Listen Up!

The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion.
Albert Camus by way of Katy Perry
Wmagazine September 2017

The artistic, sexual, emotional, and political liberation of Katy Perry.
By Lynn Hirschberg
Photographs by Steven Klein
Styled by Edward Enninful

via the fashion spot

Work every angle

Dutch-Ecuadorian photographer Cris Toala Olivares is one of the new breed of young photographers carving out an eclectic career. He is fascinated by natural phenomena and engineered natural wonders, which he documents from helicopters and with drones as well as from the ground. His comprehensive work on volcanic eruptions, the Wadden Sea and Amsterdam’s canal belt speak to the beauty of working every angle. But as Cris explains to CPN Web Editor Deniz Dirim, to reach new heights you need to be business-savvy first…

— – —

Work every angle
Cris Toala Olivares

more at Canon

Street Art Around The World

I try to combine street photography with street art in a complementary way. By adding a human element into the frame you can often enhance the artwork that already exists. Through timing and placement you can end up with an image in which life imitates the art itself.
Geraint Rowland, Photographer

— – —

Street Art Around The World
more in Dezine – Issue 04

Earth From Above

Explore our awe-inspiring planet, continent by continent, through incredible images captured from the air by the likes of drones and satellites…

The pearls of Bahrain
Shaped like an ornate necklace, the Durrat Al-Bahrain islands are an artificial archipelago, whose name translates as ‘the most perfect pearl’. To create the 20km2 of new land off the south-east coast of Bahrain, 34 million cubic metres of material was dredged from the seafloor of the Persian Gulf. The islands are like mini towns with luxury homes, shopping malls and schools.
— – —

The land of extremes
The rich red-orange sand dunes of the Namib Desert stretch inland towards the Naukluft Mountains. Most moisture from the Atlantic falls as rain near the coast, yet some rolls across the arid desert as fog, quenching wildlife and oxidising the iron in the sand dunes to create their red colour. Highland water flows down the Kuiseb River greening the land to the north. In the south, as the Tsondab River hits the desert, water evaporates, leaving behind white salt and mineral deposits.
— – —

The great desert
This shot of part of t he Sahara in Western Libya was captured by EarthKAM – a NASA programme where students from all over the world can ask for images to be taken from the International Space Station of specific locations on Earth. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, with northeasterly winds that can reach hurricane levels, and as little as 2.5cm of rain on average each year.
— – —

Island birth
The world’s youngest island, Nishinoshima, is made up of two sections which formed over 60 years apart. The lower section was created in 1973 when an underwater volcano erupted, while the upper part first broke through the ocean’s surface in November 2013, merging with its neighbour soon after. Every day, the island produces 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of lava.
— – —

At the heart of green energy
Over 4,000 mirrors direct sunlight to a boiler in a central tower at the Khi Solar One power plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. At full capacity the boiler heats up to a toasty 530ºC. The plant began commercial operation in February 2016, and supplies energy to around 45,000 homes.
— – —

more in:
Earth from Above
Our planet as you’ve never seen it before

Part of the BBC Focus Magazine Collection

Landscapes by Jim Harmer

One thing photographers have in common is the desire to progress as artists. For some it might be technical skills, others the creative, more artistic side. And for many of us, it is both sides that we want to grow in. Fortunately some photographers that are further along that pathway are more then happy to share and teach others. Jim Harmer is one of those photographers. He’s got an amazing eye, brilliant technical skills and loves sharing his knowledge. You may have heard of Jim through his online site, Improve Photography or from his podcast or social media.

— – —

We got together with Jim and asked how it all began…

continue in Photo Live [ For the Love of Photography ]

Reimagining Californian Landscapes Through Infrared

Kate Ballis transforms familiar scenes into Technicolor dreamscapes in her new Infra Realism series
At first glance, Kate Ballis’ candy-coloured landscapes are reminiscent of the hand-tinted photographs that were prevalent in the mid-19th century, but these gorgeous popsicle-palette images were created with the aid of a specially converted infrared camera as opposed to a paintbrush.

— – —

Reimagining Californian Landscapes Through Infrared by Kate Ballis
more at AnOther Mag

Nikon D7500 or D7200… or D500… or D750?

Nikon’s new enthusiast all-rounder attempts to combine features, performance, image quality and value.

The Nikon D7500 does not boast any dramatic new technologies but it does fill a significant gap in Nikon’s DSLR range. Before, enthusiasts had to choose between the powerful but relatively pedestrian D7200 and the much more advanced – and much more expensive – D500. Nikon’s latest addition to its DX line-up is designed to offer a balance between high-end performance and features, and price.

The D7200 is cheaper and has 24 megapixels. why don’t I just buy that?

Yes, the D7200’s strengths are its range of features, outright image quality, solid construction and great handling. But it’s not a sports or low-light specialist. Its continuous shooting speed isn’t bad at 6fps, but its 26-shot Raw buffer capacity falls way short of the D7500’s 50 shots, and its AF system lacks Group Area AF mode. The D7200’s older sensor delivers plenty of resolution, but more noise with it, so by the time you reach medium to high-ISO settings, the difference in image quality between these two cameras will become apparent. It doesn’t have the D7500’s tilting screen or touch-screen control, either. And for video, the 4K D7500 is a clear winner.

The bottom line:The D7200 is a terrific all-round camera, but just remember it’s not built for speed or low light.

Will I regret not going the extra mile and buying the D500?

You might, but you need to be clear what the extra cash is getting you – another 2fps continuous shooting speed, an even larger memory buffer and Nikon’s latest high-tech 153-point autofocus system. The D500 is also built like a tank and uses Nikon’s professional control layout, and is slightly more responsive. The D500 has twin memory cards slots (1 SD, 1 XQD) whereas the D7500 only has one, and although its LCD is the same size, it has more than twice the resolution. You’re paying a lot more money and you’re getting a lot more camera, but the D500’s advantages are all geared to the rough and tumble of a serious action photographer’s lifestyle.

The bottom line:The D500 is worth the extra only for sports fans and pros looking for a second, speedy DX-format body.

At this price, why don’t I just take the plunge and go for the full frame D750?

Absolutely! But this is where you need some crystal-clear thinking about where you want to go with your photography. If you’re looking for an all-round improvement in image quality, like exploring a mixture of subjects and are keen to progress as an artist or as a professional, the D750 is indeed the better choice. A DX-format camera like the D7500 is restricted partly by its sensor size, but also by lens choice; for the best choice of primes and constant-aperture zooms at both standard and shorter focal lengths, Nikon’s FX format is the way to go. But if your interest lies in sports/action/low-light photography, the D7500 delivers more bang for your buck.

The bottom line:If you can afford to buy the D7500, maybe you can afford to go full frame with the D750.

— – —

More in N Photo – Summer 2017
by Rod Lawton

Digital Camera World