Visit 20 architectural marvels around the globe

From apartment buildings to ancient masterpieces, these structures offer glimpses into city life around the world.

Building design can inspire a sense of place, tell tales of the past, and offer glimpses into the lives of a city’s residents. And although the impact of grand structures such as Manhattan’s Art Deco skyscrapers or Antoni Gaudi’s eclectic buildings in Barcelona is undeniable, it’s often the smaller, ordinary buildings that tell the truths of day-to-day life. For the attentive eye, the symmetry of a store window can be just as illuminating as the spectacularly painted ceiling of a mosque—and both places have their own story to tell.

New York, New York
Reflections from late afternoon light dance off a building in Midtown Manhattan. Midtown, one of the largest business districts in the world, is known for its iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.
Photograph by Montgomery Gilchrist
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Tokyo, Japan
Colorful lights contrast with the dark windows of an apartment building along Tokyo Bay in Japan. As Japan’s largest city, Tokyo has over nine million residents and apartments are a popular choice for many of them.
Photograph by Massimo Rumi
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Isfahan, Iran
A view of the intricate ceiling of the Music Hall in Iran’s Ali Qapu grand palace. The unusual cutouts in the ceiling are both beautiful and functional—they were designed to dampen echoes and enhance acoustics for musical performances.
Photograph by Hamidreza Bagheri
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Paris, France
The historic buildings of Rue de Rivoli in Paris, France, are reflected with a modern twist. One of the most famous streets in the city, the Rue de Rivoli is lined with fashion boutiques and art galleries, especially near the Louvre.
Photograph by Martina Biccheri
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Pyongyang, North Korea
Colorful buildings surround the Monument to Party Founding in North Korea’s capital city. The monument recognizes the Workers’ Party of North Korea, and uses a hammer, paintbrush, and sickle to represent workers, intellectuals, and farmers, respectively.
Photograph by Absent Ink
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20 mesmerizing photos of architecture across the globe
more by Erin Spencer
at National Geographic

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Aerials by Jeffrey Milstein

Jeffrey Milstein is a photographer, architect, graphic designer, and pilot. Milstein’s photographs have been exhibited and collected throughout the United States and Europe, and are currently represented in the USA by Paul Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles and Bonni Benrubi Gallery in NYC; and in Europe by Young Gallery in Brussels . In 2012 Milstein’s work was presented in a solo show at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, and included in New Typologies, curated by noted British photographer and critic, Martin Parr. His photographs have been published in New york Times, Los Angeles Times, Harpers,Time, Fortune, European Photography, American Photo, Eyemazing, Die Ziet, Wired, PDN, Esquire, and Condi Naste Traveler. Abrams published Milstein’s aircraft work as a monograph in 2007, and Monacelli published his extensive body of work from Cuba as a monograph in April 2010. Born in Los Angeles, where he frequently returns to shoot at the International Airport, Milstein makes his home in Woodstock, NY.

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Aerials by Jeffrey Milstein
more at Kopeikin Gallery

New York and LA from Above

In the preface to his new book “LA NY: Aerial Photographs of Los Angeles and New York,” Jeffrey Milstein writes that the images combine “two of my life’s passion: flying and art.” The book, published this week by Thames & Hudson, presents Milstein’s graphically exact and highly detailed aerial photos of what he calls “my two cities,” New York and Los Angeles. (A related show of the work is on view at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles until December 23.) Made over the course of five years, Milstein’s images are organized into four sections, depicting neighborhoods, parks and recreational spaces, transportation systems and industry. The book juxtapose views of each city, allowing for comparisons between the tightly packed buildings of Greenwich Village and the pastel roofs, curving lawns and expanses of sand in Lancaster, a city in Los Angeles County. In another comparison, the star-shaped enclosure around the Statue of Liberty echoes the octagonal building at the end of the Manhattan Beach pier.

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LA NY: Aerial Photographs of Los Angeles and New York
by Jeffrey Milstein

more at PDN

Jonas in NYC by Michele Palazzo

This Photograph of the NYC Winter Storm Looks Like an Impressionist Painting

MichelePalazzo01aWhile walking through the Jonas Winter Storm that swept across the East Coast last week, photographer Michele Palazzo captured this incredible shot of the Flatiron Building against a backdrop of swirling snow. With the exception of a few minor details like logos and a food cart, the image looks like an impressionist right out of another another century. The cloudy atmosphere and gusty winds creates patterns that appear uncannily like brush strokes.
by Christopher Jobson
at thisiscolossal

MichelePalazzo01b

New York Air | George Steinmetz

New York Air | George Steinmetz
Anastasia Photo is pleased to present New York Air, George Steinmetz’s fourth show at the gallery.
November 3, 2015—January 9, 2016

GeorgeSteinmetz11a GeorgeSteinmetz11b GeorgeSteinmetz11c GeorgeSteinmetz11d GeorgeSteinmetz11eNew York Air captures the thrilling complexity and romance of 21st-century New York City from above. With its new skyline and waterfront landscape, dazzling contemporary architecture and historic buildings—along with parks and streets and rooftops used for every possible purpose, and the massive infrastructure that keeps it all going, New York Air presents a captivating view of one of the world’s greatest cities from above. Included in the exhibition are such iconic places as Central Park and Times Square, new landmarks such as the High Line and the September 11 Memorial, One World Trade Center, and intriguing sites throughout the five boroughs. Steinmetz records some of the city’s beloved traditions—such as the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, the New York marathon, and the U.S. Open—but what makes his photographs special is their surprising intimacy capturing New Yorkers going about their daily lives.

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New York Air by George Steinmetz
more at: anastasia-photo