How to Create a Successful Travel Blog

Who doesn’t wish they could be a travel blogger? Just imagine traveling to the most beautiful parts of the world as your job. Dreamy. One thing travel bloggers have in common is that they make it look easy. Spoiler: It’s not. Just ask Rachel Rudwall, Emmy-nominated on-camera host, producer, camera operator, speaker, writer, photographer, and travel blogger. We caught up with her to get the inside scoop behind her hugely successful blog and Instagram @RachelRoams.

What advice would you give your former self or an aspiring travel blogger?
It’s going to take a long time to establish yourself as an expert who’s worthy of a paycheck, so be prepared to invest both time and funds into building your dream career. If it’s what you truly love, it’ll be worth it every step of the way.
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How to Create a Successful Travel Blog: An Interview with Rachel Roams
more at Olympus

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The Endings: Photographic Stories of Love, Loss, Heartbreak, and Beginning Again

Featuring some of today’s most beloved actors, these piercing photographic vignettes capture female characters in the throes of powerful emotional transformations. Photographer Caitlin Cronenberg and art director Jessica Ennis collected stories of heartbreak, relationship endings, and new beginnings—fictional but often inspired by real life—and set out to convey the raw emotions that are exposed in those most vulnerable of states.

Collaborating with celebrated talents such as Julianne Moore, Keira Knightley, and Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Cronenberg and Ennis developed each character, built her world, and then photographed as she lived the role before the camera. The resulting collection is a bold look at the experience of losing or leaving love and will speak to anyone who appreciates art, photography, and the strength of facing emotional depths head-on.
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Caitlin Cronenberg and Jessica Ennis on the Art of Heartbreak
interview at Elle Canada

Royal Air Force Photographic Competition

Judging for the 2018 Royal Air Force Photographic Competition recently took place at the Royal Air Force Museum London. Over 1,000 photos and 25 videos were entered across the competition’s 13 categories, with the best 9 images being whittled down by 3 industry professional judges, before going head-to-head online to win the ‘Peoples’ Choice’ category.

Remembrance
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
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RAF Centenary
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
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Perfection
Sgt Paul Oldfield, RAF Cosford
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Parallels
SAC Hannah Smoker, RAFAT RAF Scampton
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Selfie
Cpl Tim Laurence, Photo ACSSU RAF Halton
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Smoke In The Sun
Mr Mark Thompson, The Amateur Military Category
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Royal Air Force Photographic Competition
more at RAF

Wild Exposures

Witness nature at its most dramatic, graceful and unexpected with this stunning collection of breathtaking photographs celebrating the natural heritage of the bioregions of Australia and New Zealand, the Antarctic and New Guinea.
This year’s Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year exhibition showcases the timing, patience, artistry and technique of professional, emerging and junior photographers as they capture spectacular moments in time.

Broken Dreams
Runner-up, Landscape
Broken Dreams was from one of my most rewarding but confronting shoots. After the Sampson Flat bushfires swept through the northern Adelaide Hills, I spent a lot of time shooting the aftermath and rebirth during the following year. This particular early morning shoot brought with it fog and an amazing mood.
Gumeracha, South Australia
Sony A7R, Sony 55mm, 1/5, f/10, ISO 100, tripod
by Ben Goode
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Hide and seek
Overall Winner
I travelled to Raja Ampat mainly to visit the stunning Arborek Jetty. If you are really lucky you can observe schools of fish and I spent some time under the jetty. At one point, predators moved in and I was mesmerised by the chase between predator and prey.
Arborek Jetty, Raja Ampat, Indonesia
Nikon D3S, Nikon 16mm, 1/250, f/4.5, ISO 250, Ikelite 161 strobe, Seacam housing
by Tracey Jennings
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Posing Black-fronted Dotterels
Winner, Animal Behaviour
Black-fronted dotterel
Elseyornis melanops
These two black-fronted dotterels seemed to want to pose for me, but I think they might have had something else in mind.
Charleville, Queensland
Nikon D800, Nikon 500mm f/4.0 with 1.4 converter, 1/400, f/5.6, ISO 500, tripod
by Dan Giselsson
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Enchanted
Winner, Animal Habitat and Portfolio Prize
White’s seahorse
Hippocampus whitei
Low evening sunlight backlights White’s seahorse. Many of this species can be found living on the shallow shark nets beneath the boardwalk in Mosman, Sydney Harbour.
Mosman, New South Wales
Nikon D810, Nikkor 8–15mm F3.5–4.5 E ED, 1/125, f/29, ISO 160, two INON Z240 strobes, Aquatica digital water housing and 4-inch glass port
by Matthew Smith
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Junction Falls -After
Winner, Monochrome
In a matter of seconds, Junction Falls went from a trickle to a roaring wall of thundering stormwater on a wet afternoon. I was fortunate to be there to capture the amazing transformation. Shortly after this shot, the embedded log completely disappeared from view.
Junction Falls, Blue Mountains, New South Wales
Canon EOS 1DS Mk III, Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8, 0.6, f/8, ISO 100, tripod
by Peter Hill
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Wild Exposures

