Capture drool-worthy photos of your favorite foods with these photography tips.


Take a moment to play around with basic photo framing: the rule of thirds, S curves, leading lines, diagonal lines, and symmetry versus asymmetry. Certain foods may look beautiful when arranged on a simple plate, while other foods take on a new form if you fill your frame with an extreme close-up. On the opposite side of the spectrum, you don’t have to fit everything in your photo every time. Let your viewer’s imagination run wild by choosing to share just a part of your seven-course spread.

Natural lighting is good, but natural lighting with a hazy filter is even better. Always aim to shoot outdoors during golden hour or use translucent curtains to filter intense light through windows. Also, don’t be afraid of shooting at a high ISO (400 – 1600) to get an artfully grainy shot. If neither of these options are available, use a camera with manual settings to adjust exposure or a lens with a fast aperture that captures more light when shooting delectable dishes in low light areas. Just leave the flash off.

A perfect image is all in the prep. This could mean work-in-progress shots of diced vegetables on a wooden board or fruit sitting in a harvest basket waiting to be baked. Use ingredients to add character and texture by creating imperfections like overflowing sauces, dollops of cream, herbs, crumbs, and grains of sea salt. Again, think about the depth of your photo and focus on various ingredients to see what yields the best shot.

I always say that composition is 51 percent of a photo, editing is 49 percent, and lighting is 100 percent. Lighting is everything. Think about what a camera is: it’s a box that lets in light. Beyond that, composition is the foundation of your photo. Because composition is based on universal visual principles, it’s the thing that’s going to make your photograph universally appealing. That being said, editing is the thing that’s going to make your photograph even more attractive. Basically, think of composition like bone structure and editing as your makeup.

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Capture drool-worthy photos of your favorite foods with these photography tips.
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