and black scale pattern as well as the beautiful eye.”
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The winning entry for Photographer of the Year category, submitted by Roberto Bueno, captures intricate trails left by larvae on autumnal leaves on the forest floor in the Yukon valley, in Canada.
Roberto said of his submission: “The forests of the north are beautiful in autumn, with the variety of colours of the trees. A little larvae is an autumnal surprise in the northern woods of Alaska and Yukon.
“The feeding behaviour of aspen leaf miner (Phyllocnistis populiella) larvae, on the leaves of aspen (Populus tremuloides), make interesting patterns, with intricate trails on every leaf. The floor of the yellow forest becomes a new world to enjoy nature.”
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Bouquet de fleurs (highly commended)
Photographer: Håkan Kvarnström
Dinobryon Divergens is commonly known as golden algae. Measuring about 50 µm in length, it lives in lakes and ponds around the world and forms colonies composed of about 6 to 50 cells that are surrounded by a vase-like shell of cellulose.
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Flock of seagulls
Photographer: Viraj Ghaisas
I shot this image near the gateway of India. In winter, these birds congregate in several places where the locals have made it a daily ritual to feed them junk food.
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Dead leaf or almost
Photographer: Guilhem Duvot
A dead leaf grasshopper. The perfect camouflage – nature is amazing. I saw the grasshopper only because it jumped.
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You might wish to explore how animals use spots, stripes and other shapes to camouflage and signal; or capture the collective arrangement of wildlife in colonies, herds and shoals. Your photograph could depict the spirals and symmetries of the plant kingdom to the meanders and tessellations as seen in wider landscapes.
We also welcome entries that explore this theme at a molecular or cellular level, illustrating regular patterns that can only be observed with the aid of a microscope such as cell division and gene expression.
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Winners of the RSB Photographer of the Year competition
more at Royal Society of Biology