Desert Island DSLR

I try to shoot atmospheres and the feelings that I have about a place, a moment, an occasion or a person. I try to ignore the physical stuff, as much as you can in photography, and concentrate on conveying the sense of being there. In street stuff it’s trying to capture the atmosphere of a place, even if it’s just a street. I look for the dramatic, beautiful, exciting and inspiring features of those places. Generally that’s around light and colour.

… and finally, what is your Desert Island DSLR?
The Nikon D850 is one of those cameras that really does do everything. It’s got enormous resolution, so many features such as the multi-exposure overlay, and incredible dynamic range.
Damian Demolder
Street photographer, journalist and educator.
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Desert Island DSLR
by Damian Demolder
more in Digital Camera World

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Sea Monster

The sublime waves in Ray Collins’ photographs appear like towering mountain ranges rising up from the sea. Collins seems to freeze the water, capturing waves in the instant just before their imminent break, thus creating a unique interplay between shapes and contrasts. He sits or lies on his surfboard in wait of the perfect moment of rushing water.

Through immediate proximity to the subject, the Australian photographer creates a form of abstraction that leads us to forget that these are pictures of ocean waves. Although the water is clearly recognizable, the waves form portraits of themselves. Shafts of light shimmer in countless nuances, bordering the wave, flooding it with glistening light, or piercing it.

Ray Collins turned his passion into a profession. After getting his start in surf photography, he began to focus more and more on photographing the waves themselves. Collins quickly became an internationally in-demand photographer. His works have an unusual tension because they leave everything unresolved, capturing the second right before the tumultuous crash and spray. Collins says he is fascinated by “the moment before the moment, the anticipation.”
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Ray Collins Photography
via Lumas

The Ultimate Guide to Night Photography

Night photography immediately solves a huge problem that you confront constantly in photography. That problem is being faced with ordinary scenes that just aren’t very interesting. If you take a picture of a building or a standard street scene during the day, it can be sort of dull. We are all used to seeing shots taken in the middle of the day. That same scene – shot at night – can be a really interesting photograph though.

The actual taking of pictures at night might seem a little bit like magic if you are just getting started. Even those who have been shooting a while may wonder how to get a proper exposure and focus in the dark. Although photographing in the dark certainly has its challenges, in some ways, it is actually easier than photography during the day.

So let’s take a quick look at the essentials of night photography. In particular, we’ll cover the gear you need, how to expose your photos, how to focus at night, great subject matter, and some post-processing tips. Hopefully, this will help open up the world of night photography to you.

Hopefully, this guide will help you get started with night photography. As you get ready for your next outing, just remember a few things:
– The only additional items that are necessary for night photography are a tripod and remote shutter release. Some other helpful items are a flashlight, a lens hood, and an extra battery.
– For exposure, start with moderate ISO (around 400) and aperture (around f/5.6-8) and see where that puts your shutter speed. Adjust from there with an eye toward getting the shutter speed (exposure time) you want.
– Pick a subject that lends itself to night photography. Remember that things look very different at night, so take some test shots.
– Focus your camera by finding or creating areas of contrast and setting the autofocus on those areas. When necessary, switch to manual focus.
– When you get home, edit your images as you wish, but you might try decreasing the Highlights, increasing the Shadows, and pulling down the Blacks slightly.

The Ultimate Guide to Night Photography
A Post By: Jim Hamel
In this, the next installment of our dPS ultimate guides, learn what you need to know to get started doing night photography.

get the guide at Digital Photography School

Pelicans with personality: the story behind Andy Rouse’s low-angle portraits

Raising awareness of environmental issues by getting audiences to connect with animals and their habitats isn’t easy, especially in an oversaturated image market. Andy Rouse, one of the world’s leading wildlife photographers and a Canon Ambassador, found a fresh way to draw attention to the endangered Dalmatian pelican.

“When taking portraits, you capture the personality of your subjects, and that’s what I think I did with these guys,” Andy says. He saw that the pelicans had a lot of character in their appearance, and that some of them even looked like celebrities. “There’s all kinds of [famous lookalikes] in there.”

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Pelicans with personality: the story behind Andy Rouse’s low-angle portraits
more at Canon

Remembering Wildlife

The home of the charity book series which includes Remembering Elephants, Remembering Rhinos and now, thanks to another successful Kickstarter campaign, Remembering Great Apes. Our mission is to create the most beautiful books on a species ever made and then, sell those books to raise awareness of the plight facing that species and funds to protect it. Our work is made possible by the generous donation of images by many of the world’s best wildlife photographers including Steve Winter, Art Wolfe, Frans Lanting and Jonathan & Angela Scott.

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more at Remembering Wildlife