Basics Photography – Lighting

This book covers all forms of lighting and the equipment that produces it. Dedicated chapters explain the basic theory of light, natural light, light that is available and light that is specifically produced for photography. Later chapters look at how to control and use light, encouraging experimentation and exploration.

The book is illustrated throughout with thought-provoking and creative images from contemporary practitioners, some of which have been taken especially for the book. Technical photographic concepts are identified, examined and explained in a straightforward manner.

Remains of the day
by Adam Burton
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Noonday church
by Rod Edwards
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Minaret turn
by Dale Sanders
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Early morning dear
by Andy Flowerday
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The Basics Photography series from AVA Publishing’s Academia list comprises a collection of titles including: Lighting, Composition, Capturing Colour, Post-Production Black & White, Post-Production Colour and Working in Black & White. Packed with useful tips and fully illustrated with clear diagrams and inspiring imagery, they offer an essential introduction to the subject.

Understanding lighting is fundamental to good photography and a good photographer learns to paint with light. How any image is lit will change how the viewer sees and interprets the content.

The book is split into six sections. The first section looks into the theory and background of how all light ‘works’ for the photographer; the different types of light and the rules it obeys. Natural light, available light and photographic light sources in the studio are all explained and key guidance given on how to measure light for the best photographic exposure.

The book concludes by looking at how to control and use light. Mastery of the basics of lighting will give the reader confidence to explore and experiment. Technical concepts are explained through the use of clear diagrams and in a glossary that runs throughout each section. The book is beautifully illustrated with inspiring and compelling images, many taken especially for this publication.

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Olympus Visionary | Tracie Maglosky

Tracie Maglosky is an award-winning wedding and portrait photographer living in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio area. Her studio is located in the heart of downtown Cincinnati’s Brewery and Arts District in OTR. As a distinguished member of the Visionary Program for Olympus, she travels frequently to present her photography, lighting and posing techniques for weddings, maternity and newborn photography and proven business strategies.

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Olympus Visionary
Tracie Maglosky

more at Olympus

Mastering the Model Shoot: Everything a Photographer Needs to Know Before, During, and After the Shoot

For the first time ever, world-famous photographer and fashion lighting instructor Frank Doorhof takes you behind the scenes to reveal every step of his model-photography workflow–the same workflow that has made him a hero to photographers around the world thanks to his practical, budget conscious, no-nonsense approach.

In this groundbreaking book, Frank starts right at the beginning with how to find models, find great locations, work with backgrounds (you’ll be amazed at his tricks for creating stunning backgrounds for just a few bucks), and work by yourself or with a team (stylist, hair stylist, and makeup artist) to create an image that will get your photography noticed. Then, it’s on to an in-depth look at the lighting setups and looks that made Frank famous (complete with diagrams and detailed explanations).

You’ll see how Frank lights his images (you’ll be shocked at how simple most of his lighting setups are and you’ll be able to create these same setups yourself), plus he covers the critical little stuff nobody else is talking about, including: how to calibrate your monitor (and why it’s so important); how to use a color target to nail your color every single time; and why (and how) to use a light meter to get consistent, reproducible lighting each and every shoot.

Frank also shares his own retouching techniques through step-by-step tutorials, and he takes you from start to finish through a number of different looks so you can see exactly how it’s done, and recreate these same looks yourself. If you’ve ever wished there was one book that covers it all, the whole process of photographing models from start to finish, not leaving anything out, then this is the book for you.

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Mastering the Model Shoot: Everything a Photographer Needs to Know Before, During, and After the Shoot

by Frank Doorhof

Black & White Photography Guidebook 2017

Overview: Black and white photography has been with us for a long time. It remains an almost magical and timeless medium. Even in this full-colour modern world, its popularity is undiminished, with those new to it being captivated by its simplicity and power. The Black & White Photography Guidebook was created with the simple aim of introducing you to the world of black and white photography, and as a result, we hope you will enjoy new levels of artistic scope.

Gathered within these pages are numerous guides and tutorials to help you on your journey of photographic creativity including:
The origins of photography, History of black and white, Black and white core concepts, Seeing in black and white, Photography tips, Mono conversion techniques, Mono landscape photography, Portrait Photography, Type of light modifiers, Lighting techniques and expert lighting diagrams, High-key portraiture, Low-key portraiture, Abstract black and white photography, Essential gear guide, Filter types and systems, Printing your photographs, Developing and printing black and white film, Dodge and burn technique, Sepia toning, Selective colour…
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Black & White Photography Guidebook 2017
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The Power Of Portable Light

I have traveled 4,625 miles to get this image. I’m stumbling through the volcanic landscape in the murky predawn darkness trying to find the Moai statues. The salty breeze and crashing surf remind me of early-morning shoots in Hawaii. But this isn’t Hawaii. I’m on Easter Island, one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world. And if I don’t get this iconic shot of the Moai statues at sunrise, I’ll never forgive myself. I need this shot for my photo essay of the island.
Text & Photography By Tom Bol
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Moai Statue At Sunset. Nikon D3, 24-70mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot at 1/50 sec. at ƒ/8, Nikon SB-800 used off-camera to light the statue.
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Egypt. Nikon D2X and 17-35mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot with a Nikon SB-800 to add catchlights to the subjects’ eyes in the bright overhead sun.
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TOP: Scotland. Nikon Df and 24-70mm ƒ/2.8 lens, shot at 1/100 sec. at ƒ/7.1. In this before shot, the telephone booth appears lifeless without flash. ABOVE: The same gear and settings were used, but by using a single speedlight, the telephone booth comes to life. A Nikon SB-910 was placed in the booth and fired off-camera using a Nikon SU-800 transmitter.
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The Power Of Portable Light
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Tom Bol | Five Classic Lighting Recipes

Five Classic Lighting Recipes
Text & Photography by Tom Bol

tombol09a1. Soft Lighting
Lighting all starts with one light, and sometimes that is all you need, but not all single lights are equal.
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tombol09b2. Rembrandt Lighting
Say you only have one simple light and no big softbox. What kind of portrait can you create with a single edgy light? Try using Rembrandt lighting for a dramatic look.
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tombol09c3. Rim Lighting
Another single-light technique is rim lighting. Rim lighting illuminates a side profile of your subject, creating a dramatic portrait. This technique requires a single softbox and a dark background.
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tombol09d4. Clamshell Lighting
Have you ever seen a beauty shot where the subject seems so vibrant and lively it really catches your eye? I constantly embarrass my family at the checkout line in the grocery store. I’m the guy staring at the bikini model on the magazine cover, trying to see what catchlights are in her eyes and what lighting technique was used. More often than not, clamshell lighting is the technique being used.
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tombol09e5. Cross Lighting
If someone asked me what lighting technique I use the most, I’d reply cross lighting. This lighting technique uses two light sources opposite one another with your subject in the middle. One light will be illuminating your subject’s front, while the second light will be an accent light illuminating his shoulder, hair or backside. Any combination of softboxes, reflectors and umbrellas can be used.
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Five Classic Lighting Recipes by Tom Bol
more at Digital Photo

Studio Basics | First Setups

Studio Basics | First Setups

Low-key, Mid-key, High-key:
3 fundamental lighting setups.
An introduction to your first studio setups.

In this second episode, Mark Cleghorn explains the 3 main setups you need to know to get started with flash photography.
All you need is 2 flash heads and try out the 3 photographic techniques: “low-key”, “mid-key” and “high-key”.
Once you’ve apprehended these principal lighting concepts, you can master almost any type of studio flash setups.