more at Nature Photographer of the Year

 

See the world through a new lens

Now in its fifty-fourth year, Wildlife Photographer of the Year showcases extraordinary animal behaviour and the breathtaking diversity of life on Earth.

Explore the world’s best nature photography, exhibited on 100 exquisite light panels.
Experience the changing face of nature and uncover the surprising, and sometimes challenging, stories behind the photographs.
Chosen from over 45,000 entries by expert judges, the images were awarded for their creativity, originality and technical excellence.
This year’s exhibition will open on 19 October.

Highly commended 2018, Urban Wildlife
School visit by Adrian Bliss
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Highly commended 2018, 11 – 14 Years Old
The victor by Adam Hakim Hogg
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Highly commended 2018, Behaviour: Mammals
The meerkat mob by Tertius A Gous
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Highly commended 2018, Animals in their environment
Tigerland by Emmanuel Rondeau
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Highly commended 2018, Animal Portraits
Cool cat by Isak Pretorius
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Wildlife Photographer of the Year
more at National History Museum

Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2018

These are the twelve finalists of LOBA 2018. Thanks again to all participants!

Mary Gelman, Svetlana
In her personal projects, such as “Svetlana”, Mary Gelman specialises in issues such as sexual identity, sexuality, violence and discrimination.
Mary Gelman was born in St. Petersburg in 1994, where she attended DocDocDoc Photography School. Her work has appeared in different Russian media, including Sobaka.ru and lenta.ru, as well as international publications such as the Washington Post and Buzzfeed. In 2017 she won first place at the Istanbul Photo Awards in the Portraits category.
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Daniel Chatard, Niemandsland
Daniel Chartard’s “Niemandsland” (No man’s land) documents the tense, conflict-laden situation existing between environmental activists, on the one hand, and the brown coal industry in the Rhein district, on the other.
Daniel Chatard was born in Heidelberg in 1996, and, after graduating from high school, studied Photojournalism and Documentary Photography. His work to date has earned him the German Youth Photography Award and the BFF Award.
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Christian Werner, Road to Ruin
Christian Werner’s reportages tell emotional stories about the harsh realities of life in conflict zones. “Road to Ruin” – taken following the fall of Aleppo – shows different stations along the way during a trip through Bashar al Assad’s Syria.
Christian Werner was born in Hanover in 1987. He studied Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at college there. His work appears in magazines such as Spiegel, the Washington Post and LFI.
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Samuel Gratacap, Presence
Samuel Gratacap’s work moves between photo journalism and visual art. Since 2007, Gratacap has been documenting the lives of refugees and migrants crossing the Mediterranean. In his “Presence” series, he brings together images from both sides of the Mediterranean for the first time. For this purpose, he photographed in Italy, Tunisia and Libya.
Samuel Gratacap was born in 1982 and studied Art at the École Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Marseille.
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Stephen Dock, Architecture of Violence
The fear of peace and the aftermath of war in a country: this is what interested Stephen Dock about Ireland and launched his “Architecture of Violence” project in 2012.
Stephen Dock studied Photography in Lyon and works as a photojournalist for various French magazines. He is interested in dysfunctional societies and photographs conflict zones such as the West Bank, Syria and Mali.
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Vanja Bucan, Sequences of Truth and Deception
In ihrer Serie “Sequences of Truth and Deception” beschäftigt sich Vanja Bucan mit unserem ambivalenten Verhältnis zur Natur, das, wie sie sagt, von Dominanz, Ausbeutung und Idealisierung geprägt sei. In Porträts und Stillleben versucht Bucan eine vielschichtige und dekonstruierte Vision der Natur zu erzeugen.
Vanja Bucan wurde 1973 in Nova Gorica, Slowenien, geboren. Sie lebt und arbeitet derzeit in Berlin.
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Turi (Salvatore) Calafato, Amuninni ‘u mari (Let’s go to the sea)
In summertime, Sicilians move their lives to the beaches. With his “Amuninni ’u mari” (Let’s go to the sea) series, Turi Calafato observes people in their daily sea-side activities, documenting the colourful hustle and bustle on the beaches.
Turi (Salvatore) Calafato was born in 1979. He lives and works as a free-lance photographer in Italy.
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Elsa Stubbé, Les extraterrestres ont mangé mon jardin
Elsa Stubbé’s work gives wings to the viewer’s imagination, demanding a new definition of our perception of the environment. Her current project “Les extraterrestres ont mangé mon jardin” (Extraterrestrials have eaten my garden) presents surreal images of nature full of hidden poetry, where she explores the borderline between photographic and conceptual art.
Elsa Stubbé received her Masters in Publishing from the Royal Academy of Beaux Arts in Brussels, and has already self-published three books. She has exhibited in Brussels, Marseilles and Liege.
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Max Pinckers, Red Ink
Pinckers wants his work to explore the degree to which photography actually reflects reality. This also applies to his current project, “Red Ink”, that he photographed under strict surveillance in North Korea, and where he plays very specifically with the viewer’s perception.
Max Pinckers’ work moves between visual storytelling, documentary photography and sheer aesthetics. He was already a finalist for the Leica Oskar Barnack Award in 2016.
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Stéphane Lavoué, On the Edge of the World
In “On the Edge of the World”, Lavoué tells the story of the fishing industry through the eyes of those who remain on shore: the women in the canning factories, and the workers that produce tons of ice for storing the fish.
Stéphane Lavoué was born in 1976 and initially graduated in Engineering. He was a finalist for the Leica Oscar Barnack Award in 2016, and winner of the Prix Niépce in 2018.
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Kechun Zhang, Between Mountains and Water
The interaction between people and nature is one of Kechun Zhang’s favourite subjects. In “Between Mountains and Water” he deals with two natural phenomena that touch people’s emotions in China in particular. With his images, he creates documentary artefacts that appear to halt the high- speed passage of time for a brief moment.
Kechun Zhang was born in Sichuan in 1980. After participating in numerous international photo festivals, his work was exhibited in the USA, Canada and China. The photographer currently lives in the Chinese metropolis of Chengdu.
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Ernesto Benavides, Dredges
Every year, a number of hectares of Peruvian forest are lost to illegal gold mining. Benavides’s “Dredges” series presents impressive aerial photographs of this destructive exploitation of nature.
In addition to his own photo projects, Benavides works for the France Press Agency, and is published regularly in the international press. He has been teaching photography at the University of Lima since 2010.
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Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2018
more images from the 12 finalists at Leica

Winning photographs from the 2018 RHS Photographic Competition

The RHS Photographic Competition inspires young and old alike to get outdoors and record how enriching and inspiring gardens and plants can be

Kristina Zvinakeviciute
Overall adult winner of the competition Welcoming garden wildlife
One
This image is of a soldier beetle spotted during summer in a meadow of wavy hair grass (Deschampsia flexuosa) near Manchester. Taken with a Sony 77.
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Aleksandr Ivanov
Winner Pure plants
Awakening
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Damjan Voglar
Winner Abstract and details
Nipple
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Madhura Tilve
Winner Under 18s
How the colours change when the sun sets
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Indigo Larmour
Overall Young Winner Under 11s
Am I camouflaged?
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Winning photographs from the 2018 RHS Photographic Competition
more at The Royal Horticultural Society